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PICList Thread
'[PIC:] Emulators'
2001\01\17@170331 by Jose S. Samonte Jr.

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Good day to you!
I'm a real beginner in PIC programming, but I'm really trying my best to learn
and be good in PIC programming.
Please, would anyone be willing to teach me what an emulator is for?
Thank you very much.
Best regards.

____________________________________________________________________
Get free email and a permanent address at http://www.netaddress.com/?N=1

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2001\01\17@173958 by Gennette, Bruce

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Emulators are a piece of software (running on a PC) that pretends to be some
other device.

A PIC emulator is a program that pretends to be a PIC so that you can run a
PIC program on it to see if it will work on a real PIC.  With the bonuses of
seeing what happens to ports, RAM and internal settings (like the status
register) at each program step.

They are *ESSENTIAL* development tools.

Bye.

> {Original Message removed}

2001\01\17@180403 by Andrew Toone

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picon face
An emulator allows you to use your PC to run the program that would
normally run on the PIC. It should allow you to run the program at
something like normal speed, and also to run each instruction slowly
so that you can see how the program works. Emulators also allow you to
examine the chip's registers and outputs as the program runs, and some
emulators also simulate hardware (like LEDs etc.) plugged into the
chip.

This all saves you having to build a circuit, program the chip and
then not know why your program doesn't work.

If you have a nice new browser, you can try out the Emulator and
Assembler I've written that runs online. It's at:

       http://www.feersumtechnology.com/picem/

I hope this helps.

A.T.

"Jose S. Samonte Jr." wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2001\01\17@181635 by Mike Mansheim

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>A PIC emulator is a program that pretends to be a PIC so that you can run
a
>PIC program on it to see if it will work on a real PIC.  With the bonuses
of
>seeing what happens to ports, RAM and internal settings (like the status
>register) at each program step.

What I normally call an "emulator" is an "in-circuit emulator", which is a
piece of hardware that plugs into your circuit in place of the micro.  It
then becomes the micro, but is under the control of your pc (usually via
MPLAB).  It is intended to behave just like the real thing, with the
troubleshooting benefits of being able to stop execution (break points),
look at file registers, etc.
A program (i.e. done only in software) that does this is called a
"simulator" in MPLAB.
I like the simulator when working on code elements that only affect the
file registers (e.g. math routines).  However, for anything that affects
the ports and other peripherals, the emulator is the only way to go (if
you can afford it - they're not cheap).

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2001\01\17@182309 by Darrel Johansen

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Actually, at Microchip, an In Circuit Emulator is a hardware devices that
"emulates" the actual PICmicro that will be embedded in the application,
and which generally runs at full speed, and can deal with all the
peripherals that the actual microcontroller has.  It connects to the
target firmware and allows debugging, tracing of instruction flow, timing
of real-time events, and often has complex circuitry to respond to real
time events so that breakpoints can be set when particular events or
sequences of events occur in a real time application.

Simulators, on the other hand, are software programs that "simulate" the
actual operation of the PICmicro.  Simulators can be made to run very
fast, but usually, if they are asked to do complex things like keep track
of timers, respond to simulated I/O, and so forth, run much slower than
the actual silicon.  Simulators are mostly useful for checking out
software algorithms and for "sanity checking" your basic program flow.
Some people, as you can see from the responses so far, also refer to
simulators as "emulators," so when talking about hardware emulators,
you'll just see the term "ICE" for In-Circuit Emulator.

A trade-off between the two is In Circuit Debuggers which uses some
special capabilities built into the target micros to do debugging with the
real silicon.  These can run in real time, but do not have the
sophisticated capabilities of In Circuit Emulators.  These are simpler to
implement, and as a result, much cheaper than hardware emulators.  You'll
see these for some of the newer Microchip flash parts, such as the 16F876.

Darrel Johansen

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2001\01\17@183321 by Andrew Kunz

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That is a SIMULATOR.  An EMULATOR is real hardware that plugs into your circuit.

SIMULATORs are often very inexpensive or free (One comes free as part of MPLAB
and is very good).

EMULATORs usually cost big $$.

Andy











Andrew Toone <.....andyKILLspamspam@spam@FEERTECH.DEMON.CO.UK> on 01/18/2001 02:06:23 AM

Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>








To:      .....PICLISTKILLspamspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU

cc:      (bcc: Andrew Kunz/TDI_NOTES)



Subject: Re: [PIC:] Emulators








An emulator allows you to use your PC to run the program that would
normally run on the PIC. It should allow you to run the program at
something like normal speed, and also to run each instruction slowly
so that you can see how the program works. Emulators also allow you to
examine the chip's registers and outputs as the program runs, and some
emulators also simulate hardware (like LEDs etc.) plugged into the
chip.

This all saves you having to build a circuit, program the chip and
then not know why your program doesn't work.

If you have a nice new browser, you can try out the Emulator and
Assembler I've written that runs online. It's at:

       http://www.feersumtechnology.com/picem/

I hope this helps.

A.T.

"Jose S. Samonte Jr." wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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