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'[PIC]: Proper handling when mailing programmed ch'
2000\10\02@082246 by Lorick

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As far as maintaining static conscious protective handling of a programmed
PIC, if I want to mail one to someone after it's programmed, would there be
any preference to mounting it on conductive foam vs storing it in those
static protective plastic tubes they are originally shipped in?

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2000\10\02@083321 by Bob Ammerman

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Either should be fine!

What not to do: wrap them in bubble pack. I actually received a couple of
chips in the mail just bundled up inside a ball of bubble pack.

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems
(contract development of high performance, high function, low-level
software)

{Original Message removed}

2000\10\02@090755 by Andy Howard

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Lorick" <.....lorickKILLspamspam@spam@AIR.ON.CA>
To: <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Monday, October 02, 2000 1:23 PM
Subject: [PIC]: Proper handling when mailing programmed chips out?


> As far as maintaining static conscious protective handling of a programmed
> PIC, if I want to mail one to someone after it's programmed, would there
be
> any preference to mounting it on conductive foam vs storing it in those
> static protective plastic tubes they are originally shipped in?

Personally I use tubes because then you can just stuff them in a padded bag
and post them.
If you use foam then it's advisable to box them so they can have some chance
of surviving the mailtruck-driveover test.
You may laugh, I once received a package of /very/ squashed bits with the
tyremark still on it, and the bloody delivery company (Securicor, let's name
the guilty) still tried to deny liability.

Guess which company we've never used since...








.

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2000\10\02@153900 by Dwayne Reid

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At 08:23 AM 10/2/00 -0400, Lorick wrote:
>As far as maintaining static conscious protective handling of a programmed
>PIC, if I want to mail one to someone after it's programmed, would there be
>any preference to mounting it on conductive foam vs storing it in those
>static protective plastic tubes they are originally shipped in?

Yes!  If you ship the chip in foam, there is a very good chance it will
arrive with the leads squashed.  Been there, done that.

I use short sections of plastic IC rail with tape over the ends - have had
no problems to date.

dwayne



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2000\10\02@160716 by Ed Edmondson

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If you use anything but a hard plastic container in a padded envelope marked
"Delicate Instruments" it will always arrive completely compressed.  The US
Postal service has been hired by the IC manufacturers to convert all DIL
packages to SMT packaging. ;-))

I have a whole wall of parts the US Postal service has transformed.  It is
aptly named the US Postal "Wall of Fame!"  There are even a few UPS (Brown
Shirt Nazis) packages there too.

Ed

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2000\10\02@161328 by Chris Carr

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Find a small piece of polystyrene foam, go to kitchen and find the roll of
aluminium foil, liberate a piece sufficient to cover the foam. Cover the
foam. Take the PIC and push its leads through the aluminimum foil into the
foam. Place in Jiffy Bag received with components from your favorite
Distributor.
Seal, Label attach Stamps and mail.

If it costs nowt its the reet price, if it costs owt its expensive

Cheers
Chris

> At 08:23 AM 10/2/00 -0400, Lorick wrote:
> >As far as maintaining static conscious protective handling of a
programmed
> >PIC, if I want to mail one to someone after it's programmed, would there
be
{Quote hidden}

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2000\10\02@161722 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 04:04 PM 10/2/00 EDT, you wrote:
>If you use anything but a hard plastic container in a padded envelope marked
>"Delicate Instruments" it will always arrive completely compressed.  The US
>Postal service has been hired by the IC manufacturers to convert all DIL
>packages to SMT packaging. ;-))

Don't try to slip it into a regular envelope, it seems like the Post Office
uses some kind of equipment with rollers to handle flat mail. If you are
*lucky* the chip just gets flattened. If you use a cheap envelope, it
might get squeezed out the side so an empty envelope with an exit wound
arrives. I have not tried mailer tubes, but they look as if they would
work well. Padded envelopes are not bad.

Best regards,

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2000\10\02@162347 by Severson, Rob

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> If you are
> *lucky* the chip just gets flattened. If you use a cheap envelope, it
> might get squeezed out the side so an empty envelope with an
> exit wound
> arrives.

"Exit wound"! ROTFL!

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2000\10\02@172531 by Tony Nixon

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Lorick wrote:
>
> As far as maintaining static conscious protective handling of a programmed
> PIC, if I want to mail one to someone after it's programmed, would there be
> any preference to mounting it on conductive foam vs storing it in those
> static protective plastic tubes they are originally shipped in?
>
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I always use the portions of the original tubes so that the chips can
handle the "rough" mail handling.

To be on the safe side, I also wrap the tube in antistatic bubble wrap.

Think of the notion "if they can get damaged - they will"

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2000\10\02@174228 by xandinho

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>I have a whole wall of parts the US Postal service has transformed.  It is
>aptly named the US Postal "Wall of Fame!"  There are even a few UPS (Brown
>Shirt Nazis) packages there too.

       HUAHUAHUAHUHAUHAUHA, SS is alive again? The evil SSers against the innocent mail?


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       All the best!!!
       Alexandre Souza
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--------------8<-------Corte aqui-------8<--------------

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2000\10\02@195136 by Mark Willis

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Try this:  Pack it in, let's say, conductive foam (for now.)

Put a couple small pieces of wood in next to it, one on either side.
(Split a 1"x2" chunk in half?  Or route a chip-sized hole into the wood
block.)

Tape into a safe, cohesive whole.  (Leave obvious tags to be merciful to
the recipient;  I detest getting a bubble-wrap package that's next to
impossible to open...)

The wood's pretty much truck-proof (well, mostly.)  I've shipped many
palmtops and chip programmers with wood blocks inside the envelope, no
damage yet.

GOOD idea to tape the envelope/box shut thoroughly, however - Don't
trust Postal Service "self-sealing" boxes to STAY sealed, they almost
always do, but that once is a PAIN.

Can do the same thing with "Popsicle sticks"; they're not as strong as a
wood monoblock.  Also, can take a strip of cardboard and wrap it around
the chip to get the same results.

 Mark

Lorick wrote:
> As far as maintaining static conscious protective handling of a programmed
> PIC, if I want to mail one to someone after it's programmed, would there be
> any preference to mounting it on conductive foam vs storing it in those
> static protective plastic tubes they are originally shipped in?

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2000\10\03@081654 by M. Adam Davis

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The postal service uses machinery to handle all mail thinner than 1/4 inch.  You
must pay an extra 11 cents for mail that is thicker than 1/4 inch.

Flat mail processing involves sending it through a high-speed scanner (the
squisher) and around multiple bends (the bender & squisher part II) of no less
than 9" in diameter.

Make sure you package is blatantly over 1/4", whether it's in an envelope or
box, and it won't be processed this way.  It will be handled by hand through the
entire postal system.

All of this information is available on the usps.gov web site in PDF format, or
you can go to your local post office and request any of their hundreds of
manuals and documents (for free) which tells you what happens to your mail in
terms of bending radius and pressure exerted externally on the mail should your
letter be processed automatically.

-Adam

Ed Edmondson wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2000\10\03@110840 by Dan Michaels

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Adam wrote:
>The postal service uses machinery to handle all mail thinner than 1/4 inch.
You
>must pay an extra 11 cents for mail that is thicker than 1/4 inch.
>
>Flat mail processing involves sending it through a high-speed scanner (the
>squisher) and around multiple bends (the bender & squisher part II) of no less
>than 9" in diameter.
>
>Make sure you package is blatantly over 1/4", whether it's in an envelope or
>box, and it won't be processed this way.  It will be handled by hand
through the
>entire postal system.
.........
>


Most post offices have a slot labelled "non-letters" or "non-flatpacks",
whatever. Since these can be any width, I always assumed if you put
something in there, they were handled by hand rather than machine.

Not even a postal employee would try to force something like that
into the space between 2 rolling pins. Am I wrong? [or do they just
like the sound of bubble pack popping?].

- danM

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2000\10\03@131510 by staff

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M. Adam Davis wrote:
>
> The postal service uses machinery to handle all mail thinner than 1/4 inch.  You
> must pay an extra 11 cents for mail that is thicker than 1/4 inch.
>
> Flat mail processing involves sending it through a high-speed scanner (the
> squisher) and around multiple bends (the bender & squisher part II) of no less
> than 9" in diameter.

The "squisher"!! LOL! Reminds me of my first time delivering a
bulk mail to the main mail center, I stood there in amazement, in
a huge warehouse filled with big metal bins the size of cars. Watching
Australia Post employees "hand sort" parcels, ie, look at the label,
then throw 40 feet across the room into one of numerous bins. The
most successful technique involved bouncing the parcel off the back
wall of the bin like a basketball shot. A small percentage of the
parcels ended up on the floor, and there was a young gofer (maybe
an apprentice mail thrasher) who sometimes did the rounds picking up
the maverick parcels and putting them in the right bins.

Seemed very time efficient. Most of the times I went there they
were in all the office having coffee. I swear some of those parcels
had red stickers that looked just like the normal "fragile" stickers...
:o)
-Roman

PS. I now wrap my parcels so they can take being thrown 40 feet
at a hard metal wall!

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2000\10\03@160434 by M. Adam Davis

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It is my understanding that unless you mark your package properly, if it fits
into their machine it goes in it.

My post offices have "in-town" "out of town" and "parcels".  I'll assume the
wording is only different due to local variations in dialect.  I can see the
parcel bin being sorted, and anything that looks like a letter gets thrown back
in with the letters (perhaps with a mumbled, "Stupid customer, can't read...").

When shipping chips or PCBs, place a "Fragile!  Glass!" sticker on it
somewhere.  Given that the chips have silicon (the main component in glass) in
them, then you would be completely within your rights to do so.  They shouldn't
send it through a machine if it's very clearly labelled, with the proper
oversize postage attached.

-Adam

Dan Michaels wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2000\10\03@161720 by Peter L. Peres

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If you are really nervous about sending that chip you can get U or square
profile steel slightly larger than the chip width and height and cut a
piece 1 1/2" long of it. Wrap the chip in aluminium foil and insert in
hollow then mail in a small padded envelope. I suppose this is truckprof.
Hehe.

It has never occured to me that there may be delivery services that run a
truck over a package and then refuse to acknowledge this (except in this
country of course, where they drop the packages in the box behind a
scooter's saddle and drive onto/off the curb(s) 10-20 times with it inside
at the very least). Sometimes our packages contain shock sensitive
electro-optics and cameras. Aargh.

Peter

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2000\10\03@163151 by M. Adam Davis
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That's when it pays to purchase the externally visible shock sensors.  They have
dye in a plastic plate.  When the package is subject to over the rated shock in
G's it changes color.  Since it is external and you shipped it with insurance,
you just hand the package back to them w/o opening it and ask for your money.

-Adam

"Peter L. Peres" wrote:
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2000\10\04@044606 by Alan B. Pearce

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>When shipping chips or PCBs, place a "Fragile!  Glass!" sticker on it
>somewhere.  Given that the chips have silicon (the main component in glass) in

Was it not someone on this list who marked things "radioactive" so it got delivered by the FBI???

Perhaps that is what you should mark it. "FRAGILE - CONTAMINATION HAZARD IF BROKEN"

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2000\10\04@151130 by Peter L. Peres

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>g-shock warning device (dye tube)

I know those, they are used on relatively fragile equipment here (esp.
when it is rented). They are not an option for small packages (courier
delivery) although it is insured. If we'd have to wait for the post office
we'd go out of business. FYI a postcard makes 15 days from Toronto to here
(there are daily flights, and I count post office there to POB in their
premises here). By parcel it would be there/here tomorrow.

Peter

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