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'[PIC] 10F gadgets suggestions'
2008\09\19@074144 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
My PIC assembler class uses a 16F887 on a board with plenty of I/O.
That's OK for

I'd like to also give my students a taste for a simple and craped
application - physically small would be nice to emphasise the
'smallness'. My idea is to used 10F PICs, SMD version, with a 3.8V coin
cell, and ... something to make it a nice gadget.

Current ideas:
- small LSP to make a 'melody card'
- IR led to make a 'TV remote saturator'
- SMPS comtroller for a power LED

More suggestions?

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2008\09\19@075907 by Mike Hord

picon face
I keep planning to make a 10F powered LED candle with a non-contact
switch, so I can put it inside of a lamp hanging from the ceiling and turn
it on and off with a magnetic wand.

Mike H.

On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 6:41 AM, Wouter van Ooijen <spam_OUTwouterTakeThisOuTspamvoti.nl> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\09\19@081027 by Michael Rigby-Jones

picon face


> -----Original Message-----
> From: .....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu [piclist-bouncesspamKILLspammit.edu] On
Behalf
{Quote hidden}

coin
> cell, and ... something to make it a nice gadget.
>
> Current ideas:
> - small LSP to make a 'melody card'
> - IR led to make a 'TV remote saturator'
> - SMPS comtroller for a power LED
>
> More suggestions?

Use software PWM to control a few Bi or Tri colour LED's to make a
colour changing decoration?

Brushless motor speed controller e.g. for RC use, 1-2ms input pluse,
three phase output to motor.

Regards

Mike

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2008\09\19@083745 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
> Brushless motor speed controller e.g. for RC use, 1-2ms input pluse,
> three phase output to motor.

That is a challenge! You can have the input on the mclr pin but how do you
get the BEMF then?

Tamas




On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 1:09 PM, Michael Rigby-Jones <
.....Michael.Rigby-JonesKILLspamspam.....bookham.com> wrote:

>
>
> > {Original Message removed}

2008\09\19@083858 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
Too fast sending it...

> > Brushless motor speed controller e.g. for RC use, 1-2ms input pluse,
> > three phase output to motor.
>
> That is a challenge! You can have the input on the mclr pin but how do you
get the BEMF then?

...and how do you drive the 3 phase anyway? (you would need 6 pin)

Tamas


On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 1:37 PM, Tamas Rudnai <EraseMEtamas.rudnaispam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com>wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>> > {Original Message removed}

2008\09\19@084057 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> Use software PWM to control a few Bi or Tri colour LED's to make a
> colour changing decoration?

Good one.

> Brushless motor speed controller e.g. for RC use, 1-2ms input pluse,
> three phase output to motor.

I am not familiar with RC motors, are 3-phase common?

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2008\09\19@084235 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
Mike Hord wrote:
> I keep planning to make a 10F powered LED candle with a non-contact
> switch, so I can put it inside of a lamp hanging from the ceiling and turn
> it on and off with a magnetic wand.

reed-switch? hall-sensor?

Nice, but the mechanical aspect is a big part of the challenge!

(And if you want to put it inside a mains-power lamp: getting the low
voltage for the PIC from the mains voltage...)

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2008\09\19@085608 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
> I am not familiar with RC motors, are 3-phase common?

It is very common to use 3 phase sensorless BLDC motors nowadays - most of
them are outrunners and in delta.

Tamas



On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 1:40 PM, Wouter van Ooijen <@spam@wouterKILLspamspamvoti.nl> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\09\19@091435 by olin piclist

face picon face
Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> Current ideas:
> - small LSP to make a 'melody card'
> - IR led to make a 'TV remote saturator'
> - SMPS comtroller for a power LED

I was actually thinking about something similar.  Something small, cheap,
that can run off slightly used CR2032 coin cells that I happen to have a few
1000 of, and that high school kids would find interesting or at least fun.

One of my ideas was something that would sense light, and when it's dark
emit a short annoying beep every few minutes, or maybe a cricket sound.  You
can use your imagination how kids could put this to "use", just in time for
Halloween.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2008\09\19@101430 by John Ferrell

face picon face
Look at http://www.castlecreations.com/
They are among the most respected suppliers.

At this time I don't know of a source for kits or information for brushless
& sensorless controllers.  There is a market here!

Microchip does have a App Note now that I have not yet read on the subject.
There are sources for motor kits & parts of all sizes on the internet.

John Ferrell    W8CCW

"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing." -- Edmund Burke
http://DixieNC.US

{Original Message removed}

2008\09\19@102009 by Mike Hord

picon face
My plan was a reed switch.

I figure that the standby power consumption of a 10F is so low that I don't
need to mechanically decouple the power supply, I can just let it sit in
sleep mode when I'm not using it.  There's no other circuitry involved, so
the PICs standby consumption (which is what, 200 nA?) is the only real
number involved.

Wake-on-interrupt, reed switch which wakes up the PIC and the PIC
stays on until the reed switch is activated again, which puts it back to
standby.  Software debounce as needed.

Of course, for students, it might be fun watching them try and figure out
how to disconnect the power supply in a latching fashion.

Mike H.

On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 7:42 AM, Wouter van Ooijen <KILLspamwouterKILLspamspamvoti.nl> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\09\19@103053 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
> At this time I don't know of a source for kits or information for
brushless
> & sensorless controllers.  There is a market here!

Try searching for "speed controller rc" and you would be surprised ;-)
If you also put "ESC" (Electronic Speed Controller) and "BEC" (Battery
Eliminator Circuit - aka 5V regulator) which is usually on the same device.
Most of them I have seen based on AVR though.

Tamas



On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 3:15 PM, John Ferrell <RemoveMEjohnferrellTakeThisOuTspamearthlink.net>wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2008\09\19@103328 by Dario Greggio

face picon face
Olin Lathrop wrote:

> One of my ideas was something that would sense light, and when it's dark
> emit a short annoying beep every few minutes, or maybe a cricket sound.

When I was a little boy, I built somthing like that with a CDS and a
NE555 :) (maybe many of us did actually)

Just a note, though: now you can do the cricket in PWM :))

--
Ciao, Dario

2008\09\19@103729 by Jon Chandler

picon face
How about a circuit where the LED is used as a sensor too?  Cover the
RGB LED with your finger to change colors or modes?

Jon



John Ferrell wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2008\09\19@104312 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Sep 19, 2008, at 5:40 AM, Wouter van Ooijen wrote:

>>
>> Brushless motor speed controller e.g. for RC use, 1-2ms input pluse,
>> three phase output to motor.
>
> I am not familiar with RC motors, are 3-phase common?

Yes, but not really in the size range where you'd need a 10F PIC.
However, people have put pretty much complete IR RC receivers in
a 10F (brushed speed control + rudder):
    http://www.oyajin.jp/~toko/pic/0071/index.html
(amazing stuff.  An LED "Throwie" controllable with an TV remote
might be a better beginner project.)
   http://www.instructables.com/id/LED-Throwies/
   http://www.instructables.com/id/LED-Throwie-Talkie/

BillW

2008\09\19@112826 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
>  An LED "Throwie" controllable with an TV remote
> might be a better beginner project.)
>     http://www.instructables.com/id/LED-Throwies/
>     http://www.instructables.com/id/LED-Throwie-Talkie/

I like the "Throwie" idea!

But the IR receivers I have are all 5V operated, from experience they
don't work at all below 4V.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2008\09\19@113607 by Ariel Rocholl

picon face
some ideas:

* 9 button keyboard using ADC on a single pin, would drive a I2C or RS232
serial LCD
* Simon kind of game
* I wouldn't suggest to go for a BLDC controller for students as suggested
above. Many things to know about motors in the first place, then sensorless
control, etc. However, many RC simpler applications such as a 2 wheel robot
using $5 rc servo and software PWM are certainly easy to do.
* LANC <-> RS232 translator to control digital VCR and cameras.
* Some software controlled wireless communication protocol that would end up
wrapping all the glitches to accept/return a RS232 connectivity much simpler
to the main uC or CPU. Kind of proxy 10F for a super-simple flavor of ZigBee
or the like.
* With two 10F, some IR or wired inter-uC communication (to end up switching
on a led or the like)
* Automated PC control simulating PS2 activity by just clicking on a switch
on a 10F pin. Kind of pre-recorded key sequences.

I would suggest more but then... I would ask for royalties. ;-)


2008/9/19, William Chops Westfield <spamBeGonewestfwspamBeGonespammac.com>:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\09\19@114713 by rlistas

picon face
Take a look at this appnote:

Capacitive Sensing with PIC10F

http://www.microchip.com/stellent/idcplg?IdcService=SS_GET_PAGE&nodeId=1824&appnote=en536412



Rubens
SP
Brazil



2008\09\19@122143 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
> However, people have put pretty much complete IR RC receivers in
> a 10F (brushed speed control + rudder):
>    http://www.oyajin.jp/~toko/pic/0071/index.html<http://www.oyajin.jp/%7Etoko/pic/0071/index.html>

That's amazing! Brushed engine control is possible of course, and it also
has a rudder with a coil actuator, nice one!
(With the google translator even the text makes sense to me :-)) )

Tamas



On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 3:43 PM, William Chops Westfield <TakeThisOuTwestfwEraseMEspamspam_OUTmac.com>wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\09\19@122648 by Harold Hallikainen

face
flavicon
face

> Olin Lathrop wrote:
>
>> One of my ideas was something that would sense light, and when it's dark
>> emit a short annoying beep every few minutes, or maybe a cricket sound.
>
> When I was a little boy, I built somthing like that with a CDS and a
> NE555 :) (maybe many of us did actually)
>
> Just a note, though: now you can do the cricket in PWM :))
>
>


I recall reading that the time between cricket chirps is inversely
proportional to temperature, so someone made a cricket based thermometer.
Possibly about as accurate as Microchip's watchdog based thermometer.

I've only used the 10F in one project, and it worked quite well. We had a
product where the volume in an auditorium could be adjusted by up and down
buttons. A customer wanted a knob. So, I used a 10F chip to interpret a
quadrature encoder. Clockwise rotation ran a counter up. Counterclockwise
ran the counter down (including going negative). A timer interrupt would
generate up or down pulses and advance the counter back towards zero. When
it was zero, no more pulses were sent.

Harold

--
FCC Rules Updated Daily at http://www.hallikainen.com - Advertising
opportunities available!

2008\09\19@123728 by Marcel Duchamp

picon face
An RGB led controller is well within the capability of the PIC10; I have
a small pcb that holds one with 3 resistors and either 3 leds or one
3-color led.  It drives them each with slow changing sine wave
intensities but at different frequencies.  Very small which emphasizes
the attributes of the PIC10 series.  Fun results as well.  I put USB
cables on some of them for friends and give them a small chuck of
selenite crystal to rest on it.

Olins switcher could be an entertaining project for students advanced
enough to want more advancement.

A QBF generator might be fun.  It is simply a bit banged "quick brown
fox" generator that fits into a DB9 shell and outputs the old "Quick
brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs back 1234567890 times. CR/LF" These
are (or at least were) handy to verify RS232 receivers.

For students who think the PIC10 is too trivial, assign them the task of
emulating one in 4000 CMOS.

Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\09\19@135219 by olin piclist

face picon face
Marcel Duchamp wrote:
> Olins switcher could be an entertaining project for students advanced
> enough to want more advancement.

I don't know what you mean by my switcher.  I have used 10Fs quite a few
times to control switching power supplies, sometimes several on the same PC
board.

My KnurdLight example PIC project (http://www.embedinc.com/pic/knli) uses a
10F204 to directly control the switching element of a power supply that
drives a string of LEDs.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2008\09\19@140725 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
BTW, my RC filter / failsafe device is also based on 10F202, and it filters
2 channels (therefore 2 inputs / 2 outputs, all legs are gone :-) )

It's on the rudonix.com - but the design is not open source I am afraid.

Tamas


On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 6:51 PM, Olin Lathrop <RemoveMEolin_piclistspamTakeThisOuTembedinc.com>wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\09\19@160524 by Harold Hallikainen

face
flavicon
face
This all reminds me of an article in the April issue of a magazine many
years ago. It was titled "Compute Logs with a Z80." The circuit was an op
amp with a Z80 (connected as a diode) in the feedback.

Harold



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FCC Rules Updated Daily at http://www.hallikainen.com - Advertising
opportunities available!

2008\09\19@172240 by Andre Abelian

flavicon
face
Hi Olin,

In your schematic what does Q3 do? Since it is pnp transistor and
The base is connected to positive voltage (it is off all the time) I do
not see how is it turning On?
The schematic looks interesting. You built boost converter and thru p0
(PWM) Pin you are controlling q2 transistor to stabilize the output.

Thanks

Andre



{Original Message removed}

2008\09\19@221210 by David Meiklejohn

face
flavicon
face
>> Use software PWM to control a few Bi or Tri colour LED's to make a
>> colour changing decoration?
>
> Good one.

The 10Fs only have 3 output pins - yes, you can charlieplex, but that only
gives you 6 LEDs - only 3 x bi-colour or 2 x tri-colour.  Can still make a
nice little display with that, though.

Software PWM for multiple LEDs would be quite a challenge with only 1
timer and no interrupts.  Possible, of course, but certainly challenging.


David Meiklejohn
http://www.gooligum.com.au

2008\09\19@222136 by David Meiklejohn

face
flavicon
face
Harold Hallikainen wrote:
>
> I've only used the 10F in one project, and it worked quite well. We had a
> product where the volume in an auditorium could be adjusted by up and down
> buttons. A customer wanted a knob. So, I used a 10F chip to interpret a
> quadrature encoder. Clockwise rotation ran a counter up. Counterclockwise
> ran the counter down (including going negative). A timer interrupt would
> generate up or down pulses and advance the counter back towards zero. When
> it was zero, no more pulses were sent.

Sorry to be picky, but - you can't have used a timer interrupt in a 10F
project - 10Fs don't have interrupts.
Perhaps you had a loop that polled the timer?


David Meiklejohn
http://www.gooligum.com.au

2008\09\19@222722 by Marcel Duchamp

picon face
David Meiklejohn wrote:
>>> Use software PWM to control a few Bi or Tri colour LED's to make a
>>> colour changing decoration?
>> Good one.
>
> The 10Fs only have 3 output pins - yes, you can charlieplex, but that only
> gives you 6 LEDs - only 3 x bi-colour or 2 x tri-colour.  Can still make a
> nice little display with that, though.
>
> Software PWM for multiple LEDs would be quite a challenge with only 1
> timer and no interrupts.  Possible, of course, but certainly challenging.
>
>
> David Meiklejohn
> http://www.gooligum.com.au
>
Nah. See Scott Dattalos page:
http://www.dattalo.com/technical/software/pic/pwm8.asm

Note the absence of timers. (what is a pic but a big timer?)
Obviously, a pic10 won't be doing pwm for 8 external objects without
external multiplexing but the pwm itself is not complex.


2008\09\20@001235 by Harold Hallikainen

face
flavicon
face

> Sorry to be picky, but - you can't have used a timer interrupt in a 10F
> project - 10Fs don't have interrupts.
> Perhaps you had a loop that polled the timer?
>
>
Picky is good! I don't remember exactly what I did back then (several
years ago). I think I was polling the quadrature encoder and don't recall
what I did with the pulse output. Maybe it was a software loop that polled
the quadrature encoder also... Been too long!

Thanks!

Harold


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FCC Rules Updated Daily at http://www.hallikainen.com - Advertising
opportunities available!

2008\09\20@002459 by David Meiklejohn

face
flavicon
face

>> Software PWM for multiple LEDs would be quite a challenge with only 1
>> timer and no interrupts.  Possible, of course, but certainly
>> challenging.
>>
> Nah. See Scott Dattalos page:
> http://www.dattalo.com/technical/software/pic/pwm8.asm
>
> Note the absence of timers. (what is a pic but a big timer?)
> Obviously, a pic10 won't be doing pwm for 8 external objects without
> external multiplexing but the pwm itself is not complex.

That works if the "pwm_multiple" routine is being called at a constant
rate (as it is in this example) - but the PIC is then doing nothing at all
but generating fixed duty cycle PWM outputs.  As soon as you include some
other code within the loop at the end of this example - say to monitor an
input, perhaps analog, which turns on or off PWM channels or varies the
duty cycles, the timing will not be maintained and the duty cycles will no
longer be accurate.
That's where a timer comes in useful - the PIC can execute a variable
number of instructions due to program branches in response to inputs,
while the timer counts steadily.  It would be easy to modify this example
to have the loop at the end monitor TMR0 and base the PWM routine calls on
that.  But easier still if that routine can be triggered by an interrupt -
not possible on a 10F.


David Meiklejohn
http://www.gooligum.com.au

2008\09\20@080953 by olin piclist

face picon face
Andre Abelian wrote:
> In your schematic what does Q3 do?

What Q3?  I only see Q1 and Q2.

> You built boost converter and thru p0 (PWM) Pin you are
> controlling q2 transistor to stabilize the output.

Are you looking at a different schematic?  There is no pin called P0, and
the 10F204 doesn't have PWM hardware.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2008\09\20@094907 by Charles Rogers

flavicon
face

I built one of these similar to what Olin's idea was about
24 years ago while in the USAF.  I left it on top of  a cabinet
and when the night people would turn the lights out to leave
it would sound just like a bunch of crickts.  Base exterminators
finally were called to spray the building and found it.
The PCB had my initials on it.  I was asked to not
do that anymore.

CR

{Original Message removed}

2008\09\20@141315 by Matthew Miller

flavicon
face
Wouter, another idea is to have the students make an iDropper type
device. See this PDF file:

http://www.merl.com/papers/docs/TR2003-35.pdf

The authors even use PICs for their device!

Matthew

2008\09\20@210939 by Scott Dattalo

face
flavicon
face
David Meiklejohn wrote:

>> Nah. See Scott Dattalos page:
>> http://www.dattalo.com/technical/software/pic/pwm8.asm
>
> That works if the "pwm_multiple" routine is being called at a constant
> rate (as it is in this example) - but the PIC is then doing nothing at all
> but generating fixed duty cycle PWM outputs.  As soon as you include some
> other code within the loop at the end of this example - say to monitor an
> input, perhaps analog, which turns on or off PWM channels or varies the
> duty cycles, the timing will not be maintained and the duty cycles will no
> longer be accurate.

The challenge is to write isochronous code :). The path through the PWM
routine is deterministic, all you have to do is make sure all other paths
are deterministic and the same!

Scott


2008\09\21@092923 by olin piclist

face picon face
Scott Dattalo wrote:
> The challenge is to write isochronous code :). The path through the
> PWM routine is deterministic, all you have to do is make sure all
> other paths are deterministic and the same!

Or re-sync once the various paths get back to the common point that waits to
start the next PWM interval.  This can be done using timer 0.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2008\09\22@070451 by Michael Rigby-Jones

picon face


> -----Original Message-----
> From: piclist-bouncesEraseMEspam.....mit.edu [EraseMEpiclist-bouncesspammit.edu] On
Behalf
{Quote hidden}

waits
> to
> start the next PWM interval.  This can be done using timer 0.

I've done this several times on the low end pics, for a given loop
period you simply have to ensure that all possible paths through the
code take less than this time, and use the timer to make up the
shortfall at the end of the loop. Isochronous code doesn't require the
timer, but does require the application of more brains cells and makes
maintenance more difficult (IMO).

That said a bit of jitter on the PWM of an LED decoration isn't going to
cause too many problems.

Regards

Mike

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2008\09\22@071706 by David Meiklejohn

face
flavicon
face
Michael Rigby-Jones wrote:
>
> I've done this several times on the low end pics, for a given loop
> period you simply have to ensure that all possible paths through the
> code take less than this time, and use the timer to make up the
> shortfall at the end of the loop. Isochronous code doesn't require the
> timer, but does require the application of more brains cells and makes
> maintenance more difficult (IMO).

No, with enough fiddling, you're right - you don't need a timer.  But it's
there, and it's free, so why not use it?


David Meiklejohn
http://www.gooligum.com.au

2008\09\22@094323 by William Couture

face picon face
On Sat, Sep 20, 2008 at 2:09 PM, Matthew Miller <RemoveMEnamiller2EraseMEspamEraseMEnaxs.net> wrote:

> Wouter, another idea is to have the students make an iDropper type
> device. See this PDF file:
>
> http://www.merl.com/papers/docs/TR2003-35.pdf
>
> The authors even use PICs for their device!

William Yerazunis -- I know him!

Bill

--
Psst...  Hey, you... Buddy...  Want a kitten?  straycatblues.petfinder.org

2008\09\22@101837 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
>> Wouter, another idea is to have the students make an iDropper type
>> device. See this PDF file:

Lovely idea. Two ideas:

- matchie: battery+pic+LED. LED lights up when turned on by a match,
flashlight, or another matchie. Burns for a few minutes, flashes a few
times, then dies out. The sport is to keep it on, quickly find someone
to re-light it for you.

- soundie: battery+PIC+pushbutton+LED+LSP. when pressed, plays a melody.
Any soundie that is 'watching' the LED of a playing soundie copies the
meoldy. Add a PC tool (LED+R on serial port) to upload new melodies.

Now find a student who is good enough to make one of both :)

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2008\09\22@102318 by olin piclist

face picon face
William Couture wrote:
> William Yerazunis -- I know him!

I went to school with him.  We were both class of 1978 at RPI, and I knew
him quite well.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2008\09\22@104213 by Andre Abelian

flavicon
face
I am sorry Q1. Q3 was in the schematic I was working on.

Thanks.





-----Original Message-----
From: RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesspam_OUTspamKILLspammit.edu [RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesTakeThisOuTspamspammit.edu] On Behalf
Of Olin Lathrop
Sent: Saturday, September 20, 2008 5:09 AM
To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
Subject: Re: [PIC] 10F gadgets suggestions

Andre Abelian wrote:
> In your schematic what does Q3 do?

What Q3?  I only see Q1 and Q2.

> You built boost converter and thru p0 (PWM) Pin you are
> controlling q2 transistor to stabilize the output.

Are you looking at a different schematic?  There is no pin called P0,
and
the 10F204 doesn't have PWM hardware.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2008\09\23@081411 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>I'd like to also give my students a taste for a simple and craped
>application - physically small would be nice to emphasise the
>'smallness'. My idea is to used 10F PICs, SMD version, with a 3.8V
>coin cell, and ... something to make it a nice gadget.

Bi-directional Morse <-> bit banged UART converter?

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