Searching \ for '[PIC] Getting started with PICs' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/microchip/begin.htm?key=pic
Search entire site for: 'Getting started with PICs'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[PIC] Getting started with PICs'
2006\08\03@162840 by Richard Youden

picon face

Hi everyone,

Right I want to get started with PIC development, anyway here is my
background.

I have a degree in Electronic Engineering but I tried (rather foolishly
now!) to avoid micro controllers and mainly worked with solid state
electronics, op amps, filters, logic controlled electronics etc...

Anyway I have done a bit of work with DSPs and Xilinx micorcontrollers but
nothing that I ever really got my teath into it. My job involves working
with electronics but nothing really PIC based and that is where I feel I
need to improve my knowledge.

So anyway what I need is advice on systems, books etc that are not too
expensive that is easily avaliable in the UK.

Thanks for any advice on offer.

Richard
--
View this message in context: www.nabble.com/-PIC--Getting-started-with-PICs-tf2047764.html#a5639739
Sent from the MicroControllers - PIC forum at Nabble.com.

2006\08\03@170707 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
Take a look around Maplin (http://www.maplin.co.uk) there are some books and other
stuff as well. I know they are not the cheapest, but for starting might be
ok. Also I am sure that Blackwells and Waterstones have some nice books at
least in their larger stores.

But sometimes it is enough to start with the Microchip home page and with
Google. On Microchip website (http://www.microchip.com) everything had been
described as datasheets and even tips&tricks and I am sure all the new stuff
for you would be only the programming instead of the schematics. By the way,
a beginner book is online at:

http://www.mikroe.com/en/books/picbook/picbook.htm

Hope it helps,
Tamas




On 03/08/06, Richard Youden <spam_OUTr.youdenTakeThisOuTspammac.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\08\03@172530 by John Scott

flavicon
face
Cheapest I found so far...http://www.rapidonline.com - and with a good
all round range....

Tamas Rudnai wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>> --

2006\08\03@172539 by Peter Onion

flavicon
face
On Thu, 2006-08-03 at 13:05 -0700, Richard Youden wrote:

> So anyway what I need is advice on systems, books etc that are not too
> expensive that is easily avaliable in the UK.

Have a look at Rapid Electronics.  http://www.rapidonline.com
They have a selection of books under
Office & IT  >  Technical Publications  >  Pic Microcontrollers

and you can buy PICs from them as well :-)

Peter

PS:  My only connection with them is as a customer.



2006\08\03@174131 by Richard Youden

picon face

Thanks for the replies.

I think what the first reply said is correct. I have done all the state-flow
stuff and schemtatic work (thats why I enjoyed all the work with Xilinx),
what I need to learn is all the C based programming stuff.

I got an old dev kit out today at work and it loaded a program to make a
light flash. I could see where it loaded the variables for the output and
managed to find the variable to change the frequency of the flashing but
after that I was lost!

Anyway thanks for the help. I will try and find something from Rapid and
post what I find to see if it would be any good.

Thanks,

Richard
--
View this message in context: www.nabble.com/-PIC--Getting-started-with-PICs-tf2047764.html#a5641278
Sent from the MicroControllers - PIC forum at Nabble.com.

2006\08\03@180006 by Richard Youden

picon face

OK, I have just found this...

http://www.microchip.com/stellent/idcplg?IdcService=SS_GET_PAGE&nodeId=1406&dDocName=en010020&part=DV003001

It looks OK to me but I have a few questions.

1. Has anyone used this before, esecially the software?
2. The devboard looks purely like a programming board to me or is that just
a bad photo.
3. It says that it only connects via RS232 which I ditched on my computer
long ago, will this work with a USB to serial adaptor?

Thanks.

Richard
--
View this message in context: www.nabble.com/-PIC--Getting-started-with-PICs-tf2047764.html#a5641490
Sent from the MicroControllers - PIC forum at Nabble.com.

2006\08\03@181741 by John Scott

flavicon
face
I just remembered -  http://www.quasarelectronics.com. I bought my first
programmer from them, and it was a parallel port version. They have
quite a cool selection of programmers and project boards - from beginner
to advanced level.

Regards

John

Richard Youden wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2006\08\03@182554 by Mat

flavicon
face
That’s just to program chips, if your going to buy one of those you would be
far better spending your money on an ICD2 from microchip instead, as that
allows you to debug chips in-circuit. The official ICD2 also supports USB,
however the cheaper clones you can buy online (~£30) typically only support
rs232. The cheapest place I found last weak for ICD2's in the UK was
microchipdirect, does anyone know anyplace cheaper?

Just my 2cent,

Mat



{Original Message removed}

2006\08\03@184012 by John Scott

flavicon
face
Also - for anyone interested. A good supplier for inexpensive, ultra
fast delivery components (Unfortunately no PIC's).
http://www.fastcomponents.co.uk/

I bought their Crystal / Resonator bag and their IC socket bag and the
value for money was well worth it. Consider the price of a 40 pin ZIF
socket from most stores is between £9 and £13 - for £3.99 you get a set
of assorted ic sockets with a ZIF included. The packaging was also of a
high standard.

I have no vested interest in this company - just got to give credit when
its due.

Regards

John

John Scott wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>>

2006\08\03@184554 by Gökhan SEVER

picon face
Here is my list of beginning step bookmarks...

'[PIC] How to start with PICs'
http://www.piclist.com/techref/postbot.asp?by=thread&id=%5BPIC%5D+How+to+start+with+PICs&w=body&tgt=_top

* '[PIC] Any advantage of using assembler?'
<www.piclist.com/techref/postbot.asp?by=thread&id=%5BPIC%5D+Any+advantage+of+using+assembler%3F&w=body&tgt=_top>
http://www.piclist.com/techref/postbot.asp?by=thread&id=%5BPIC%5D+Any+advantage+of+using+assembler%3F&w=body&tgt=_top

** '[PIC]: Best C programming book for a beginner...'
<www.piclist.com/techref/postbot.asp?by=thread&id=%5BPIC%5D%3A+Best+C+programming+book+for+a+beginner%2E%2E%2E&w=body&tgt=_top>
http://www.piclist.com/techref/postbot.asp?by=thread&id=%5BPIC%5D%3A+Best+C+programming+book+for+a+beginner%2E%2E%2E&w=body&tgt=_top

** '[PIC] Comparing PIClist and Microchip Forum on PIC'
http://www.piclist.com/techref/postbot.asp?by=thread&id=%5BPIC%5D+Comparing+PIClist+and+Microchip+Forum+on+PIC&w=body&tgt=_top

*pic for dummy
http://forum.microchip.com/tm.aspx?m=19927

Project with PIC16F818  (!!!my favourite !!! j_doin, dchisholm, olin_lathrop
show ;))
http://forum.microchip.com/tm.aspx?m=119679

Beginner Attempting 1st Big project
http://forum.microchip.com/tm.aspx?m=107014&mpage=1&key=&#107014*


Purchase the PICkit2 and jump that train :)


Welcome to the list...




*




On 8/3/06, Richard Youden <r.youdenspamKILLspammac.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\08\03@190517 by Bob Axtell

face picon face
Mat wrote:
> That’s just to program chips, if your going to buy one of those you would be
> far better spending your money on an ICD2 from microchip instead, as that
> allows you to debug chips in-circuit. The official ICD2 also supports USB,
> however the cheaper clones you can buy online (~£30) typically only support
> rs232. The cheapest place I found last weak for ICD2's in the UK was
> microchipdirect, does anyone know anyplace cheaper?
>  
Kenny Wong sells an exact clone ICD2 for $70 USD from his office in HK.
No, I don't have an interest
in his company. I just know that his works BETTER than the Microchip
original, in that rarely does an
external 9V wall-wart need to be used. I know, I now own 2.

In addition, and unlike the MicroChip ICD2, the Kenny Wong clone adds a
programming ZIF socket
for all chips except DsPIC, and another for the DsPIC. So its an
efficient development tool AND
programmer combined.

Just look on EBay for "Full ICD2" from Eketronix (sp?). He only charges
$12 for shipment from HK
by registered mail.

--Bob
> Just my 2cent,
>
> Mat
>
>
>
> {Original Message removed}

2006\08\03@202418 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
Richard,

For learning the basics of PICs I'd recommend this set of online lessons: http://www.amqrp.org/elmer160/ - it will give you a good
grounding in how PICs work, so you'll understand how to debug your projects in future, even if you use C rather than assembler.

On Thu, 3 Aug 2006 15:00:01 -0700 (PDT), Richard Youden wrote:

>
> OK, I have just found this...
>
> www.microchip.com/stellent/idcplg?IdcService=SS_GET_PAGE&nodeId=1406&dDocName=en010020&part=DV003001
>
> It looks OK to me but I have a few questions.
>
> 1. Has anyone used this before, esecially the software?

That's the PICstart Plus, and it's getting pretty long in the tooth now - and rather expensive for what it does.

> 2. The devboard looks purely like a programming board to me or is that just a bad photo.

No, it's just a programmer.

> 3. It says that it only connects via RS232 which I ditched on my computer
> long ago, will this work with a USB to serial adaptor?

Best not to find out!  You'd be better off getting one of the small programmer/development units, PICkit1 or PICkit2, which are
USB-connected and much cheaper and better value than the PICStart Plus.  You can get the PICkit1 from Maplin, by the way, and both are
available from "Buy Microchip".  They handle limited ranges of PICs, but for a beginner they do the ranges that you're likely to need.

The PICkit2 also comes with some simple lessons to teach the basics, and it has a plug-on development board, and you can get a set of
three of those (2 bare, one populated) for thirteen quid plus VAT & P&P, which I reckon is excellent value.  Its only drawback is that at
the moment MPLAB doesn't really support it, but apparently the next release will.

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\08\03@222426 by John Chung

picon face
Hi,

  I own PICStart Plus and ICD2. I started with
PICStart Plus. The easiest to program your chips with
however it does not support the new family of chips
like dsPIC and PIC24. ICD2 is cheaper and is able to
support "programming" and "debugging" your chip
together. ICD2 can also be used together with UPM
module which makes it the same with PICSTART Plus. I
don own the UPM module but just wire wrap it to the
chip to program and run the chip immediately. ICD2
saves time in development time. ICD2 has it's quirks
like power cycle to get it working again but that it
not a real issue once you operate it the WAY it wants
to be operated...


John

--- Richard Youden <.....r.youdenKILLspamspam.....mac.com> wrote:

>
> OK, I have just found this...
>
>
www.microchip.com/stellent/idcplg?IdcService=SS_GET_PAGE&nodeId=1406&dDocName=en010020&part=DV003001
{Quote hidden}

www.nabble.com/-PIC--Getting-started-with-PICs-tf2047764.html#a5641490
> Sent from the MicroControllers - PIC forum at
> Nabble.com.
>
> --

2006\08\04@030527 by Vasile Surducan

face picon face
On 8/3/06, Richard Youden <EraseMEr.youdenspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmac.com> wrote:
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> Right I want to get started with PIC development, anyway here is my
> background.
>
> I have a degree in Electronic Engineering but I tried (rather foolishly
> now!) to avoid micro controllers and mainly worked with solid state
> electronics, op amps, filters, logic controlled electronics etc...
>
> Anyway I have done a bit of work with DSPs and Xilinx micorcontrollers but
> nothing that I ever really got my teath into it. My job involves working
> with electronics but nothing really PIC based and that is where I feel I
> need to improve my knowledge.
>
> So anyway what I need is advice on systems, books etc that are not too
> expensive that is easily avaliable in the UK.
>
> Thanks for any advice on offer.

My advice is simple, it needs only time:

1. don't buy anything (except maybe the microcontroller)
2. do a serious research on the web, everything you need is there for
free, even microcontrolers if you know to search
3. build your own PIC programmer
4. choose you favourite programming language
5. bulid your own prototyping board
6. start playing

best regards,
Vasile

2006\08\13@082900 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> Anyway I have done a bit of work with DSPs and Xilinx
> micorcontrollers but
> nothing that I ever really got my teath into it. My job
> involves working
> with electronics but nothing really PIC based and that is
> where I feel I
> need to improve my knowledge.
>
> So anyway what I need is advice on systems, books etc that are not too
> expensive that is easily avaliable in the UK.

You don't need a system, the basic target hardware can be as simple as
http://www.voti.nl/blink/pics/bb-675i-big.jpg . Just get yoursef a
decent programmer (I would suggest an ICD2 if you can afford it), a few
PICs, a power supply, a solderless breadboard, and some assorted
electronic components. As for books: both the datasheets and the piclist
are free, so who needs books? For an introduction read
http://www.voti.nl/swp/index.html , but it is a bit dated because
Microchip refuses to stop releasing new (and better) PICs.

Most of all: get yourself a project that you want to build, and start
experimenting.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2006\08\13@121430 by olin piclist

face picon face
Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> You don't need a system, the basic target hardware can be as simple as
> http://www.voti.nl/blink/pics/bb-675i-big.jpg . Just get yoursef a
> decent programmer (I would suggest an ICD2 if you can afford it), a
> few PICs, a power supply, a solderless breadboard, and some assorted
> electronic components. As for books: both the datasheets and the
> piclist are free, so who needs books? For an introduction read
> http://www.voti.nl/swp/index.html , but it is a bit dated because
> Microchip refuses to stop releasing new (and better) PICs.
>
> Most of all: get yourself a project that you want to build, and start
> experimenting.

Everything Wouter said is good (as usual).  Depending on how you trade off
time, money, and hassle, you might want my QuickProto-01 PIC prototyping
board to get you going (http://www.embedinc.com/products/qprot01).  It takes
care of the basic infrastructure around a PIC, adds a few niceties like
RS-232 converter and LEDs for debugging, and otherwise gets out of the way
and lets you add your own circuitry on a large breadboard area.


******************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, (978) 742-9014.  #1 PIC
consultant in 2004 program year.  http://www.embedinc.com/products

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2006 , 2007 only
- Today
- New search...