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'[PIC]: Ceramic Resonators'
2000\11\09@143943 by Dr. Chris Kirtley

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Dear all,

I'm looking for a 10MHz ceramic resonator. Unfortunatley, they all seem
to be quite sizeable. I want to keep the tihickness of my circuit down
to 3mm but they all seem to be at least 4-5 mm. Anybody know of one that
is thinner/smaller?

Chris
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NIDRR Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on TeleRehabilitation
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Catholic University of America
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2000\11\09@144329 by Andrew Kunz

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I use Murata Erie parts from FAI.  You might need to move to real xtals, though.

Andy

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2000\11\09@160527 by Brent Crosby

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The Murata CSTCC  part with built-in load caps is 1.75mm tall:

http://www.murata.com/murata/weblibrary.nsf/a4defd247cf5a0ae852567c90057f586/b5087df06c4c8065852568e9003e2285!OpenDocument

At 11:44 AM 11/9/00, you wrote:
>I use Murata Erie parts from FAI.  You might need to move to real xtals,
>though.
>
>Andy


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2000\11\09@210624 by Russell McMahon

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>I'm looking for a 10MHz ceramic resonator. Unfortunatley, they all seem
>to be quite sizeable. I want to keep the tihickness of my circuit down
>to 3mm but they all seem to be at least 4-5 mm. Anybody know of one that
>is thinner/smaller?


You could consider lying one on its side.

Also, some crystals are lower in height than this (but probably still > 3mm.

RM

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2000\11\10@005904 by w. v. ooijen / f. hanneman

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Modern floppy drives often contain crystals that are 3 mm high.
But I have no idea who makes those.
Wouter

----------
{Quote hidden}

3mm.
{Quote hidden}

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2000\11\10@034622 by staff

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Dr. Chris Kirtley wrote:
>
> Dear all,
>
> I'm looking for a 10MHz ceramic resonator. Unfortunatley, they all seem
> to be quite sizeable. I want to keep the tihickness of my circuit down
> to 3mm but they all seem to be at least 4-5 mm. Anybody know of one that
> is thinner/smaller?
>
> Chris

Hi Dr.Chris, the smallest I have found that are reliable are the Murata
brand CSA 2-pin "blob" resonators. You can lay them down and they are
3.7mm thick, 8mm wide, and about 8mm across.

If you cut a hole in the circuit board, you can lay the resonator
down in it for maybe 1mm to 2mm thickness. Some commercial apps
do stuff like this.

If size is really an issue you can use the RC osc with ceramic
capacitor,
will be very thin. There will be small frequency drift, but if you use
decent earth planes on your circuit board and maybe some tinfoil over
the top you can keep freq drift <2%.
-Roman

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2000\11\10@042840 by Alan B. Pearce

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>I'm looking for a 10MHz ceramic resonator. Unfortunatley, they all seem
>to be quite sizeable. I want to keep the tihickness of my circuit down
>to 3mm but they all seem to be at least 4-5 mm. Anybody know of one that
>is thinner/smaller?

I have just had a new items thing across my desk about some new resonators from
Murata. I do not have it to hand, but it gave the impression that they were
surface mount size, and could include capacitors if needed. If you need more
info I could get it tomorrow.

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2000\11\10@062250 by mike

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On Thu, 9 Nov 2000 14:31:18 -0500, you wrote:

>Dear all,
>
>I'm looking for a 10MHz ceramic resonator. Unfortunatley, they all seem
>to be quite sizeable. I want to keep the tihickness of my circuit down
>to 3mm but they all seem to be at least 4-5 mm. Anybody know of one that
>is thinner/smaller?
Kyocera do a SMD 3-terminal 10M resonator pbrc-10.0BR (Farnell
648-164) Size is not entirely clear from my catalogue , but others in
this series are about 2mm high

BC Components /Saronix do a 10MHz crystal 1.3mm high partno
NKS7-100-20 (Farnell 329-8346)

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2000\11\10@154013 by Dr. Chris Kirtley

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Thanks for all the tips on ceramic resonators. I'm now having second
thoughts. I had assumed that ceramic resonators were as fast as RC
oscillators to wake up from sleep, but somebody told me that they are
crystals. Which is correct?

TIA!

Chris
--
Dr. Chris Kirtley MD PhD
Associate Professor
HomeCare Technologies for the 21st Century (Whitaker Foundation)
NIDRR Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on TeleRehabilitation
Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Pangborn 105B
Catholic University of America
620 Michigan Ave NE
Washington, DC 20064
Tel. 202-319-6247,  fax 202-319-4287
Email: kirtleyspamspam_OUTcua.edu
http://engineering.cua.edu/biomedical

Clinical Gait Analysis: http://guardian.curtin.edu.au/cga
Send subscribe/unsubscribe to @spam@listprocKILLspamspaminfo.curtin.edu.au

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2000\11\10@155040 by M. Adam Davis

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Ceramic resonators are not crystals, but they take about as long to start
up as a crystal does.

-Adam

"Dr. Chris Kirtley" wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2000\11\10@174530 by Mark Walsh

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Actually they start up about an order of magnitude faster than a crystal
oscillator running at the same frequency.  Depending on the application,
that is about the same time as a crystal.  The rise time is largely a
function of frequency and load capacitance.  I use a resonator with an AVR
circuit specifically because it starts up in about 100 uSec where a crystal
was taking milliseconds.  If this is still too slow and the frequency
accuracy you need isn't important, then use the RC.

Check this link from ECS crystals:

http://www.ecsxtal.com/pdf/cer_prin.pdf

Mark Walsh



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2000\11\10@204332 by Dwayne Reid

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At 03:38 PM 11/10/00 -0500, Dr. Chris Kirtley wrote:
>Thanks for all the tips on ceramic resonators. I'm now having second
>thoughts. I had assumed that ceramic resonators were as fast as RC
>oscillators to wake up from sleep, but somebody told me that they are
>crystals. Which is correct?

They behave like crystals with very low Q - as such, they reach maximum
amplitude much quicker than crystals.  But keep in mind that you are faced
with a minimum 1024 cycle delay whenever you use either the XT or HS settings.

dwayne



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2000\11\11@030304 by Steve Smith

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In a message dated 10/11/00 20:43:05 GMT Standard Time, kirtleyEraseMEspam.....CUA.EDU
writes:

<<  I had assumed that ceramic resonators were as fast as RC
oscillators to wake up from sleep, but somebody told me that they are
crystals. Which is correct? >>
They are slow like crystals

Cheers Steve.....

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2000\11\11@070815 by mike

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On Fri, 10 Nov 2000 15:50:22 -0500, you wrote:

>Ceramic resonators are not crystals, but they take about as long to start
>up as a crystal does.
>
>-Adam
If you want fast startup but better than RC stability, it may be
possible to use a delay line instead of a crystal in XT or HS mode.

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