Searching \ for '[PIC]: R&' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/microchip/devices.htm?key=pic
Search entire site for: 'R&'.

No exact or substring matches. trying for part
PICList Thread
'[OT] ISD5008 - R&D Electronics'
2000\01\25@022831 by David Duffy

flavicon
face
<x-flowed>Hi,
Firstly, has anyone used the ISD5008 recorder chip with a PIC ?
It looks like a very flexible device - any nasties lurking with it ?
Also, have R&D Electronics been eaten up by another company ?
They used to distribute the ISD range but emails are bouncing !
Regards...

</x-flowed>

2000\01\25@061141 by Russell McMahon

picon face
David,

From: David Duffy <spam_OUTAVDTakeThisOuTspamUQ.NET.AU>
>Firstly, has anyone used the ISD5008 recorder chip with a PIC ?
>It looks like a very flexible device - any nasties lurking with it ?


I asked the same question a week or so ago but nobody here replied.

I'm due to get 4 x ISD5008 "soon" - should have been here by now.

>Also, have R&D Electronics been eaten up by another company ?
>They used to distribute the ISD range but emails are bouncing !


R&D "merged" with ADILAM>
Sydney 2 9635 4500
That's who I'm getting my samples from (NZ branch)

>Regards...
>
     Russell McMahon
_____________________________

>From other worlds - http://www.easttimor.com
                               http://www.sudan.com

What can one man* do?
Help the hungry at no cost to yourself!
at  http://www.thehungersite.com/

(* - or woman, child or internet enabled intelligent entity :-))


'[OT]: R&D Contract example. Binding in Oz...'
2001\02\22@233750 by Antonio L Benci
flavicon
picon face
part 1 768 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset=us-ascii (decoded 7bit)

To all R&D engineers, I need some help:

I'm just about to start on a private project and am looking for examples
of R&D Contracts which protects myself and the clients interests. Any
pointers would be appreciated.

Nino.
--
------------------------------------------------------
| Antonio (Nino) L. Benci                            |
| Professional Officer, Electronic Services          |
| School of Physics & Materials Engineering          |
| Monash University                                  |
| email: .....nino.benciKILLspamspam@spam@spme.monash.edu                  |
| T: 61 3 9905 3649. F: 61 3 9905 3637               |
| M: 0414 924 833                                    |
------------------------------------------------------


part 2 586 bytes content-type:text/x-vcard; charset=us-ascii; name=Nino.Benci.vcf
(decoded 7bit)

begin:vcard
n:Benci;Antonio L
tel;cell:0414 924 833
tel;fax:+61 3 9905 3637
tel;home:0414 924 833
tel;work:+61 3 9905 3649
x-mozilla-html:FALSE
url:http://www.physics.monash.edu.au/~ninob
org:Monash University;School of Physics & Materials Engineering
version:2.1
email;internet:Nino.BencispamKILLspamspme.monash.edu
title:Professional Officer, Electronic Services
adr;quoted-printable:;;PO Box 27=0D=0ASchool of Physics and Materials Engineering=0D=0AMonash University;Monash University;VIC;3800;Australia
x-mozilla-cpt:;10672
fn:Antonio L Benci
end:vcard


part 3 144 bytes
--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics



'[OT]: R&V Mc "out ot town".'
2001\10\11@233722 by Russell McMahon
picon face
Val & I will be away for 1 week from about Sat 13 Oct to Sat 20 Oct.
Possibly in limited email contact via .....RuslKILLspamspam.....zfree.co.nz (depending on whether
Whitianga has an Internet cafe and/or I can find a phone outlet),
but am unlikely to clear my normal email.

The truly desperate may be able to contact me by mobile on 021 133 7063
Misc family members will be home in our absence.

regards



     Russell McMahon
_____________________________

What can one man* do?
Choose a charity from 700,000 options !  http://www.helping.org
Donate Vitamin A!  http://www.thechildsurvivalsite.com/
http://www.rawa.com  - one perspective on Afghanistan
http://www.changingourworld.com    http://www.easttimor.com   http://www.sudan.com

(* - or woman, child or internet enabled intelligent entity :-))

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.



'[EE]:: Jack Gansell on R&D'
2007\12\27@015127 by Apptech
face
flavicon
face
(The great) Jack Gansell says:

There's no such thing as R&D.
There's R, and there's D, and the two are completely
separate activities.

       http://www.embedded.com/columns/technicalinsights/204805353?_requestid=837985

Worth a read.

Somewhat to my dismay, I find myself at present unavoidably
doing D & R :-(.


       Russell


2007\12\27@023156 by Vasile Surducan

face picon face
"Research is all about discovering new things"

Reading a datasheet for the first time could be research in the spirit
of above definition.

"Development is taking known ideas and using them to build products. "

No comment, but I'm sure not all guys here agree this definition.

Vasile

On 12/27/07, Apptech <EraseMEapptechspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTparadise.net.nz> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2007\12\27@025024 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On 12/27/07, Apptech <apptechspamspam_OUTparadise.net.nz> wrote:
> (The great) Jack Gansell says:
>
> There's no such thing as R&D.
> There's R, and there's D, and the two are completely
> separate activities.
>
>        http://www.embedded.com/columns/technicalinsights/204805353?_requestid=837985
>
> Worth a read.
>
> Somewhat to my dismay, I find myself at present unavoidably
> doing D & R :-(.
>

Here in Singapore we often discuss issues since mostly "R+D"
here is mostly "D"  and only a litttle bit of "R". "R" is typically
done in the US or Europe (not so sure if Australia and NZ have
much "R" or not).

It is true that research type of project is very difficult to schedule.
And an almost faied project I did before was originally a development
type project but the specification was set too high and that project
became kind of "R" type. A full year project became two year plus.
Lucikly the project did come to light even though I left the company
to study in US (but I finished the hardware design and a German
intern student helped to finished the firmware I started before I left).

We developed the electronics module (FEW52/54/58) for the
LiquidPoint T31/32. It was a joined porject between
Pepperl+Fuchs and Endress+Hauser and used PIC18F872
or PIC18LF872.
https://wa001.endress.com/dla/50001532011/000/00/TI375FAE.pdf

The German student  was really very good so Endress+Hauser
decided to hire him.

The power supply design was thought to be the main difficult
point (FEW54 --univeral AC/DC, FEW58: NAMUR, very low
current but with isolated push-pull converter) but I managed
to solved it quite early in the development cycle. The main
problem was the accuracy of the detection. We believed
that the specification should not be that critical, but the old
one (purely analog based) was said to have about 1% error
in normal temperature. We struggled to solve this to no
avail. Luckily finally an excellent idea from the Endress
engineers solved the problem. It still did not achieve the
original specification but it was deemed good enough to
continue the project.

With this experience, when I returned to the company
and started another seems-to-be-impossible project, we
spent time on the feasibility study and that project went
through better in terms of electronics and firmware
(not that smooth because of some mechanical
and production problems).

I was working for Pepperl+Fuchs, a Germany company.
Quality was first. Time to market was second.

Now that things seem to be changed since I worked
for a different company.

Xiaofan

2007\12\27@032509 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Dec 26, 2007, at 9:46 PM, Apptech wrote:

> There's no such thing as R&D.

While philosophically I'm inclined to agree, he's
missing the point.  At least in the USA, "R&D" is
a category of expenses with somewhat favorable tax
treatment, and as long as the IRS groups them together,
so will "the suits" and the annual reports, and
nothing the engineers and scientists say matters.

It's probably a good thing; I would hate to have
to figure out exactly where the dividing line was.

BillW

2007\12\27@034304 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> Here in Singapore we often discuss issues since mostly
> "R+D"
> here is mostly "D"  and only a litttle bit of "R". "R" is
> typically
> done in the US or Europe (not so sure if Australia and NZ
> have
> much "R" or not).

We used to have quite a lot.
But, in recent decades the drive to "useful science" has
gutted the centres of excellence which we once had. Despite
this there are small bodies of scientists still doing pure
science research on government grants and universities still
managing.

Long long ago NZers were occasionally "right up there" in
international research - although they may have ended up
leaving the antipodes / colonies to pursue their aims. The
atom having been split and all that there's less call for
that these days :-).


       Russell


2007\12\27@034458 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On 12/27/07, William Chops Westfield <@spam@westfwKILLspamspammac.com> wrote:
>
> On Dec 26, 2007, at 9:46 PM, Apptech wrote:
>
> > There's no such thing as R&D.
>
> While philosophically I'm inclined to agree, he's
> missing the point.  At least in the USA, "R&D" is
> a category of expenses with somewhat favorable tax
> treatment, and as long as the IRS groups them together,
> so will "the suits" and the annual reports, and
> nothing the engineers and scientists say matters.
>
> It's probably a good thing; I would hate to have
> to figure out exactly where the dividing line was.

Big companies (GE/Microsoft/Intel/HP/etc) will have
dedicated research companies where researchers
do have more freedoms than "R+D" engineers.
Some of them do not need to be under the pressure
of time to market and they can develop something
which will only be useful 5-10 years down the road
or even seem to be useless.

It seems to me US companies use "Engineering"
whereas Europe/Asian companies use "R+D".

The problem is now that less and less companies
will be afford to have the dedicated big research
labs.

Singapore government is trying very hard to attract
high level researchers but so far the result is not that
good as far as I know. On the other hand, it is
quite successful to attract high-tech industry to
here.

Xiaofan

2007\12\27@043525 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> It seems to me US companies use "Engineering"
> whereas Europe/Asian companies use "R+D".

There is another category, which is somewhat arguably the
very tail end of "D". It's 'J' aka "Just do it!". ie if you
can conceive of a customer-view description of a product,
then if you can work out how to make something that appears
to do this then Just do it and sell it. I'm not talking
about the pure snake oil products but the less technically
complex consumer items that stagger onto the market with no
semblance of 'development as you know it, Jim'. Longevity,
reliability, efficiency, accuracy, sensible utilisation of
battery (or other) energy and more (or less) is the norm. If
a resistor can be saved it will be and if it can't it still
will be. The market is awash with such stuff and it sells -
notwithstanding that a fair bit of it will be hard pressed
to stagger along from Christmas to the new year. What R
there may have been has been done N copies up the stream and
is long forgotten. FWIW.


       Russell

2007\12\27@070121 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
William "Chops" Westfield wrote:

> On Dec 26, 2007, at 9:46 PM, Apptech wrote:
>
>> There's no such thing as R&D.
>
> While philosophically I'm inclined to agree,

I possibly may agree that in an ideal world, things would be that way, but
probably not even then.

I mean, if you really separate R and D the way he does, that would mean
that there is a time when you have nothing more to learn about your
project. That's a pretty arrogant proposition, IMO, and not useful.

For me, it's all about the right measure. Sure you need to do some research
for many projects before starting, but invariably there's a point where you
have to stop researching and start designing -- and invariably that point
comes /before/ you know it all. (In my case, usually a project gets
delivered before I know it all... :) So after finding out ("researching")
the main parts, you start working on solutions ("developing"), and go back
and forth as needed. Who never has "researched" data sheets for suitable
products /while/ "developing" a solution?

IMO any engineering activity contains both elements, to varying degrees.
Even when researching for a project, there's most of the time at least half
an eye on possible, practical solutions (that is, development). And when
developing a project, there's usually quite a bit of detail research (about
all those things where "'new' might mean new to us but not to the world"
:).

Gerhard

2007\12\27@080026 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 02:31 AM 12/27/2007, you wrote:
>"Research is all about discovering new things"
>
>Reading a datasheet for the first time could be research in the spirit
>of above definition.
>
>"Development is taking known ideas and using them to build products. "
>
>No comment, but I'm sure not all guys here agree this definition.
>
>Vasile

This is the kind of definition I like, from the Mandarins in Ottawa:-

(SR&ED stands for Scientific Research and Experimental Development)

-----

Work that qualifies for SR&ED tax credits includes:
   * experimental development to achieve technological advancement
to create new materials, devices, products, or processes, or improve
existing ones;
   * applied research to advance scientific knowledge with a
specific practical application in view;
   * basic research to advance scientific knowledge without a
specific practical application in view; and
   * support work in engineering, design, operations research,
mathematical analysis, computer programming, data collection,
testing, or psychological research, but only if the work is
commensurate with, and directly supports, the eligible experimental
development, or applied or basic research.

The following activities are not eligible for benefits under the program:
   * social science and humanities research;
   * commercial production of a new or improved material, device, or
product, or the commercial use of a new or improved process;
   * style changes;
   * market research or sales promotion;
   * quality control or routine testing of materials, devices,
products, or processes;
   * routine data collection;
   * prospecting, exploring, or drilling for or producing minerals,
petroleum, or natural gas; and
   * development based solely on design or routine engineering practice.
----

Quite similar engineering work could be a part of an SR&ED effort or simply
routine engineering work, depending on the intent of the project, but routine
engineering by itself is never SR&ED. IME, engineers usually much more aware
than accounting types of whether any technological risk is being undertaken or
not.

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
KILLspamspeffKILLspamspaminterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com



2007\12\27@112144 by Vasile Surducan

face picon face
On 12/27/07, Spehro Pefhany <RemoveMEspeffTakeThisOuTspaminterlog.com> wrote:
> At 02:31 AM 12/27/2007, you wrote:
> >"Research is all about discovering new things"
> >
> >Reading a datasheet for the first time could be research in the spirit
> >of above definition.
> >
> >"Development is taking known ideas and using them to build products. "
> >
> >No comment, but I'm sure not all guys here agree this definition.
> >
> >Vasile
>
> This is the kind of definition I like, from the Mandarins in Ottawa:-

Just for your record: I'm working in R&D since 20 years, so maybe the
mandarins have right. This fight about what the hell is R and what the
hell want those damn D engineers which are finalising their research
with a product, a technology or just a patent is really useless.
:)

{Quote hidden}

> -

2007\12\27@122455 by jim

flavicon
face
what did you say?
----- Original Message -----
From: "Vasile Surducan" <TakeThisOuTpiclist9EraseMEspamspam_OUTgmail.com>
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <RemoveMEpiclistspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu>
Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2007 10:21 AM
Subject: Re: [EE]:: Jack Gansell on R&D


{Quote hidden}

>> --

2007\12\28@035234 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
face

On Dec 27, 2007, at 4:36 AM, Gerhard Fiedler wrote:

> William "Chops" Westfield wrote:
>
>> On Dec 26, 2007, at 9:46 PM, Apptech wrote:
>>
>>> There's no such thing as R&D.
>>
>> While philosophically I'm inclined to agree,



Philosophy makes for interesting "models" of real-life, but after  
reading the article, I think it's out to lunch.  A typical "lack of  
reality" article.

What has always worked historically is: Iterative development with  
research mixed in.

You build what you can, and you keep improving on it.  Edison, Nobel,  
O & W Wright, etc... all students of persistence more than brilliance.

Additionally, more than 50% of the articles of a historical nature  
that I've read on all sorts of "discoveries", all seem to have an  
element of "luck" involved in them, along with inordinate amounts of  
stubbornness or persistence on the part of the "researcher".

Just tonight, I was listening to a podcast about someone looking for  
nitrates in the late 1800's literally walking by the richest nitrate-
laden ore sample ever found every day -- which was being used at a  
doorstop for their lab.

(If you've never read anything about the history of nitrates before  
chemical processes were made to manufacture them, do.  It's a  
fascinating tale full of all sorts of power struggles.  Explosives --  
and thus war -- was tied at the hip with nitrates until they could be  
synthesized.  Whoever controlled the nitrates, controlled the world's  
arsenals.)

The lab "doorstop" was thought to be something else, until a curious  
chemist who wouldn't "forget about it" when told it wasn't a chunk of  
petrified wood (what everyone else thought it was), finally chopped a  
chunk off of it and tested it.  It took him three months to get around  
to doing it.

Similar stories seem to abound in all sorts of fields.  Far more often  
than not, in my experience.  But I can't prove that with any hard  
numbers or studies...

--
Nate Duehr
RemoveMEnateEraseMEspamEraseMEnatetech.com



2007\12\28@073154 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> Additionally, more than 50% of the articles of a
> historical nature
> that I've read on all sorts of "discoveries", all seem to
> have an
> element of "luck" involved in them, along with inordinate
> amounts of
> stubbornness or persistence on the part of the
> "researcher".

ALL new discoveries are happenstance.
EVERYTHING we do is stamp collecting.
Despite what a top NZ researcher once said :-).

We can systematise what we have learned, and we can learn
about subsets of what stamp collecting has brought us by
applying the knowledge to build models of the missing parts,
but by definition, what is wholly unknown cannot be found by
anything except intelligently guided  guesswork. We may
discover an especially shiny pile of pebbles on Newton's
beach and decide that there may be others nearby. We may
stumble on 3 pieces of the jigsaw puzzle and deduce the
shape of the top-quark piece that has to fit into one of the
empty gaps, but we cannot leap into emptiness and demand
that something be there as we wish it to be. To some extent
the larger discovered frameworks of conservation of this or
that (energy, momentum, ...) help us to fill in what appear
to be the borders of the puzzle. But we will continue to be
taunted by hints that the borders are but an illusion (eg by
"dark matter" whenever we begin to conclude that we have
gone about as far as we can go, that there is room in the
world for maybe 6 (or 10 or ...) computers or that Quantum
mechanics must make sense. Or mustn't.

None of which has especially much to do with Jack's thesis
:-)


       Russell





2007\12\28@125131 by John Gardner

picon face
On Dec 28, 2007 12:52 AM, Nate Duehr <RemoveMEnatespam_OUTspamKILLspamnatetech.com> wrote:
> ...
> (If you've never read anything about the history of nitrates before
> chemical processes were made to manufacture them, do.  It's a
> fascinating tale ...

Hi Nate,

Care to share your source?

regards, Jack

2007\12\28@133701 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
face

On Dec 28, 2007, at 10:51 AM, John Gardner wrote:

> On Dec 28, 2007 12:52 AM, Nate Duehr <RemoveMEnateTakeThisOuTspamspamnatetech.com> wrote:
>> ...
>> (If you've never read anything about the history of nitrates before
>> chemical processes were made to manufacture them, do.  It's a
>> fascinating tale ...
>
> Hi Nate,
>
> Care to share your source?


One of the first that piqued my interest in how nitrate mining and  
discovery was intertwined in world politics was :

"A Most Damnable Invention: Dynamite, Nitrates, and the Making of the  
Modern World"

"http://www.amazon.com/Most-Damnable-Invention-Dynamite-Nitrates/dp/031232913X/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1198866761&sr=8-8
"

That link is to the hardcover version, but my copy is a paperback.  
Amazon doesn't show any paperbacks in stock anywhere, new or used.

--
Nate Duehr
EraseMEnatespamspamspamBeGonenatetech.com



2007\12\28@135241 by David VanHorn

picon face
I agree, R and D are like Inhale and Exhale.  I don't do both at the
same time usually, but it's all part of breathing.. In small firms,
you'll probably have to do both, and you probably want to keep the R
as a small "r" and the D as a big D.

2007\12\28@144434 by John Gardner

picon face
Thanks.

On Dec 28, 2007 10:36 AM, Nate Duehr > One of the first that piqued my
interest in how nitrate mining and
> discovery was intertwined in world politics was :
>
> "A Most Damnable Invention: Dynamite, Nitrates, and the Making of the
> Modern World"
>
> "www.amazon.com/Most-Damnable-Invention-Dynamite-Nitrates/dp/031232913X/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1198866761&sr=8-8
> "
>
> That link is to the hardcover version, but my copy is a paperback.
> Amazon doesn't show any paperbacks in stock anywhere, new or used.

2007\12\28@171143 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
>I agree, R and D are like Inhale and Exhale.  I don't do
>both at the
> same time usually, but it's all part of breathing.. In
> small firms,
> you'll probably have to do both, and you probably want to
> keep the R
> as a small "r" and the D as a big D.


I think that Jack would be surprised and possibly interested
and probably pleased at the discussion that his comments
caused on this thread alone.


       Russell


2007\12\28@171425 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> On Dec 28, 2007 10:36 AM, Nate Duehr > One of the first
> that piqued my
> interest in how nitrate mining and
>> discovery was intertwined in world politics was :
>>
>> "A Most Damnable Invention: Dynamite, Nitrates, and the
>> Making of the
>> Modern World"
>>
>> "http://www.amazon.com/Most-Damnable-Invention-Dynamite-Nitrates/dp/031232913X/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1198866761&sr=8-8

It have always found it 'interesting' that the Nobel prize
system was essentially funded by the 'discovery' of
dynamite.



       Russell


'[EE]: Interesting podcasts was:Jack Gansell on R&D'
2008\01\03@085447 by M. Adam Davis
face picon face
On 12/28/07, Nate Duehr <RemoveMEnateKILLspamspamnatetech.com> wrote:
> Just tonight, I was listening to a podcast about someone looking for
> nitrates in the late 1800's literally walking by the richest nitrate-
> laden ore sample ever found every day -- which was being used at a
> doorstop for their lab.

Which podcast was that?  I'm getting more and more into podcasts as my
commute has expanded to 30-45 minutes each way.

I listen to Science Friday (radio call-in show, ~2 hours/wk) and a few
other non-technical/science podcasts.

I haven't perused the BBC podcasts yet, but expect to look into that later.

Anyone else have pointers to interesting podcasts?

-Adam

--
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Moving in southeast Michigan? Buy my house: http://ubasics.com/house/

Interested in electronics? Check out the projects at http://ubasics.com

Building your own house? Check out http://ubasics.com/home/

2008\01\04@010103 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
face

On Jan 3, 2008, at 6:54 AM, M. Adam Davis wrote:

> On 12/28/07, Nate Duehr <nateSTOPspamspamspam_OUTnatetech.com> wrote:
>> Just tonight, I was listening to a podcast about someone looking for
>> nitrates in the late 1800's literally walking by the richest nitrate-
>> laden ore sample ever found every day -- which was being used at a
>> doorstop for their lab.
>
> Which podcast was that?  I'm getting more and more into podcasts as my
> commute has expanded to 30-45 minutes each way.

It was actually an article about an island embedded in the longer  
complete "themed" stories from "This American Life" from PBS --  
they've been offering up the show for a few years now as a free  
podcast, but it's costing their radio station about $150K a year to do  
it, and they're begging for donations fairly regularly now.  I guess  
"Public Broadcasting" funds don't include paying the server farm  
bills.  (It was #253, "The Middle of Nowhere")   I'm getting that one  
via the iTunes RSS feed, but they say their website is http://www.thisamericanlife.org
 -- haven't been there yet, though.

> I listen to Science Friday (radio call-in show, ~2 hours/wk) and a few
> other non-technical/science podcasts.

I'm finding (as are a few of my favorite podcasters this year) that  
folks prefer anywhere from 1/2 hour to 1 hour content once you start  
listening to multiple shows.  2 hours is just too long for anything  
other than a road-trip.  But they're GREAT for that.  Jeff KE9V's  
"Long Delayed Echos" series on Ham Radio during WW2 was outstanding  
for a couple of long road-trips, but he's committed to shortening his  
podcasts this year, and it's working for me that way too.  (The link's  
below...)

> I haven't perused the BBC podcasts yet, but expect to look into that  
> later.
>
> Anyone else have pointers to interesting podcasts?
>
> -Adam


Definitely throw in Scientific American's 60-Second Science.  Lots of  
"Russell-like" tid bits from that one!  And they fill the time quite  
nicely, even on a very short trip to lunch or whatever.  :-)

Here ya go... my list minus a few new ones I'm trying out that I've  
not posted anywhere yet.

http://www.natetech.com/?p=241

27 miles each way but I also have the Ham Radio in the Jeep... so it's  
always a dilemma... talk to buddies on the radio and entertain myself,  
or fire up the iPod connector into the stereo and listen to  
podcasts... only if I'm interested in traffic reports or boring talk  
show hosts do I turn on the broadcast receiver anymore, it seems...  
that and Denver football/baseball games live, if I'm out and about  
while they're playing.

And the traffic reports could come from a newer GPS, if I wasn't a  
cheapskate and keep clinging to my Garmin GPS V I paid $100 for two or  
three years ago, as if it's not already completely outdated and  
slow... heh.  (Mostly holding on to it because when you commute as far  
as I do, the GPS is relatively worthless... there's only one major way  
to get to and from where I'm going all the way across the city, and  
the only other way around is another 15-20 miles out of the way.  That  
and I have all the accessory cables and what-not for it... something  
that would certainly cost extra with a newer model...)

--
Nate Duehr
spamBeGonenateSTOPspamspamEraseMEnatetech.com



2008\01\04@011620 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
face

On Jan 3, 2008, at 11:00 PM, Nate Duehr wrote:
>
> bills.  (It was #253, "The Middle of Nowhere")   I'm getting that one
> via the iTunes RSS feed, but they say their website is http://www.thisamericanlife.org
>  -- haven't been there yet, though.


p.s. #116 "Poultry Slam" was hilarious and entertaining, too.

Crud, I just realized the tag on this is EE.  Sorry folks.

--
Nate Duehr
KILLspamnatespamBeGonespamnatetech.com



2008\01\04@012343 by Denny Esterline

picon face
On 1/3/08, M. Adam Davis <EraseMEstienmanspamEraseMEgmail.com> wrote:
>
> On 12/28/07, Nate Duehr <@spam@nate@spam@spamspam_OUTnatetech.com> wrote:
> > Just tonight, I was listening to a podcast about someone looking for
> > nitrates in the late 1800's literally walking by the richest nitrate-
> > laden ore sample ever found every day -- which was being used at a
> > doorstop for their lab.
>
> Which podcast was that?



I think I heard that some time ago, if I'm not mistaken it was the island of
Naru. Beautiful place, tragic story.

-Denny

2008\01\04@020655 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
face

On Jan 3, 2008, at 11:23 PM, Denny Esterline wrote:

> On 1/3/08, M. Adam Davis <spamBeGonestienmanspamKILLspamgmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> On 12/28/07, Nate Duehr <.....natespam_OUTspamnatetech.com> wrote:
>>> Just tonight, I was listening to a podcast about someone looking for
>>> nitrates in the late 1800's literally walking by the richest  
>>> nitrate-
>>> laden ore sample ever found every day -- which was being used at a
>>> doorstop for their lab.
>>
>> Which podcast was that?
>
>
>
> I think I heard that some time ago, if I'm not mistaken it was the  
> island of
> Naru. Beautiful place, tragic story.


*Was* a beautiful place, you mean.  Yep.  That's it.

The story was done very well, the reporter went to the island looking  
for the "unregulated banks" that Naru is now infamous for hosting.  He  
found a building with nothing but servers running and a cleaning lady  
inside.  Naru is one of the hubs of International money laundering,  
according to the story, anyway... and it's all just a building with  
some servers in it...

Made me wonder if they have to fly in diesel to run them...

--
Nate Duehr
TakeThisOuTnate.....spamTakeThisOuTnatetech.com



2008\01\04@083340 by M. Adam Davis

face picon face
I left it EE on purpose - James repeatedly explains that many OT
things should be in EE because they are of general technical interest,
and I figured technical/science related podcasts fit the bill.  I will
submit myself to the pyre if I'm wrong.  :-)

I listen to this american life occasionally, and find it annoying on
occasion for some reason.  Sometimes good all around, sometimes good
info but annoying to listen to...  I'll check out the episodes you
mentioned though.  My understanding is that they are reasonably
profitable, but they're also trying to launch a video show as well,
which is much more expensive than the existing radio show.  Not sure
where they're trying to sell that...

-Adam

On 1/4/08, Nate Duehr <TakeThisOuTnateKILLspamspamspamnatetech.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -


'[SX] A Complete "microcomputer" with one'
2008\10\24@195108 by green_phantomn/a
flavicon
face
In SX Microcontrollers, SX/B Compiler and SX-Key Tool, green_phantom wrote:

I have been working on a calculator-like hand-held microcomputer project at the beginning of this year with the SX Key Editor in SX/B.  A 10-key numeric, shifting and "command" button keypad encoder, a SERIN/SEROUT network combo, a small 96-byte RAM area; 8 bytes to display data to an 8-digit alpha/numeric serial LED dot-matrix display, 8 bytes for "device number" or "phone number", 16 bytes for text (as if you were displaying text on a 2x8 LCD display) and 64 bytes of "program memory."  I have found a collection of 8-digit, 5 x 7 dot matrix serial displays at Newark and Jameco.  Be sure to look up the first 4 alpha-numeric characters of the item manufacturer number: HCMS and the other 4 digits, 291X (X = 1 to 5, 6 or 9) or 297X.  Be on the lookout for HCMS-2919 and HCMS-2976 displays!  These generate a shiny blue color for each pixel but they are pricey!  X = 1 for yellow LEDs, 2 for "High-Efficiency" Red, 3 for green, 4 for orange and 5 for low-output red.  6 and 9 are GaN Blue.  I have been in the process of editing the "program" language which I call "PhantAsm."  Values 0 to 255 are used, each with its own "mnemonic."  After I test the display and the SX program I have compiled up to now, this device could be programmed for use as a vintage "Stop, Thief!" board game "Crime Scanner" or a vintage LED "football" hand-held game!  I developed two different ASCII character display maps; one 64-character alphanumeric system and one 128-character 7-segment LED display emulation format.  The latters lights up the "decimal point dot" for values greater than 0 to 127.  Both are hexadecimal-ASCII-coded, like the Nintendo Entertainment System console motherboard character ROMs.  Unlike the traditional ASCII character maps that designate the numbers 0 to 9 as character codes 48 to 57, numbers 0 to 9 here start at ASCII code value of 0.  This means that of the character codes 0 to 63 for the 64-character alphanumeric format or 0 to 127 for the 7-segment-emulated character set, numbers 0 to 9 start at 0 to 9, followed by the letters A to Z, so that the SX28-based source code can recognize the hexadecimal characters as 0 to 9 and A to F when displayed on the HCMS-series serial dot-matrix display.  You will need to download the data sheets for the HCMS-291X and HCMS-297X series devices at www.jameco.com and www.newark.com.  To prevent LED burnouts on the display, the devices have a special control RAM and ROM that sets the LED light intensity to 80% of its maximm capacity.  A resistor connected to the BLANK pin on the display package tied to GND allows you to manually, by hardware method, control the intensity of the LED display.  My SX/B program code even includes a small piece of code within the "program language" section of the source code to drive a piezo speaker for sound feedback!  The project is still in the works.   I never tested it yet but so far I have been reading and reviewing the instructions in the HCMS-series display data sheets.

Green Phantom
---------- End of Message ----------

You can view the post on-line at:
http://forums.parallax.com/forums/default.aspx?f=7&p=1&m=302919
Need assistance? Send an email to the Forum Administrator at forumadmin@parallax.com
The Parallax Forums are powered by dotNetBB Forums, copyright 2002-2008 (http://www.dotNetBB.com)

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2008 , 2009 only
- Today
- New search...