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'[OT]IT Annoyances in this day and age!'
2011\02\08@021601 by cdb

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I find it remarkable and short sighted, that organisations and companies in this day and age code their webforms to not recognise email addresses from outside the main country they do business in.

I am unable to use a webform for ING bank in Australia as it doesn't except any addresses that aren't .com or .com.au .

The Australian federal governments jobsite also won't accept 'foreign' email addresses, neither do some Queensland government websites, but some do.

I have had this problem before with an insurance company and my local council. I must be the only person residing in this country who has, and uses a foreign email address, as when I draw it to peoples attention they either tell me no one else has mentioned it, or just pat me on the head to mollify me.

I consider it bad coding! - Mind you there are also some US and UK websites that are not able to cope with non US/UK post codes, which is just as bad.

Just as an aside the UK police incident non urgent reporting system can't cope with non UK telephone numbers. Which means if you don't have a UK land or mobile number don't bother reporting an incident as the system falls down when contact details are required.

I wonder how I know :)

Colin --
cdb,  on 8/02/2011

2011\02\08@024944 by Wouter van Ooijen

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> I am unable to use a webform for ING bank in Australia as it doesn't except
> any addresses that aren't .com or .com.au .

Nearly all USA bases companies allow you to select a foreign nation as shipping address, but then insist that you supply a 'state'.

Is there a good term for this type of short-sightness? Cultural egocentrism?

--
Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2011\02\08@040005 by cdb

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Of course I meant ACCEPT, not except!
--
cdb, spam_OUTcolinTakeThisOuTspambtech-online.co.uk on 8/02/2011
Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk   Hosted by:  http://www.justhost.com.au
 

2011\02\08@044548 by Michael Watterson

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On 08/02/2011 07:15, cdb wrote:
> I am unable to use a webform for ING bank in Australia as it doesn't except
> any addresses that aren't .com or .com.au .
what about .net, .org .info .biz
(all of which I have my own email and domains)

Seems silly.
..com isn't Australian eithe

2011\02\08@051736 by Philip Pemberton

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On 08/02/11 07:15, cdb wrote:
> I am unable to use a webform for ING bank in Australia as it doesn't except
> any addresses that aren't .com or .com.au .

I've had websites reject my .me.uk domain. "Top-level domain is not valid, please ensure you have typed it correctly."

By all means make sure the domain-part of my email address resolves properly, but don't reject it just because you're too lazy to update your TLD list. After all, .me.uk has only been around since what, 2002? I know I've had mine since 2004...

-- Phil.
.....piclistKILLspamspam@spam@philpem.me.uk
http://www.philpem.me.uk

2011\02\08@053954 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

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Em 8/2/2011 05:49, Wouter van Ooijen escreveu:
>> I am unable to use a webform for ING bank in Australia as it doesn't except
>> any addresses that aren't .com or .com.au .
> Nearly all USA bases companies allow you to select a foreign nation as
> shipping address, but then insist that you supply a 'state'.


Things are improving a lot. Presently most forms have an "N/A" option
for the state. Some even show the codes of the Brazilian States when
Brazil is selected.

__________________________________________________
Fale com seus amigos  de graça com o novo Yahoo! Messenger http://br.messenger.yahoo.com

2011\02\08@054735 by RussellMc

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> Things are improving a lot. Presently most forms have an "N/A" option
> for the state. Some even show the codes of the Brazilian States when
> Brazil is selected.


Most I see offer US states.
I choose Arkansas.



               Russell
               Auckland
               New Zealand

2011\02\08@081616 by Olin Lathrop

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cdb wrote:
> The Australian federal governments jobsite also won't accept 'foreign'
> email addresses, neither do some Queensland government websites, but
> some do.

Perhaps they want to avoid spam and other attacks, and keep to addresses
they might have some jurisdiction over.

> they either tell me no one else has mentioned it,

Probably true.  So don't do that.

> or just pat me on the head to mollify me.

But if they told you directly you're a moron wasting their time, you might
make a scene and waste even more of their time.  The politely dismissive
response makes sense when you think about it.

> I consider it bad coding!

Now, now, it's not all that bad. (virtual pat on the head)


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000

2011\02\08@122555 by Bob Blick

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On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 17:15 +1000, "cdb" wrote:
>  I find it remarkable and short sighted, that organisations and companies
> in this day and age code their webforms to not recognise email addresses
> from outside the main country they do business in.

Nothing worth forwarding from the help wanted ads today?

Thank you for telling me about this! I'll write my representative!

It brightens my day to hear one more person complaining about something
that is not only minor, but is also something that doesn't affect me.

Oh, lucky us, there are people adding their own pet peeves to this
thread! We are more important now!

I am looking forward to tomorrow's gem.

Bob

-- http://www.fastmail.fm - Accessible with your email software
                         or over the web

2011\02\08@132352 by Oli Glaser

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On 08/02/2011 17:25, Bob Blick wrote:
> On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 17:15 +1000, "cdb" wrote:
>>   I find it remarkable and short sighted, that organisations and companies
>> in this day and age code their webforms to not recognise email addresses
>> from outside the main country they do business in.
> Nothing worth forwarding from the help wanted ads today?
>
> Thank you for telling me about this! I'll write my representative!
>
> It brightens my day to hear one more person complaining about something
> that is not only minor, but is also something that doesn't affect me.
>
> Oh, lucky us, there are people adding their own pet peeves to this
> thread! We are more important now!
>
> I am looking forward to tomorrow's gem.
>
> Bob
>

If complaining about something minor is silly, then is complaining about complaining about something minor even sillier?
Sounds like it might do you good to indulge in the odd minor moan occasionally.. :-)

2011\02\08@132840 by Justin Richards

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If my sarcasm detector is functioning, then Bob has just added his pet
peeve to the thread,
>
> Oh, lucky us, there are people adding their own pet peeves to this
> thread! We are more important now!
>
> I am looking forward to tomorrow's gem.
>
> Bob

2011\02\08@134818 by Herbert Graf

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On Tue, 2011-02-08 at 10:17 +0000, Philip Pemberton wrote:
> On 08/02/11 07:15, cdb wrote:
> > I am unable to use a webform for ING bank in Australia as it doesn't except
> > any addresses that aren't .com or .com.au .
>
> I've had websites reject my .me.uk domain. "Top-level domain is not
> valid, please ensure you have typed it correctly."
>
> By all means make sure the domain-part of my email address resolves
> properly, but don't reject it just because you're too lazy to update
> your TLD list. After all, .me.uk has only been around since what, 2002?
> I know I've had mine since 2004...

I doubt there is a "TLD list". My guess is they are simply checking the
length of your TLD. The shortest you normally see a .com is 3
characters, so anything less they assume you either made an error or are
trying to hoodwink them.

For example, on many webforms that require personal information I put
"fake" information, an example is for phone number I put 416-555-1212.
MANY webforms these days detect the -555- and reject it.

TTYL

2011\02\08@143448 by cdb

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:: Nothing worth forwarding from the help wanted ads today?

No not today, but there is always tomorrow.

:: I am looking forward to tomorrow's gem.

Well I was going to 'sound' off about the modern approach to electronics apprentices (and possibly apprenticeships in general)and how their education might be falling short and they are being used, which has been irking me for some time, but I suppose now I'll have to submit the topic idea for editorial consideration in readiness for possible publication in Pet Peevers Monthly.

Colin


--
cdb, colinspamKILLspambtech-online.co.uk on 9/02/2011
Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk   Hosted by:  http://www.justhost.com.au
 

2011\02\08@144718 by Robert Csaba Molnar

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Well, if we consider that for a few years now unicode domain names are a reality, it becomes useless to check the domain name of the email address. It can be virtually anything.
For example <http://bücher.ch> is a valid domain. There are lots of new domains like .aero, <http://www.nic.aero>, etc....
More on the subject here
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internationalized_domain_name>

I think the problem comes down to the quality of coding. For email address checking a regular expression is used. Most coders just copy/paste some regexp code without checking if it actually works as expected. So don't be surprised.

I remember that some sites required "private email address" and rejected anything that was free (yahoo, hotmail, whatever). I didn't experience this sort of restriction
recently, but it is seemed pretty dumb at the time.



--- On Tue, 2/8/11, Herbert Graf <.....hkgrafKILLspamspam.....gmail.com> wrote:

From: Herbert Graf <EraseMEhkgrafspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com>
Subject: Re: [OT]IT Annoyances in this day and age!
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <piclistspamspam_OUTmit.edu>
Date: Tuesday, February 8, 2011, 8:49 PM

On Tue, 2011-02-08 at 10:17 +0000, Philip Pemberton wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I doubt there is a "TLD list". My guess is they are simply checking the
length of your TLD. The shortest you normally see a .com is 3
characters, so anything less they assume you either made an error or are
trying to hoodwink them.

For example, on many webforms that require personal information I put
"fake" information, an example is for phone number I put 416-555-1212.
MANY webforms these days detect the -555- and reject it.

TTYL

2011\02\08@162851 by IVP

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> Pet Peevers Monthly.

I'd sign Bob up for a subscription to Big Whoop Digest, but the
site won't accept my .co.nz addres

2011\02\08@172107 by Michael Watterson

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On 08/02/2011 21:26, IVP wrote:
>> Pet Peevers Monthly.
> I'd sign Bob up for a subscription to Big Whoop Digest, but the
> site won't accept my .co.nz address
use bob's address then :-

2011\02\09@120637 by Gerhard Fiedler

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Herbert Graf wrote:

> The shortest you normally see a .com is 3 characters,
This sort of thought is exactly the problem. "Normally"?
http://data.iana.org/TLD/tlds-alpha-by-domain.txt shows 247 two-letter
country domains (which includes US :) and only 21 "other" domains with
3+ letters. (I'm excluding the XN-- test domains here.)

Gerhar

2011\02\09@121315 by Gerhard Fiedler

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Olin Lathrop wrote:

> cdb wrote:
>> The Australian federal governments jobsite also won't accept
>> 'foreign' email addresses, neither do some Queensland government
>> websites, but some do.
>
> Perhaps they want to avoid spam and other attacks, and keep to
> addresses they might have some jurisdiction over.

Interesting thought. What's the jurisdiction of internet domains?
In this specific case, I have a hard time imagining that Australia has
any more jurisdiction over .com domains (accepted) than it has over,
say, .co.uk domains (rejected).

Probably the result of simple, plain shortsightedness.

Gerhar

2011\02\09@121433 by M.L.

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On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 1:23 PM, Oli Glaser <@spam@oli.glaserKILLspamspamtalktalk.net> wrote:

>
> If complaining about something minor is silly, then is complaining about
> complaining about something minor even sillier?
> Sounds like it might do you good to indulge in the odd minor moan
> occasionally.. :-)
>

I believe the correct term would be meta-complaint.

-- Martin K

2011\02\09@145107 by Herbert Graf

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On Wed, 2011-02-09 at 15:06 -0200, Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
> Herbert Graf wrote:
>
> > The shortest you normally see a .com is 3 characters,
>
> This sort of thought is exactly the problem. "Normally"?
>
> http://data.iana.org/TLD/tlds-alpha-by-domain.txt shows 247 two-letter
> country domains (which includes US :) and only 21 "other" domains with
> 3+ letters. (I'm excluding the XN-- test domains here.)

That's not what I'm talking about.

It's common for the country domain is only 2 characters, many sites I
visit are .ca.

The problem is there are very few COMMON domains with 2 character +
whatever, i.e. ab.com isn't something people are used to seeing, abc.com
is.

As a result, some coders assume that if you domain is only 2 characters
then you're up to something.

I'm not saying I think it's a good idear, I don't (for example .co.uk is
VERY common) but I do understand how some web coders think that way.

TTYL

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