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'[PIC]: PIC based STEPLESS pwr stepper control kit'
2002\09\23@193617 by James Newton, webhost

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I'm so excited about this I don't even know where to start... Roman Black
has donated his Linistepper kit to PICList.com to help out hobbyist builders
and to raise some money to help with the costs of the web site, etc... and
we have decided to start selling them at an introductory price of only
$30/each or 75$ for three.

This is a professional quality system at a hobby price. Check out these
features:

Full to 18th over micro stepping and linear ramping. So with a standard 200
step per revolution motor you get:
* 200 step - full step
* 400 step - high-torque half step (EXCUSIVE FEATURE)
* 1200 step - micro step 6th!
* 3600 step - micro step 18th!
* ???? step - Linear ramping STEPLESS (EXCLUSIVE FEATURE)

Special modes (hard to find in any other controller):
* Special high-torque half-stepping mode
www.piclist.com/io/stepper/linistep/halfstep
* Linear ramping stepless modes
www.piclist.com/io/stepper/linistep/lini_wks.htm#Ramping
* low power "hold" mode and change modes on the FLY!
http://www.piclist.com/io/stepper/linistep/lini_use#changemode

Other Features:
* On-board PIC chip + free source code (OPEN SOURCE) and the circuit is on
the site as well, so you can make your own if you have the parts in stock
and can make your own PCB. The kit price is so good I don't think it will be
worth it for most.
* Rugged 5A 100v transistors. Best suited for up to 1.5A /phase motors (Up
to 2.5A/phase with some changes)
* 72mm x 50mm board size. Heat sinks will be required for operation.
* PSU voltage 4v to 35v. Requires motor voltage and regulated +5v
* Constant current linear unipolar STEPLESS OPERATION, linear current
smoothing. Motors run cooler and can be smooth even at very low speeds.
* "standard" step + direction inputs, in addition to mode and high/low
power.

Please note: UNIPOLAR motors only (needs a 5,6 or 8 wire motor): Bipolar (4
wire) motors are NOT supported. And because it is a linear and not a
chopper, the motor will run cooler but BIG heat sinks will be required on
the controller for high power operation.  Yes, some people want chopper vs.
linear and some people need bipolar support. Look elsewhere. This isn't
that.

Roman has completely documented the theory of operation and design tradeoffs
so it is easy to understand an make changes to fine tune the unit to your
needs:
www.piclist.com/io/stepper/linistep/lini_wks
All PIC source code is provided, suits 16F84 and 16F628 (the 16F628 /20mHz
chip is supplied ALREADY PROGRAMMED with the kit)!

And his "how to use it" page is so good, it is going to help a lot of people
make use of steppers whether they get this kit or not.
http://www.piclist.com/io/stepper/linistep/lini_use

Pat Roman on the back for this nice design and for contributing so much to
support our list.

---
James Newton, webhost piclist.com (former Admin #3)
spam_OUTjamesnewtonTakeThisOuTspampiclist.com 1-619-652-0593 fax:1-208-279-8767
PIC/PICList FAQ: http://www.piclist.com or .org

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2002\09\23@222737 by Roman Black

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James Newton, webhost wrote:

www.piclist.com/io/stepper/linistep/lini_wks
> I'm so excited about this I don't even know where to start...
> * Constant current linear unipolar STEPLESS OPERATION, linear current
> smoothing. Motors run cooler and can be smooth even at very low speeds.
> * "standard" step + direction inputs, in addition to mode and high/low
> power.


Wow! Thanks for the nice words James, and it's great
to see the project got this far. The stepper driver
works pretty good. :o)

The ability to do fine microstepping (3600 steps/rev)
and infinite angle control should make these boards
popular with the astronomy crowd. Or maybe the schools
as 3600 is 0.1 degree steps, good for calculations...

Then again maybe we are the only 2 people who wanted
cheap rugged microstepping drivers?? ;o)
-Roman

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2002\09\23@230128 by gaston gagnon

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Roman Black a écrit :

{Quote hidden}

No, your are not the only two, I just put an order for 3 units. :o)
Gaston

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2002\09\24@141450 by Peter L. Peres

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On Tue, 24 Sep 2002, Roman Black wrote:

*>The ability to do fine microstepping (3600 steps/rev)
*>and infinite angle control should make these boards
*>popular with the astronomy crowd. Or maybe the schools
*>as 3600 is 0.1 degree steps, good for calculations...

What is infinte angle control ?

Peter

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2002\09\26@093918 by Roman Black

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Peter L. Peres wrote:
>

> *>The ability to do fine microstepping (3600 steps/rev)
> *>and infinite angle control should make these boards
> *>popular with the astronomy crowd. Or maybe the schools
> *>as 3600 is 0.1 degree steps, good for calculations...
>
> What is infinite angle control ?


As the PIC has total control of the current in each
of the two motor phases you can PWM these in PIC
software to give "infinite angle control".

Imagine a cheap handy application like a CCD camera
glued on the end of a small stepper motor shaft.
The tiny cheap motors are only 24 steps/rotation,
which is pretty lousy camera positioning.

But with the new linistepper board you get 18th
microstepping as a standard mode, that is 24 x 18
= 432 steps to a rotation. Now the camera pan mount
is looking viable, and with PIC control able to
add fine adjustment, trim or whatever you want to
call it.

You could rotate the stepper only one turn every day,
by changing the pwm mathematically in incredibly small
steps and keeping the error value. Which is why I
mentioned the astronomy crowd, they spend huge efforts
making specialised mechanical mounts, that can in some
part be replaced by a stepper that can move very slowly
controlled mathematically.

The linistepper is not the ultimate high power stepper
driver board, but it is versatile and performs very
well for such a cheap microstepping driver. And sales
of the linistepper provide some income for the Piclist.
Is that an [AD]?? ;o)
-Roman

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2002\09\26@095234 by llile

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Well these microstepping drivers sound great in theory, but after having
worked developing one, they are not all they are cracked up to be.  Of
course, it is possible to microstep between steps by varying the current
to each winding.  But depending on the stepper motor you use, you may find
these microsteps to be not very linear.  We worked hard to get a
microstepper to smoothly pan a motor for a camera, only to find
nonlinearities int he motor's microstepping response made this quite
difficult.  never did really get it to go smoothly.


-- Lawrence Lile





Roman Black <EraseMEfastvidspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTEZY.NET.AU>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <PICLISTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
09/26/02 08:33 AM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     @spam@PICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [PIC]: PIC based STEPLESS pwr stepper control kit


Peter L. Peres wrote:
>

> *>The ability to do fine microstepping (3600 steps/rev)
> *>and infinite angle control should make these boards
> *>popular with the astronomy crowd. Or maybe the schools
> *>as 3600 is 0.1 degree steps, good for calculations...
>
> What is infinite angle control ?


As the PIC has total control of the current in each
of the two motor phases you can PWM these in PIC
software to give "infinite angle control".

Imagine a cheap handy application like a CCD camera
glued on the end of a small stepper motor shaft.
The tiny cheap motors are only 24 steps/rotation,
which is pretty lousy camera positioning.

But with the new linistepper board you get 18th
microstepping as a standard mode, that is 24 x 18
= 432 steps to a rotation. Now the camera pan mount
is looking viable, and with PIC control able to
add fine adjustment, trim or whatever you want to
call it.

You could rotate the stepper only one turn every day,
by changing the pwm mathematically in incredibly small
steps and keeping the error value. Which is why I
mentioned the astronomy crowd, they spend huge efforts
making specialised mechanical mounts, that can in some
part be replaced by a stepper that can move very slowly
controlled mathematically.

The linistepper is not the ultimate high power stepper
driver board, but it is versatile and performs very
well for such a cheap microstepping driver. And sales
of the linistepper provide some income for the Piclist.
Is that an [AD]?? ;o)
-Roman

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ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.

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2002\09\26@095237 by cdb

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Now all we need is for someone to convert it into a pic based PCB
milling/drilling machine and we're rolling.

Colin
--
cdb, KILLspambodgy1KILLspamspamoptusnet.com.au on 26/09/2002

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2002\09\26@105528 by Roman Black

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llile@SALTONUSA.COM wrote:
>
> Well these microstepping drivers sound great in theory, but after having
> worked developing one, they are not all they are cracked up to be.  Of
> course, it is possible to microstep between steps by varying the current
> to each winding.  But depending on the stepper motor you use, you may find
> these microsteps to be not very linear.  We worked hard to get a
> microstepper to smoothly pan a motor for a camera, only to find
> nonlinearities int he motor's microstepping response made this quite
> difficult.  never did really get it to go smoothly.


Yes there are angular errors in the motor itself.
Some are repetetive and can be tuned out but there
is always some random error (and friction) too.
But one advantage of having a PIC on board is that you
can tune the software step sizes to suit that motor, ie
stick a laser diode on the shaft and start drawing
pencil lines on the wall. And that gets about as
"smooth" as steppers go. :o)
-Roman

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'[PIC]: PIC based STEPLESS pwr stepper control kit'
2002\10\11@143219 by James Williams
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I would like to know how you can get 3600 steps/rev.  Because standard step
angle of 1.8 degrees with microstepping yields the following steps/rev
MicS    Full/faction
1/2:    200/.5  = 400 steps/rev
1/4:    200/.25 = 800 steps/rev
1/8:    200/.125        = 1600 steps/rev
1/16:   200/.0625       = 3200 steps/rev
1/32:   200/.03125      = 6400 steps/rev
1/64:   200/.015625 = 12800 steps/rev

Regards,

James

{Original Message removed}

2002\10\11@151326 by Roman Black

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James Williams wrote:
>
> I would like to know how you can get 3600 steps/rev.  Because standard step
> angle of 1.8 degrees with microstepping yields the following steps/rev
> MicS    Full/faction
> 1/2:    200/.5  = 400 steps/rev
> 1/4:    200/.25 = 800 steps/rev
> 1/8:    200/.125        = 1600 steps/rev
> 1/16:   200/.0625       = 3200 steps/rev
> 1/32:   200/.03125      = 6400 steps/rev
> 1/64:   200/.015625 = 12800 steps/rev


Hi James, you can get any number of steps you desire.
Stepper motors are a 2-phase 90' system, and can be
configured to any microstep system that divides by
200, ie divides by full step.

It is more common to use binary divisible steps but it
does not have to be that way. One popular driver uses
2000 steps/rev, my driver uses 1200 and 3600 steps/rev.
:o)
-Roman

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2002\10\11@152359 by Roman Black
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> It is more common to use binary divisible steps but it
> does not have to be that way. One popular driver uses
> 2000 steps/rev, my driver uses 1200 and 3600 steps/rev.

Whoops! Forgot to mention that there are big benefits
to NOT using binary divisible stepper modes as the
(bad) resonances are all based on the binary divisible
nature of the motor poles. Using stepper modes based on
prime numbers; like 2000 (/5) or 1200 and 3600 (/3)
give much better motor performance in regard to
resonance problems.
-Roman

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