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'[PIC]: The 16C54 and RTCC'
2003\04\09@192915 by John Nall

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(This might should have been OT -- it is sometimes hard to know exactly
where the dividing line might be).

Suddenly having a need for a C compiler, and having downloaded the PICCLITE
compiler (for which I am eternally grateful to Hi-Tech, for having made it
available at no charge to students and hobbyists, seeing as I consider
myself to be in both camps) I find a strange thing, and hope someone can
clear it up for me.

There are some sample programs, and one called METRO.C  (a metronome
program - surprise!!) seems to be one I can adapt for my metronome
project.  According to the comments, it is written for a 16C54
chip.  OK.  I can deal with that, thought I.  I want to use a 16F628 chip,
so obviously have to see what differences there are.  Not many, or at least
none that will prevent it from being used.

HOWEVER -- the program would not compile because there is an undeclared
variable, by the name of RTCC.  It appears to me that RTCC and TMR0 are the
same, and so this is not a big thing.  Except that I am curious as to why
they called it RTCC.  Is this a historical thing?  Did TMR0 used to be
called RTCC?  The data sheet for the 16C54 makes no mention of RTCC.

(I just know that someone is going to write me and tell me that I only have
to change it to TMR0.  Hey, I know that already!! :-)   I just wonder why
it was called RTCC.)

John

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2003\04\09@200732 by William Chops Westfield

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   HOWEVER -- the program would not compile because there is an undeclared
   variable, by the name of RTCC.  It appears to me that RTCC and TMR0 are the
   same, and so this is not a big thing.  Except that I am curious as to why
   they called it RTCC.  Is this a historical thing?  Did TMR0 used to be
   called RTCC?  The data sheet for the 16C54 makes no mention of RTCC.

Yes, it's historical.  My 1992 databook mentions only RTCC and no TMR0.  Now
I'm sorta wishing I'd saved my 1984 databook as well, although it looks like
not much happened between 84 and 92.  I guess they didn't change the names
till they introduced a PIC with more than one timer...

BillW

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2003\04\09@201333 by Andrew Warren

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John Nall <spam_OUTPICLISTTakeThisOuTspammitvma.mit.edu> wrote:

> the program would not compile because there is an undeclared
> variable, by the name of RTCC.  It appears to me that RTCC and
> TMR0 are the same, and so this is not a big thing.  Except that I
> am curious as to why they called it RTCC.  Is this a historical
> thing? Did TMR0 used to be called RTCC?  The data sheet for the
> 16C54 makes no mention of RTCC.

   You are correct; RTCC (Real Time Clock/Counter) is what
   Microchip used to call TMR0.

   -Andy

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2003\04\09@201545 by Dwayne Reid

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At 07:27 PM 4/9/03 -0400, John Nall wrote:

>HOWEVER -- the program would not compile because there is an undeclared
>variable, by the name of RTCC.  It appears to me that RTCC and TMR0 are the
>same, and so this is not a big thing.  Except that I am curious as to why
>they called it RTCC.  Is this a historical thing?  Did TMR0 used to be
>called RTCC?  The data sheet for the 16C54 makes no mention of RTCC.

Yep - PICs used to have only 1 timer called RTCC (Real Time Clock
Counter).  Then they started to grow up into the PICs we know today.

Another change that occured along the way: INADR is now called INDF.  There
are undoubtedly others.

dwayne

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2003\04\09@203824 by Rick Regan

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>HOWEVER -- the program would not compile because
>there is an undeclared variable, by the name of
>RTCC.  It appears to me that RTCC and TMR0 are
>the same, and so this is not a big thing.

In the PICC Lite include directory is a file
called pic1684.h, which has these two lines in it:

static volatile unsigned char   RTCC    @ 0x01;
static volatile unsigned char   TMR0    @ 0x01;

If you were using the 16F84/A your code would have
compiled.  I guess they figured the 16F628 is "new"
so why bother dragging the old constant around.

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2003\04\09@204244 by Jinx

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Scenix still use RTCC for both the pin & timer. "Real Time Clock
Counter" describes both functions, as opposed to TMR0 + T0CKI
but it's just names

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2003\04\09@205103 by Andrew Warren

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Dwayne Reid <.....PICLISTKILLspamspam.....mitvma.mit.edu> wrote:

> Another change that occured along the way: INADR is now called
> INDF.

   Dwayne:

   Do you have an old Microchip datasheet that refers to that
   register as INADR?  I don't remember that register even HAVING a
   name until they decided to call it INDF; in my early 16C54 code,
   I just called it USEFSR.

> There are undoubtedly others.

   They had at least one bit whose original "official" name began
   with a numeric digit... I forget exactly which, but it could
   easily have been the one that put the UART into 9-bit mode;
   "9BIT" is an excellent name for that bit until you actually need
   to write code that accesses it.

   Offhand, I can't think of any others.

   -Andy

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2003\04\10@091255 by Alex Kilpatrick

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>
>     You are correct; RTCC (Real Time Clock/Counter) is what
>     Microchip used to call TMR0.
>
>     -Andy
>
In modern usage, doesn't "real-time clock" mean something that either
keeps "clock time" or a large count of seconds (with fractions) that can
be converted to clock time?  I am thinking of the DS1994 real-time clock
iButton and similar devices.

Alex

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2003\04\10@133529 by Dwayne Reid

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At 08:11 AM 4/10/03 -0500, Alex Kilpatrick wrote:
> >
> >     You are correct; RTCC (Real Time Clock/Counter) is what
> >     Microchip used to call TMR0.
>
>In modern usage, doesn't "real-time clock" mean something that either
>keeps "clock time" or a large count of seconds (with fractions) that can
>be converted to clock time?  I am thinking of the DS1994 real-time clock
>iButton and similar devices.

Perhaps.  But Microchip's usage of that term was accurate - by using that
timer, one could write code that kept track of real time accurate to within
1 clock cycle over a period of years.  Have a look at the app note that
describes Microchip's version of a clock radio controller (alarm clock) for
some of the techinques used.  This would have been much more difficult
without that timer.

dwayne

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