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'[PIC:] Serial IR Data Communication'
2004\02\23@205405 by Scott Pierce

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Hi All,

Does anyone know of any good reference material (website, book, etc) on how
to implement serial IR communication?  I'd like to be able to send bytes of
data from one robot to another using something along the lines of a 38Khz
receiver (Vishay TSOP1138 maybe) and an IR LED.  The target PIC would most
likely be a 16F628.  I've searched the net and haven't been able to find a
whole lot of information.  Rentron.com has a chip that will do this but I'd
like to implement it directly into my robot's brain and I plan on making as
many of these as I can so I can have them interact with each other.  Any
help you can provide me with is greatly appreciated.

Scott

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2004\02\23@215841 by kben

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Scott Pierce <spam_OUTpiclistTakeThisOuTspamSCOTTPIERCE.NET> said:

> Hi All,
>
> Does anyone know of any good reference material
(website, book, etc) on how
> to implement serial IR communication?  I'd like to be
able to send bytes of
> data from one robot to another using something along
the lines of a 38Khz
> receiver (Vishay TSOP1138 maybe) and an IR LED.  The
target PIC would most
> likely be a 16F628.  I've searched the net and haven't
been able to find a
> whole lot of information.  Rentron.com has a chip that
will do this but I'd
> like to implement it directly into my robot's brain and
I plan on making as
> many of these as I can so I can have them interact with
each other.  Any
> help you can provide me with is greatly appreciated.
>
> Scott
>

Hi Scott,
I was able to get Serial IR data to xmit at about
100 ft in sunlight using the Rentron Schematic here
www.rentron.com/Infrared_Communication.htm
Fig. 6 is xmit and Fig. 7 is the receive.
I set the pwm on the F628 to 38Khz and sent the data out
at 300 baud.
He gives an example of how to set the pwm here
http://www.rentron.com/PIC16F628.htm.
I am not sure what CHIP you need from Rentron ?
If you mean the Holtek, you don't need them.
Let me know if you have questions.

Good luck,
Kevin

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2004\02\23@222954 by Richard Graziano

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HP makes an IrDA transceiver set.  They also have applications notes.  Try
their website.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Scott Pierce" <.....piclistKILLspamspam@spam@SCOTTPIERCE.NET>
To: <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2004 8:43 PM
Subject: [PIC:] Serial IR Data Communication


> Hi All,
>
> Does anyone know of any good reference material (website, book, etc) on
how
> to implement serial IR communication?  I'd like to be able to send bytes
of
> data from one robot to another using something along the lines of a 38Khz
> receiver (Vishay TSOP1138 maybe) and an IR LED.  The target PIC would most
> likely be a 16F628.  I've searched the net and haven't been able to find a
> whole lot of information.  Rentron.com has a chip that will do this but
I'd
> like to implement it directly into my robot's brain and I plan on making
as
> many of these as I can so I can have them interact with each other.  Any
> help you can provide me with is greatly appreciated.
>
> Scott
>
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> http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
> ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.

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2004\02\23@225524 by Anand Dhuru

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Hi Scott,

I have had good results with setting the hardware PWM to 38 KHz, streaming
the serial data out of another pin, and simply connecting the IR LED between
these two (Anode to data out pin, cathode to PWM pin). It uses up an extra
pin on the PIC, but keeps the software the same as what you'd have if you
were transmitting thru' copper.

Regards,

Anand


{Original Message removed}

2004\02\23@234206 by tom_mcgahee

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Scott,

On the sending end you can use on/off control of a 38Khz square wave or
pulse stream. You can use a standard UART protocol for the data format.

The PIC can be used to produce the 38Khz frequency, or you can relegate that
job to a lowly 555 timer. The PIC would then control the output of the 555.
One way is to connect output of 555 to 10k resistor to base of Q1 npn
transistor. Q1 emitter to ground. Q1 collector to cathode of ir LED. LED
anode connected via limiting resistor to +5. Base of Q1 connected to
collector of npn Q2. Q2 emitter to ground. Base of Q2 via 10k resistor to
PIC output pin. HIGH on PIC output will result in NO ir pulses. LOW on PIC
output will allow ir pulses to be produced.

At receiving end a standard 38Khz ir module would connect to PIC input pin.
You may need inversion of signal by PIC to ensure that a HIGH out from
transmitting PIC results in a HIGH received. Inversion (if needed) can be at
either sending or receiving end.

*************** Alternate IR Driver

Alternately, you can have the PIC generating a 38Khz signal via an interrupt
routine. The internal square wave signal would be sent to the proper PIC pin
based on the state of a memory variable. If the state is HIGH, you would
pass the square wave on to a PIC output pin. If it was LOW, you would output
a LOW to the base of the IR driver transistor Q1. (in this case we don't
need Q2, since Q1 would be directly driven by the PIC output).

*********** FSK transmitter method

The above deals with a 38Khz data carrier that is sometimes on, sometimes
off. If you want, you can use Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) instead. Instead
of turning the 38Khz output on and off, this method uses two different
frequencies. One of the frequencies is within the capture range of the 38Khz
receiver module. The other is far enough away from 38Khz that it is not
locked onto by the receiver. In general, the time it takes to lock onto the
38Khz frequency is shorter for FSK.

The non-FSK method conserves power by having the LED off more than it is on.

In all of the above methods you must ensure that a BIT time is long enough
for the receiving IR module to produce a clearly distinguishable received
waveform. For example, at 38Khz it might take 8 cycles to achieve lock, so
error would be 8*100/38 = 21% (in this case a negative error). When
switching from the 38Khz signal to 0 or out-of-lock frequency, it might take
21% of a bit time before loss of lock occurs. If the error here is +21% then
the TOTAL error is more like about 2% in the real world, with the received
waveform being slightly delayed in time, but with only about 3% longterm
timing error.

If your data rate is too high, then lock error time begins to predominate.
For example, if your DATA rate was equal to about 25% of your carrier
frequency, then error soars to almost 100%

Fr. Tom McGahee



> {Original Message removed}

2004\02\24@023357 by Scott Pierce

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Thank you, everyone who responded.  This is a great starting place for
me!  Once I have a working code snippet/circuit I plan on putting it on the
net for others to reap the beniffits from.  Again, I appreciate your help.

Scott


At 08:39 PM 2/23/2004, you wrote:
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2004\02\24@024018 by Scott Pierce

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Thanks for the info.  It was the TX-IR chip I was looking at.  It's a
Serial IR Transceiver for $6 + IR LEDs and Receiver.  So, a complete link
costs about $12 if you buy all the parts from Rentron.  Granted, $12 isn't
that much but I would like to build at least four of five robots able to
send and receive IR data, so it would be nice to be able to do the
communications with a single chip if I can while controlling the rest of my
robot as well.  Anyway, I have a great starting point and I'll be sure to
post my end result on the net when I'm finished.  Thanks again!

Scott


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2004\02\24@024641 by Jinx

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> can relegate that job to a lowly 555 timer. The PIC would then
> control the output of the 555

For example

http://home.clear.net.nz/pages/joecolquitt/txless.html

As others have suggested, there are PIC-generated alternatives

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2004\02\24@025512 by Roland

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Hi scott

Sounds like direction, and data collision, are going to be a problem.
Have you looked at the packet radio sites? Not for the radio, but for the
protocols. There is tons of stuff there, and I do remember seeing pic stuff
implememted.

www.packetradio.com/Radio-TNC%20Wiring%20Diagrams.htm
http://www.tapr.org/tapr/html/pktf.html

Regards
Roland

At 05:43 PM 23/02/04 -0800, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Regards
Roland Jollivet


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2004\02\24@032454 by Wouter van Ooijen

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> Does anyone know of any good reference material (website,
> book, etc) on how
> to implement serial IR communication?  I'd like to be able to
> send bytes of
> data from one robot to another using something along the
> lines of a 38Khz
> receiver (Vishay TSOP1138 maybe) and an IR LED.

The receivers datasheet is your best friend, and the vishay site has a
lot of additional info. Just pay attention to the gaps required to keep
the receivers VCO happy, and consider the receivers on/off delay when
calculating the allowed baudrate mismatch (this particular aspect *is*
rate dependent!).

Wouter van Ooijen

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