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'[PIC] Expanding on the Velleman K8048?'
2008\10\12@014615 by Rodent of Unusual Size

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I've been using a Velleman K8048 for programming (still
being very new to the subject), and I'm now finding it
a bit limiting.  For instance, it's set up for four inputs
and six outputs (buttons and LEDs).  However, I don't
want to be popping the chips between the K8048 and a
breadboard to test.

Glancing at the schematic, with no detailed examination,
it appears as though I might be able to get access to the
other functions by using the pins in one of the empty
sockets.  For instance, if my PIC is in the 18-pin
socket, I might be able to access some of the other
I/O pins (like A/D) by hooking external components
up to pins in the vacant 22-pin socket.

Has anyone ever done that?  Are there reasons why it would
be a Bad Idea?

Thanks!
--
#ken        P-)}

Ken Coar, Sanagendamgagwedweinini  http://Ken.Coar.Org/
Author, developer, opinionist      http://Apache-Server.Com/

"Millennium hand and shrimp!"

2008\10\12@035226 by Wouter van Ooijen

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(creative use of a K8048)

> Has anyone ever done that?  Are there reasons why it would
> be a Bad Idea?

I guess it can be done, you might even get by with using the K8048 as an
ICSP progger to program an external chip. But IMHO using a K8048 is a
bad idea in the first pace. I would suggest a solderless breadboard, an
ICSP programmer (pickit2, wisp648, one of Olins proggers, etc) and a
bundle of wires. Much more flexible and reliable. I sold K8048's in the
past, but got to many customers with problems.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2008\10\12@075118 by Brendan Gillatt

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Rodent of Unusual Size wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I have a K8048 which I used for several years.
Honestly, the best thing to do once you've outgrown the blinking LEDs, as
it appears you have done, is to learn how to use the ICSP connector. It's
perfectly straightforward and allows you much greater flexibility.

By taking power from the K8048 from the correct pins on the board, you
needn't use an additional external power supply, which is handy.

- --
Brendan Gillatt | GPG Key: 0xBF6A0D94
brendan {a} brendangillatt (dot) co (dot) uk
http://www.brendangillatt.co.uk
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2008\10\29@124017 by Rodent of Unusual Size

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I started more of a discussion than I expected with this thread!
It occurred to me later that a Glomper clip would be even
better for accessing the unused pins in the K8048.

However, as Brendan hinted, I think I'm outgrowing the K8048.
For one thing, the list of devices that Velleman's programing
software can handle is more limited than I expected

In the learn to walk before running department, I'm currently
not interested in learning the ins and outs of ICSP.  That
may change shortly, but's the case at the moment.

So what I'm looking for right now is a recommendation for a
low-cost programer package that can handle pretty much any
of Microchip's PICs.  Having some onboard LEDs and switches
like the K8048 would be useful, for basic testing, and/or a
good way to hook it up to a solderless board.

Again, at the moment I'm just interested in programming the
things from a fairly high level; I'm not down to the
depth of worrying about rise/fall times and similar details --
I just want a package that I can tell what chip I'm using
and it'll do the Right Things to programme it.

And, alas, my budget and time are limited, so I'm currently
looking for a low-cost prepackaged solution rather than
a schematic and parts list from which to build my own.

Sorry to be such a killjoy noob..

Thanks!
--
#ken        P-)}

Ken Coar, Sanagendamgagwedweinini  http://Ken.Coar.Org/
Author, developer, opinionist      http://Apache-Server.Com/

"Millennium hand and shrimp!"

2008\10\29@130553 by Jan-Erik Soderholm

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Rodent of Unusual Size wrote:

> I'm currently
> not interested in learning the ins and outs of ICSP.  That
> may change shortly, but's the case at the moment.

What "ins and outs" ?
It's just to learn how to connect a couple of wires.
Which wire to which pin...

> So what I'm looking for right now is a recommendation for a
> low-cost programer package that can handle pretty much any
> of Microchip's PICs.  Having some onboard LEDs and switches
> like the K8048 would be useful, for basic testing, and/or a
> good way to hook it up to a solderless board.

PICkit2 ?

> Again, at the moment I'm just interested in programming the
> things from a fairly high level; I'm not down to the
> depth of worrying about rise/fall times and similar details --
> I just want a package that I can tell what chip I'm using
> and it'll do the Right Things to programme it.
>
> And, alas, my budget and time are limited, so I'm currently
> looking for a low-cost prepackaged solution rather than
> a schematic and parts list from which to build my own.

PICkit2 !

2008\10\29@130557 by Dr Skip

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I too have a k8048 and thought like you do. However, I went and got the Pickit2
and ICSP is basically a couple of pins on the pic. No more fear! ;) I could see
there being a problem if you were pin-strapped and had to use every pin, but my
suggestion is to get a pic with a few extra pins and just plan on devoting 2 to
the programmer. See the reference schematic for the 44 pin board they sell.

Using it, you could "make" an external programmer with nothing other than a
breadboard and some wires. Much easier than my 8048, which I have shelved. The
$35 Pickit2 handles everything else. It took minutes after getting the pkg to
have it programming a chip. With my budgets and schedule, if I do it, it's
probably a benchmark for cheap and easy! ;)

-Skip


Rodent of Unusual Size wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\10\29@142010 by Wouter van Ooijen

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> And, alas, my budget and time are limited

That's a difficult combination.

Check the pickit2.


--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

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