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PICList Thread
'[PIC]: Anyone using Microchip USB parts?'
2005\06\20@235956 by Charles Craft

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The Microchip USB parts weren't given glowing reviews by the list (last year?).

Is anyone using the PIC16C745/765 or PIC18F2455/2550/4455/4550 parts in production?

I'm looking to build a very simple sensor->PIC->USB->HIL device for a Linux server.
PICs are (for the most part) easy to work with and I'd like to stick with them.

For a very simple couple bytes/minute type app, am I going wrong using the USB PICs?

Cost is important so the FTDI modules aren't on option.
Looks like the 16C745 is under $3 now.

thanks
chuckc



2005\06\21@051033 by Chen Xiao Fan

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I think not many people would like to deal with OTP
parts or windows EPROM part any more. That is the
problem with PIC16C745. PICkit 1 and the mikroe
flash programmer are using 16C745.

PIC18 USB parts are much more popular now but they
are quite new and there are not enough examples.

Regards,
Xiaofan

{Original Message removed}

2005\06\21@103948 by Mike Hord

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> For a very simple couple bytes/minute type app, am
> I going wrong using the USB PICs?

The only question I have relates to the driver for it.  What
kind of device driver are you using/planning on using?

Mike H.

2005\06\21@105517 by Charles Craft

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Not sure.

Only need to get a couple bytes into a perl script on linux.

Been through most of USB complete (http://www.lvr.com/usb.htm)
and think putting a bare bones driver is doable if none of the existing Linux drivers are a fit.


-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Hord <spam_OUTmike.hordTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com>
Sent: Jun 21, 2005 10:39 AM
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <.....piclistKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu>
Subject: Re: [PIC]: Anyone using Microchip USB parts?

> For a very simple couple bytes/minute type app, am
> I going wrong using the USB PICs?

The only question I have relates to the driver for it.  What
kind of device driver are you using/planning on using?

Mike H.

2005\06\21@120330 by Mike Hord

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> Been through most of USB complete (http://www.lvr.com/usb.htm)
> and think putting a bare bones driver is doable if none of the existing
> Linux drivers are a fit.

Maybe the gameport driver?  Microchip has an appnote surrounding
conversion of a gameport device to USB using the C7x5 USB chips.

Actually, Microchip has several fairly useful appnotes on them, which
one could probably adapt to quite useful devices.  The one I don't
recall seeing is a plain ol' serial port- that'd be REALLY helpful.

Maybe I should go check them out again- I haven't in a while...

Mike H.

2005\06\21@124303 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Actually, Microchip has several fairly useful appnotes on them, which
>one could probably adapt to quite useful devices.  The one I don't
>recall seeing is a plain ol' serial port- that'd be REALLY helpful.

I don't think the 16C745 had a UART, but seem to remember someone saying the
18F ones do. That may be what they are waiting for, as a software UART would
chew up a fair bit of the processing time otherwise.

2005\06\21@130136 by Mark Rages

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On 6/21/05, Charles Craft <chuckseaspamKILLspammindspring.com> wrote:
> Not sure.
>
> Only need to get a couple bytes into a perl script on linux.
>
> Been through most of USB complete (http://www.lvr.com/usb.htm)
> and think putting a bare bones driver is doable if none of the existing Linux drivers are a fit.
>

You want to use libusb.

The PicKit 1 uses the 16C745 chip.  The firmware source is available
on Microchip's website, and there is an open-source programmer which
uses libusb.  Starting from those source codes you could probably get
what you want.

I once used Swig to make a Python wrapper for libusb.  It worked OK.
You might find something similar on CPAN.  It would make the PC side
easy.

The 16C745 isn't a flash part.  You'll have to get a windowed one and
a UV eraser. Alternatively, it looks like the PICDEM Full Speed USB
boards are shipping.  Those have a flash-based 18F4550 and would be
easier to develop on.

Regards,
Mark
markrages@gmail
--
You think that it is a secret, but it never has been one.
 - fortune cookie

2005\06\21@131418 by Bob Barr

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On Tue, 21 Jun 2005 17:42:59 +0100, "Alan B. Pearce" wrote:

>
>I don't think the 16C745 had a UART, but seem to remember someone saying the
>18F ones do. That may be what they are waiting for, as a software UART would
>chew up a fair bit of the processing time otherwise.

The 16C745 and 16C765 both have hardware UARTs.


Regards, Bob

2005\06\21@131835 by Charles Craft

picon face
The 16C parts are half the price of the 18F flash parts.
Hard to build a $5 board with a $6 chip.  :-)

I started with the /JW parts a couple years ago then discovered the 16F84.
Most everything I do is flash now but was really surprised at the price difference in the USB parts.

Thanks for the pointer to the PicKit 1 source code.
I was playing with one last night and figured if the 16C745 can do that it would be fine for my app.

thanks


{Original Message removed}

2005\06\21@140646 by Steven W

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Since we are on the topic already:

I have used the CrystalFontz 635 USB LCD - and it basically has a driver for
windows that lets you access the device as a virtual com port. I haven't
done any USB development before and found that to be an extremely easy to
use interface.

Could anyone point me towards some basic getting started info on how to
interface a USB-Capable PIC 18Fxxx with Windows over USB? Does it require
you to write your own USB-Device driver? Do you have to have a USB VendorID?
How does Plug-and-Play fit into the mix?

Thanks in advance!

-Steve W

{Original Message removed}

2005\06\21@141252 by Mike Hord

picon face
> >Actually, Microchip has several fairly useful appnotes on them, which
> >one could probably adapt to quite useful devices.  The one I don't
> >recall seeing is a plain ol' serial port- that'd be REALLY helpful.
>
> I don't think the 16C745 had a UART, but seem to remember someone saying the
> 18F ones do. That may be what they are waiting for, as a software UART would
> chew up a fair bit of the processing time otherwise.

I was thinking more along the lines of firmware which enumarates as
a serial port, so the data the PIC sends along through the USB shows
up in the PC as though it was coming through a serial port.  No UART
necessary- all the "hard work" is done by the PIC.

Mike H.

2005\06\21@143908 by Jan-Erik Soderholm

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Steven W wrote :

> Could anyone point me towards some
> basic getting
started info on how to
> interface a USB-Capable PIC 18Fxxx
> with
Windows over USB?

Have you seen this one ? :

http://ww1.microchip.
com/downloads/en/AppNotes/00956b.pdf

"Migrating Applications to USB
from RS-232
UART with Minimal Impact on PC Software"


Regards,
Jan-
Erik.



2005\06\21@150127 by Steven W

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That's perfect! Thanks!

-----Original Message-----
From: .....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam.....mit.edu [EraseMEpiclist-bouncesspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu] On Behalf Of
Jan-Erik Soderholm
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2005 2:39 PM
To: piclistspamspam_OUTmit.edu
Subject: RE: [PIC]: Anyone using Microchip USB parts?

Steven W wrote :

> Could anyone point me towards some
> basic getting
started info on how to
> interface a USB-Capable PIC 18Fxxx
> with
Windows over USB?

Have you seen this one ? :

http://ww1.microchip.
com/downloads/en/AppNotes/00956b.pdf

"Migrating Applications to USB
from RS-232
UART with Minimal Impact on PC Software"


Regards,
Jan-
Erik.



2005\06\21@155428 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Jun 21, 2005, at 2:10 AM, Chen Xiao Fan wrote:

> I think not many people would like to deal with OTP
> parts or windows EPROM part any more. That is the
> problem with PIC16C745.

> PIC18 USB parts are much more popular now but they
> are quite new and there are not enough examples.
>
Alas, it doesn't appear that the pic18 USB parts are similar
enough to the PIC16 USB parts that you can do development on
the flash parts and move to the OTPs for "production."

BillW

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