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'[OT]Brilliant unintended pun'
2009\07\01@011424 by cdb

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Job agency in NZ is advertising for a Technical Adviser.

.Globally recognised dairy manufacturer.
.Great team culture.

This is almost certainly Fontana who seem to own the dairy market in
NZ. I wonder if they only select the cream of the crop and it's hard
cheese to all those who fail the interview?

Colin
--
cdb,  on 1/07/2009



2009\07\01@011705 by cdb

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This is almost certainly Fontana - oops meant Fonterra

Colin
--
cdb,  on 1/07/2009



2009\07\01@013201 by Xiaofan Chen

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On Wed, Jul 1, 2009 at 1:14 PM, cdb<spam_OUTcolinTakeThisOuTspambtech-online.co.uk> wrote:
>  Job agency in NZ is advertising for a Technical Adviser.
>
>  .Globally recognised dairy manufacturer.
>  .Great team culture.
>
> This is almost certainly Fonterra who seem to own the dairy market in
> NZ. I wonder if they only select the cream of the crop and it's hard
> cheese to all those who fail the interview?
>

I understand the meaning of "the cream of the crop" but I failed
to understand what do you mean by "hard cheese". So I asked
a few colleagues here and none of them understood it even though
one of them is really good at English. So I fired up WordWeb and
found it seems to be only used by Brits and mean "bad luck".

Interesting pun.


--
Xiaofan http://mcuee.blogspot.com

2009\07\01@025336 by cdb

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:: but I failed to understand what do you mean by "hard cheese".

:: seems to be only used by Brits

I didn't know that, I thought it was in other English variants. Now I
have a quest to find out other British English only phrases.

Colin
--
cdb, .....colinKILLspamspam@spam@btech-online.co.uk on 1/07/2009

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2009\07\01@041658 by Alan B. Pearce

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>:: but I failed to understand what do you mean by "hard cheese".
>
>:: seems to be only used by Brits
>
>I didn't know that, I thought it was in other English variants.
>Now I have a quest to find out other British English only phrases.

I would class it as being well known in English speaking countries,
specifically those that are part of the British Commonwealth, rather than
US-centric countries.

The term is a bit more than just 'bad luck', it is self induced bad luck,
i.e. you have done something that induced the bad luck situation, although
the way Colin used it, it would be just 'tough luck' rather than 'bad luck'.

I suspect it dates back to the workers going out to harvest, with their
lunch wrapped up. Lunch would typically be bread, cheese and cider. If you
didn't wrap the cheese properly it would go hard, and is then almost
inedible.

2009\07\01@052731 by Xiaofan Chen

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On Wed, Jul 1, 2009 at 4:16 PM, Alan B. Pearce<Alan.B.PearcespamKILLspamstfc.ac.uk> wrote:
>>:: but I failed to understand what do you mean by "hard cheese".
>>
>>:: seems to be only used by Brits
>>
>>I didn't know that, I thought it was in other English variants.
>>Now I have a quest to find out other British English only phrases.
>
> I would class it as being well known in English speaking countries,
> specifically those that are part of the British Commonwealth, rather than
> US-centric countries.

Singapore used to be a British colony and is part of British Commonwealth.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_members_of_the_Commonwealth_of_Nations_by_name

Even Canada is part British Commonwealth. So I am not so sure what
English Speaking Countries qualify as US-centric other than USA.

> The term is a bit more than just 'bad luck', it is self induced bad luck,
> i.e. you have done something that induced the bad luck situation, although
> the way Colin used it, it would be just 'tough luck' rather than 'bad luck'.
>
> I suspect it dates back to the workers going out to harvest, with their
> lunch wrapped up. Lunch would typically be bread, cheese and cider. If you
> didn't wrap the cheese properly it would go hard, and is then almost
> inedible.

Thanks for the explanation.


--
Xiaofan http://mcuee.blogspot.com

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