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PICList Thread
'[PIC]: How to work with PIC Demo Boards'
2004\06\11@084502 by Lindy Mayfield

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How do people normally work with the IO ports on PIC demo boards?  I have been soldering wires from the ports on the demo board and plugging them into a bread board as needed.  Is this correct, or is there a better way?

The board looks strange with all those wires hanging from it.  
Thanks,
Lindy
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2004\06\11@091954 by Bob Axtell

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The BEST way to use the demo boards is to install 0.025"sq .1"ctr strips
  into the active IO port holes, then use wirewrapped connections.

Most people today are unfamiliar with wirewrap, but the method is a very
reliable way to make temporary, reuseable connections. This makes the
demo cards endlessly reuseable; I have some from 10 years ago, as
pristine today as the day I bought them.

You can google up wirewrap tools and sources.

--Bob



Lindy Mayfield wrote:
> How do people normally work with the IO ports on PIC demo boards?  I have been soldering wires from the ports on the demo board and plugging them into a bread board as needed.  Is this correct, or is there a better way?
>
> The board looks strange with all those wires hanging from it.
>
> Thanks,
> Lindy
>

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      --------------
        Bob Axtell
PIC Hardware & Firmware Dev
  http://beam.to/baxtell
      1-520-219-2363

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2004\06\11@101920 by Matthew Brush

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I got a (cheapo) manual wire-wrap tool and a spool of wire-wrap wire for
under $15.00CAD at RadioShack.  I have become a HUGE fan of wire-wrapping in
last little while.

My $0.02 ... Peace

MJ Brush

{Original Message removed}

2004\06\11@101921 by Michael Olson

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Well, I agree with the 0.1" strips (go on eBay and find someone selling
a bag of the breakaway ones cheap, you'll use them often) but I prefer
using jumper cables from there to the solderless breadboard. Just take a
peice of wire and put a high density D-Sub pin on one side and high
denisty D-Sub socket on the other. Don't use regular D-Sub parts, the
regular pins are a bit big for breadboards (although I can attest they
will fit, they're just big) and the regular sockets won't grip the
header pins. This is also a good way to connect IDC connectors to a
breadboard.

Examples:
  www.cs.odu.edu/~olson/piclist/RibbonEnds.jpg
  http://www.cs.odu.edu/~olson/piclist/PinsToBreadboard.jpg

As a note, the ribbon cable done like that is occasionlly very useful
for keeping things neat, I'd probably use individual wires for a demo
board. I highly recommend the shrink tube as well.

You can also use a 0.1" header connector on one end (those are actually
meant to connect to the pins). It's also possible to put a 0.1" header
onto your breadboard by getting one of the 90 degree connectors and
straightening out the pins. I don't like doing that because they also
seem to be right on the board of what a solderless breadboard can
handle, although I've been know to do it to provide an easy hookup for a
ICSP.

-- Michael Olson

Bob Axtell wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2004\06\11@183330 by Andrew Warren
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Bob Axtell <spam_OUTPICLISTTakeThisOuTspammitvma.mit.edu> wrote:

> Most people today are unfamiliar with wirewrap, but the method is
> a very reliable way to make temporary, reuseable connections.

   ... and not-so-temporary connections, as well.

   Proper wirewrapping is more reliable, in most situations, than
   soldered connections.  The US military, in fact, is still using
   boards that were wirewrapped during World War II.

   -Andy

=== Andrew Warren -- .....aiwKILLspamspam@spam@cypress.com
=== Principal Design Engineer
=== Cypress Semiconductor Corporation
===
=== Opinions expressed above do not
=== necessarily represent those of
=== Cypress Semiconductor Corporation

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