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'[PIC]: Converting PIC outputs to CMOS 4000 compati'
2004\02\05@075536 by Mccauley, Daniel H

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Anyone have an idea of how to properly (or simply) convert the outputs
of a PIC so that they can interface with 4000 series CMOS logic?
I tried searching the FAQ, but really couldn't find anything.

Is it as simple as adding an open collector output pulled up to the
voltage my CMOS 4000 logic is running at??

Any help appreciated.
Thanks

Dan


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2004\02\05@080821 by Rick C.

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If the cmos (4000) power is 5 volts, then nothing is required. If cmos is
other than 5 volts, then you are correct.
Rick

"Mccauley, Daniel H" wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2004\02\05@081443 by Olin Lathrop

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Mccauley, Daniel H wrote:
> Anyone have an idea of how to properly (or simply) convert the outputs
> of a PIC so that they can interface with 4000 series CMOS logic?

Just connect them as long as the PIC and CMOS logic are running at the same
supply voltage.  What voltage are the two running at?


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2004\02\05@084015 by Mccauley, Daniel H

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The CMOS chips will be running at 15V while the PIC is at 5V.
Thanks
Dan


> Anyone have an idea of how to properly (or simply) convert the outputs

> of a PIC so that they can interface with 4000 series CMOS logic?

Just connect them as long as the PIC and CMOS logic are running at the
same supply voltage.  What voltage are the two running at?


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2004\02\05@084638 by Mike Harrison

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On Thu, 5 Feb 2004 08:39:25 -0500, you wrote:

>The CMOS chips will be running at 15V while the PIC is at 5V.
>Thanks
>Dan

In which case you can't use an 'open-collector' PIC pin pulled up to +15V as the earlier post
implies, as the PIC's input diode will pull it down to +5V.
The simplest way would be an external transistor (or FET) with a collector pullup to +15V
For CMOS to PIC you can use a resistive divider.

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2004\02\05@095747 by Olin Lathrop

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Mccauley, Daniel H wrote:
> The CMOS chips will be running at 15V while the PIC is at 5V.

There are level converter chips for this purpose.  That's probably the best
answer if there are a lot of lines that need to be converted.

Otherwise, the simplest do it yourself method is probably a logic level N
channel FET and pullup resistor.  You can do it with an NPN transistor too,
but it requires an additional base transistor.  Both these methods invert,
and the output fall time will be fast but the rise time dependent on the
pullup resistor.


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2004\02\05@100206 by Alan B. Pearce
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>Otherwise, the simplest do it yourself method is probably a logic
>level N channel FET and pullup resistor.  You can do it with an
>NPN transistor too, but it requires an additional base transistor.
                                                       ^^^^^^^^^^

I think you meant resistor :))

The conversion chips for driving out from the PIC are CD4049 or CD4050
depending on non-inverting or inverting are better suited to your
requirements. If you want to come the other way then resistors should suit,
but if you want bi-directional then it gets trickier.

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2004\02\05@100618 by Olin Lathrop

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Alan B. Pearce wrote:
>> Otherwise, the simplest do it yourself method is probably a logic
>> level N channel FET and pullup resistor.  You can do it with an
>> NPN transistor too, but it requires an additional base transistor.
>                                                         ^^^^^^^^^^
>
> I think you meant resistor :))

Oops.

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2004\02\05@100620 by

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Olin Lathrop wrote :

> Otherwise, the simplest do it yourself method is probably a
> logic level N channel FET and pullup resistor.  You can do
> it with an NPN  transistor too, but it requires an additional
> base transistor.


"base *resistor*", not ?  :-) :-)

Jan-Erik.

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2004\02\05@105748 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 07:54 AM 2/5/2004 -0500, you wrote:
>Anyone have an idea of how to properly (or simply) convert the outputs
>of a PIC so that they can interface with 4000 series CMOS logic?
>I tried searching the FAQ, but really couldn't find anything.
>
>Is it as simple as adding an open collector output pulled up to the
>voltage my CMOS 4000 logic is running at??

A 4049/4050 (Vdd=5V) will convert from the 4000 CMOS to PIC.
(inverting / non-inverting hex buffer)

A MC14504 will convert from PIC to 4000 CMOS
(hex level shifter). It can go the other way too, but the
4040/50 are cheaper.

This is convenient (no extra parts, 6 lines per SOIC).

For just one or two lines, if speed and power consumption are
unimportant, an open drain/collector inverter as others have
described is more than okay.

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
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2004\02\05@145712 by Dwayne Reid

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At 05:54 AM 2/5/2004, Mccauley, Daniel H wrote:
>Anyone have an idea of how to properly (or simply) convert the outputs
>of a PIC so that they can interface with 4000 series CMOS logic?
>I tried searching the FAQ, but really couldn't find anything.
>
>Is it as simple as adding an open collector output pulled up to the
>voltage my CMOS 4000 logic is running at??

What voltage is the 4000 series CMOS operating from?

dwayne

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