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PICList Thread
'[PIC]: Master list of Microchip publications'
2005\08\08@091756 by John Nall

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It would be nice to have a master list of just what all the documents
are (by name) which are located at
http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/.  Is anyone aware of
whether or not such a list exists for use by people outside of Microchip?

John

2005\08\09@172702 by Herman Aalderink

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John Nall wrote:

> It would be nice to have a master list of just what all the documents
> are (by name) which are located at
> http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/.  Is anyone aware of
> whether or not such a list exists for use by people outside of Microchip?
>
> John

I have no access : (what could be the reason?)


 Directory Listing Denied

This Virtual Directory does not allow contents to be listed.

Herman in PHL.

2005\08\09@182157 by John Nall

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Herman Aalderink wrote:

> I have no access : (what could be the reason?)
>
>  Directory Listing Denied


Well, no, you cannot just go to that directory.  :-)  But that is where
most, if not all, of the Microchip documents are stored, and you can
download them from the directory (obviously).  Some of them have names
attached to the pdf files, whereas others just have a number.  (I
suspect it is the "DS" number but am not sure.  The ones with names also
have numbers appended to the names.)

For example, I have decided to go ahead and try the C30 compiler for 60
days free (probably cannot afford to buy it unless I can find someone
who is selling it really cheap, however).  So I went to the Microchip
website, found the C30 User Guide, and by examining the properties of
the cute little symbol for a pdf file, got the true name of the file.  
(I could have just clicked on the icon and in theory my browser would
have downloaded the pdf file.  But theory and practice seem to differ,
and that does not work more than it does work).  So, in Linux, "wget
http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/51284.pdf" downloaded it
in just a jiffy.

However, as you point out, one cannot go to the directory and just
browse and see what all is in there.  :-(  I would like to know.  Which
is why I raised the issue.

John

2005\08\09@184654 by Jan-Erik Soderholm

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John Nall wrote :

> So, in Linux, "wget
> http://ww1.microchip.
com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/51284.pdf"
> downloaded it  in just a
jiffy.
>
> However, as you point out, one cannot go to the directory
and just
> browse and see what all is in there.


And what whould you
do with a long list of, let's say
500-1000 filenames with just 5 digits
in them ?

How would you know what's in each file ?
Download them all ?

I don't get it.

Jan-Erik.



2005\08\09@190127 by John Nall

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Jan-Erik Soderholm wrote:

>> And what whould you
>do with a long list of, let's say
>500-1000 filenames with just 5 digits
>in them ?
>
>How would you know what's in each file ?
>Download them all ?
>
>I don't get it.
>  
>

I'm shocked that you didn't have a smiley-face with that, Jan-Erik!  Of
course no one could possibly want a long list of 500-1000 filenames with
just 5 digits in them!  That is not what the OP asked for (the OP being
me).  Somewhere there is a document which does a one-to-one mapping from
a document number to what that document is.  I asked if anyone knew of
such a document (outside of Microchip -- clearly they have such a
thing).  And the only response was from the person who said he could not
access the directory.

John

2005\08\09@190509 by Nate Duehr

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On Wed, Aug 10, 2005 at 12:46:54AM +0200, Jan-Erik Soderholm wrote:
> And what whould you
> do with a long list of, let's say
> 500-1000 filenames with just 5 digits
> in them ?
>
> How would you know what's in each file ?
> Download them all ?
>
> I don't get it.
>
> Jan-Erik.

Sometimes spidering such websites is useful for "historical" purposes,
say if a company silently changes a few documents to cover up some
silicon flaw, etc.

I'm not saying that I have the time or inclination to do these things,
but I've seen it used effectively many times for various different
reasons.  wget -r and a large hard disk, and away you go, until you pull
so much stuff you annoy the webmaster.

And of course, James already says this type of activity is inappropriate
for piclist.com -- so don't "go there".

--
Nate Duehr <spam_OUTnateTakeThisOuTspamnatetech.com>

2005\08\09@200124 by John Nall

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Nate Duehr wrote:

> Sometimes spidering such websites is useful for "historical"
> purposes,say if a company silently changes a few documents to cover up
> some silicon flaw, etc.I'm not saying that I have the time or
> inclination to do these things, but I've seen it used effectively many
> times for various different reasons. wget -r and a large hard disk,
> and away you go, until you pul lso much stuff you annoy the webmaster.

Well, yeah, but (a) I don't think it would accomplish what I want, and
(b) I am not into annoying webmasters.  Webmasters are like wizards, in
that they are ". . . subtle, and quick to anger."  :-)

Just let me absolutely clarify that I am only talking about documents
that Microchip makes available to the public.  Not something that is not
meant to be looked at.  I would not try to do that.

>> And of course, James already says this type of activity is inappropriate
>for piclist.com -- so don't "go there".
>
Nope.  James is The Man so far as that issue goes.

John

2005\08\10@005957 by Matt Luckman

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face

Here's a list of chip names to document names I generated from our data,
perhaps that might help:
ftp://ftp.htsoft.com/hitech/docs/piclst.txt


John Nall wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--

-------------------------------
Matt Luckman - HI-TECH Software
http://www.htsoft.com

2005\08\10@013908 by William Chops Westfield

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On Aug 9, 2005, at 3:46 PM, Jan-Erik Soderholm wrote:

> And what whould you do with a long list of, let's say
> 500-1000 filenames with just 5 digits in them ?
>
Put them on a writable website (wiki?) and have the members of the
PICList go through them at the rate of "a few per day" till they
all had one-line descriptions to go with them... (assuming microchip
doesn't have their own master index somewhere...)

BillW

2005\08\10@020109 by Chen Xiao Fan

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Actually the Microchip Technical Library CD-ROM is a very
good archive of all the historical information. The problem
is that we need lots of space for that. :(

To me Microchip has quite good master index for datasheets
and application notes. That is enough for general usages.
But they will not keep the old index in the website (sure
they will keep those thing internally). Still I think it is
good enough to keep the CD-ROMs or better to keep them
in a safer place.

Regards,
Xiaofan

{Original Message removed}

2005\08\10@035851 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>It would be nice to have a master list of just what
>all the documents are (by name) which are located at
>ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/.
>Is anyone aware of whether or not such a list exists
>for use by people outside of Microchip?

Not really sure why one would go this way to get at documents. I always go
through the "front door" of the website, and look through the list of app
notes, or go through the appropriate chip or software support page to get
datasheets and manuals.

Then when I download the document I make sure I add the part number or some
other description so I can find it again.

2005\08\10@132847 by G Minch

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Notice that when you look at a document on Microchip's site, part of the URL includes "/stellent/." Stellent is the document check-in/retrieval software.  When users check in a document, they type the metadata that identifies the doc. Then Stellent assigns a cryptic name to the file and stores it in an archive directory. When you search for a document on Microchip's site, you are talking to the Stellent software.

Stellent uses a MS SQL Server database to store the metadata and file locations. It is possible to query the Stellent database and get an x-ref list of document titles (from the metadata) and their physical filenames. This has to be done by whoever manages the Stellent installation at Microchip. If someone were to ask nicely, perhaps the webmaster at Microchip could be pursuaded to peform this query. I think I'd ask in one of Microchip's forums that are monitored by employees.

The list of publications that is actually available to the *public* may be only a subset of the total. Whether or not the master list can be produced so as to list only public documents depends on how the site is organized, and whether or not they are collecting metadata to identify a document as public or internal use only. It may not be possible to easily produce the master list that Neal wants, depending on what metadata is collected during check in.

Note, I know nothing about Stellent other than what I've related here. However, one of my cow-orkers is the guy who manages the Stellent installation for the website of the company where I work. I related Neal's question to him, and he told me how the document retrieval works and how one would go about getting a "master list" of publications.

- Glenn Minch

>It would be nice to have a master list of just what
>all the documents are (by name) which are located at
>ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/.
>Is anyone aware of whether or not such a list exists
>for use by people outside of Microchip?

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