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'[PIC]:eBook Available online for PIC'
2001\08\06@020814 by Alaa El-agha

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I came across this ebook which is available online focused on the 16F84. It follows the datashett but expands on it with some added diagrams. The book has been translated from Dutche (I think). So, English is not perfect. Note: translation uses "Condenser" to refer to Capacitor, "Mass" to refer to Ground...!!!

You may find it useful..

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2001\08\06@103810 by Mike Kendall

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A condensor is a capacitor in English.  That is why the company "Cardwell
Condensor" in the USA is named such.  It is just a little old fashioned for
most peoples vocabularies.
Mike
{Original Message removed}

2001\08\06@113412 by Dan Michaels

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Mike Kendall wrote:
>A condensor is a capacitor in English.  That is why the company "Cardwell
>Condensor" in the USA is named such.  It is just a little old fashioned for
>most peoples vocabularies.


Back in the old days [I have seen old pictures ;-)], variable condensors
were those things with big movable metal plates. They must have thought
that electrons "condensed" out of the ether, and deposited onto those
plates, and this was how charge was stored.

Today's use of the word "capacitor" [older capacitator ???] makes a
lot more sense, of course - the english do have a way with words.

Better than "charge storage box", I guess - which is prolly what
some literal american would have named it.

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2001\08\06@115827 by Mike Kendall

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Actually,  it would make more sense to think of it as a radio term.  RCA and
radios were the internet back in the 20's. There are alot of parallelisms
between how RCA's stocks were overvalued and caused the stock market crash
of 1929 and the "dot com" stocks were in modern times.  Capacitors and
inductors are used to shorten the electrical length of an antenna.....hence
a condensor.  The  large variable capacitors are not a thing of the past.
They are still commonly used in transmitters that require large working
voltages in the KV range.  People that have worked with radios for many
years commonly call capacitors "condensors", tuners "couplers", dipoles
"doublets", etc.  I respect the traditional terminology and all the rich
history that goes along with radios and commonly find myself using any of
those terms.  If you are talking about a .1uF filter capacitor in a PICmicro
book, it would seem really wrong to call it a condensor.  If you are talking
about  a capacitor in a radio circuit, there doesn't seem anything wrong
with it to me.
Mike
{Original Message removed}

2001\08\06@141043 by John Ferrell

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We are getting a little off topic here but as I recall the early electricity
experimenter who studied the subject was named Leyden. He called his
apparatus a "Leyden Jar". It consisted of a glass jar with foil on the
inside and outside which would accumulate a static charge. He referred to
this as "condensing".  Several years ago there came a movement to rename
familiar terms in the electronics industry. Hertz was decided to make more
sense than CPS (cycles per second) and Capacitor was deemed a better choice
than condenser. Some older documents refer to capacitors as accumulators. I
personally would have chosen that term although it tends to be ambiguous
with "battery".



John Ferrell
6241 Phillippi Rd
Julian NC 27283
Phone: (336)685-9606
Dixie Competition Products
NSRCA 479 AMA 4190  W8CCW
"My Competition is Not My Enemy"



{Original Message removed}

2001\08\06@145853 by uter van ooijen & floortje hanneman

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> We are getting a little off topic here but as I recall the early
electricity
> experimenter who studied the subject was named Leyden.

AFAIK the inventor was Von Kleist, Petrus van Musschenbroek (two names for
the same person? not uncommen those days) and he worked in Leiden (a
university city in holland).

Wouter

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2001\08\06@163137 by John Ferrell

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Could be!

It has been a very long time since I read that.

John Ferrell
6241 Phillippi Rd
Julian NC 27283
Phone: (336)685-9606
Dixie Competition Products
NSRCA 479 AMA 4190  W8CCW
"My Competition is Not My Enemy"



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