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'[OT] vector drawing tool?'
2010\02\08@101825 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
What would you recommend as vector drawing tool for things like block
diagrams, signal sequences, simple mechanical pictures, state transition
diagrams, etc? These are meant to be imported in a word document, which
eventually might become a book. Must be scalable, so no pixel drawing.

I now lean towards, of all things, the eagle circuit editor, because I
know how it works an I have a good .eps export tool for it.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2010\02\08@103643 by Christopher Cole

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On Mon, Feb 08, 2010 at 04:18:11PM +0100, Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> What would you recommend as vector drawing tool for things like block
> diagrams, signal sequences, simple mechanical pictures, state transition
> diagrams, etc?

Wouter,

Graphviz works nicely.  It is based on the dot language, so you can
describe state and flow diagrams with text, and then use dot to generate
the svg files.

You may also want to check out inkscape.

Take care,
-Chris

--
| Christopher Cole, Cole Design and Development, LLC          spam_OUTcoleTakeThisOuTspamcoledd.com |
| Embedded Software Development and Electronic Design       http://coledd.com |
| Stow, Ohio, USA                                                800-518-2154 |

2010\02\08@110322 by Carl Denk

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I use Intellicad, it's an Autocad clone. Maybe more power than you need.
Can export as PDF. I use SNAGIT to screen grab to BMP, JPG, and many
other raster formats, and then import. If not familiar with Autocad,
there will be a learning curve, but then if you are ever have to use
Autocad, that will be a no brainer. Here are some links:
$51 personal edition probably adequate for what you need. I use the
professional which has 3D, import raster graphics and draw on top. I use
this a lot, where I scan a DIP pinout drawing with labels, and draw the
circuit with lines to the pins. There are considerable symbol libraries
available, everything from electric motors, transistors, to piping
symbols, or make your own and save them. Then easily scaled, rotated, moved.
http://intellicadms.com/site/

and here's a free Intellicad, donations appreciated:
www.bestfreewaredownload.com/freeware/t-free-progecad-smart-intellicad-autocad-clone-freeware-qtwbnnss.html
I tried it, and it didn't seem to have as nice a feel to it, might have
needed installation tweaking, but should work good for the simple stuff.
I think it does 3D and the raster import, but hadn't tried it.


Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> What would you recommend as vector drawing tool for things like block
> diagrams, signal sequences, simple mechanical pictures, state transition
> diagrams, etc? These are meant to be imported in a word document, which
> eventually might become a book. Must be scalable, so no pixel drawing.
>
> I now lean towards, of all things, the eagle circuit editor, because I
> know how it works an I have a good .eps export tool for it.
>
>  

2010\02\08@111157 by Per Linne

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I use Serif Draw Plus.
http://www.serif.com/

PerL

----- Original Message -----
From: "Wouter van Ooijen" <.....wouterKILLspamspam@spam@voti.nl>
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <piclistspamKILLspammit.edu>
Sent: Monday, February 08, 2010 4:18 PM
Subject: [OT] vector drawing tool?


{Quote hidden}

> --

2010\02\08@113650 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Feb 8, 2010, at 7:18 AM, Wouter van Ooijen wrote:

> What would you recommend as vector drawing tool
>
> I now lean towards, of all things, the eagle circuit editor

I have also been using EAGLE as a general purpose drawing tool for
similar things.

BillW

2010\02\08@115120 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> I have also been using EAGLE as a general purpose drawing tool for
> similar things.

experiences?

especially: which walls did you hit?

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2010\02\08@124546 by Carl Denk

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face
Since I have been with Autocad for many years, the transition to
Intellicad was not an issue, it's a clone, just find the icons. For a
newcomer, drawing lines, rectangles, circles, etc very straight forward.
Snaps (to a grid you specify the mesh), Object snaps (line end,
intersection, center of circle, etc.), drawing orthogonal, start to add  
a little complexity, but make drawing a whole lot easier. It has a
zillion features, which you could go to a months of classes and touch
the surface, but with a days time should be fairly proficient at basics.
An hour with an experienced user would make a great improvement. And
there are tutorials to get started. Should be able to find online or
downloaded tutorials. And that would include Autocad stuff too since
they are so close. To show flexibility, current thing I have been doing
with Intellicad is making CD jewel case labels. Print outs can be to an
accurate scale, in this case the cut and bend lines are to full size.
All Windows fonts are available and scalable. Once you are  familiar,
you will find many other uses.

Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
>> I have also been using EAGLE as a general purpose drawing tool for
>> similar things.
>>    
>
> experiences?
>
> especially: which walls did you hit?
>
>  

2010\02\08@134717 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
Also OpenOffice's Draw quite good (and free).

Tamas


On Mon, Feb 8, 2010 at 5:45 PM, Carl Denk <.....cdenkKILLspamspam.....windstream.net> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2010\02\08@140057 by Paul Hutchinson

picon face
> -----Original Message-----
> From: EraseMEpiclist-bouncesspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu On Behalf Of Wouter van Ooijen
> Sent: Monday, February 08, 2010 10:18 AM
>
> What would you recommend as vector drawing tool for things like block
> diagrams, signal sequences, simple mechanical pictures, state transition
> diagrams, etc? These are meant to be imported in a word document, which
> eventually might become a book. Must be scalable, so no pixel drawing.
>
> I now lean towards, of all things, the eagle circuit editor, because I
> know how it works an I have a good .eps export tool for it.
>

I like OpenOffice Draw for simple drawings and illustrations like you
described. It has all the flowcharting and block diagramming symbols I've
needed and the 3D basic shapes have been very handy for simple 3D mechanical
diagrams.

If I need dimensional accuracy I use a mechanical CAD program and for more
complex illustrations I use Inkscape.

Paul Hutch

>
> Wouter van Ooijen
>
> -- -------------------------------------------
> Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
> consultancy, development, PICmicro products
> docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2010\02\09@035504 by Marechiare

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Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> What would you recommend as vector drawing tool for things like block
> diagrams, signal sequences, simple mechanical pictures, state transition
> diagrams, etc? These are meant to be imported in a word document, which
> eventually might become a book. Must be scalable, so no pixel drawing.
>
> I now lean towards, of all things, the eagle circuit editor, because I
> know how it works an I have a good .eps export tool for it.

Try Microsoft Office:
http://us20.trymicrosoftoffice.com/default.aspx?culture=en-US

Microsoft Visio:
office.microsoft.com/en-us/visio/default.aspx

2010\02\09@045302 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Tue, Feb 9, 2010 at 4:55 PM, Marechiare <marechiarespamspam_OUTgmail.com> wrote:
> Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
>> What would you recommend as vector drawing tool for things like block
>> diagrams, signal sequences, simple mechanical pictures, state transition
>> diagrams, etc? These are meant to be imported in a word document, which
>> eventually might become a book. Must be scalable, so no pixel drawing.
>>
> Microsoft Visio:
> http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/visio/default.aspx

Visio is very good, I used it since the Visio Technical time
around year 1998. Now I am using Visio 2003. I think it is
one of the standard tools for many companies.


--
Xiaofan http://mcuee.blogspot.com

2010\02\09@054917 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

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Em 9/2/2010 07:53, Xiaofan Chen escreveu:
> On Tue, Feb 9, 2010 at 4:55 PM, Marechiare <@spam@marechiareKILLspamspamgmail.com> wrote:
>  
>> Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
>>    
>>> What would you recommend as vector drawing tool for things like block
>>> diagrams, signal sequences, simple mechanical pictures, state transition
>>> diagrams, etc? These are meant to be imported in a word document, which
>>> eventually might become a book. Must be scalable, so no pixel drawing.
>>>
>>>      
>> Microsoft Visio:
>> office.microsoft.com/en-us/visio/default.aspx
>>    
> Visio is very good, I used it since the Visio Technical time
> around year 1998. Now I am using Visio 2003. I think it is
> one of the standard tools for many companies.
>  

According to Dia's page at PortableApps.com, Dia is
based/inspired/knock-off of Visio, and is free and open source.

Regards,

Isaac

__________________________________________________
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2010\02\09@072044 by Jon Chandler

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On Tue, Feb 9, 2010 at 1:53 AM, Xiaofan Chen <KILLspamxiaofancKILLspamspamgmail.com> wrote:

> On Tue, Feb 9, 2010 at 4:55 PM, Marechiare <RemoveMEmarechiareTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
> > Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> >> What would you recommend as vector drawing tool for things like block
> >> diagrams, signal sequences, simple mechanical pictures, state transition
> >> diagrams, etc? These are meant to be imported in a word document, which
> >> eventually might become a book. Must be scalable, so no pixel drawing.
> >>
> > Microsoft Visio:
> > http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/visio/default.aspx
>
> Visio is very good, I used it since the Visio Technical time
> around year 1998. Now I am using Visio 2003. I think it is
> one of the standard tools for many companies.
>
>
> --
> Xiaofan http://mcuee.blogspot.com
> -
>

Visio is my "go to" tool for getting graphics on paper.  The learning curve
is pretty gentle making it simple to get started.

Jon

2010\02\09@074305 by mcd

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Isaac Marino Bavaresco wrote:

> According to Dia's page at PortableApps.com, Dia is
> based/inspired/knock-off of Visio, and is free and
> open source.

Dia has become my drawing tool, works well and the price is right.

On the other hand, if you are already totally immersed in the evil empire,
Powerpoint does a pretty acceptable job for a lot of simple diagrams, and
chances are you already have it.

--McD


2010\02\09@093947 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
Thanks for all the answers, I will give some a quick try. For some I
don't think they can create scalable images, but maybe I am wrong.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2010\02\09@134432 by YES NOPE9

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face
Please report back.
gus


{Quote hidden}

2010\02\12@091735 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
>> Thanks for all the answers, I will give some a quick try. For some I
>> don't think they can create scalable images, but maybe I am wrong.

> Please report back.

OK, here is some 'report back'.

Graphviz :
seems to be a script-to-graphs translator, but the graphs look to
restricted for what I need. I can't imagine how for instance to draw a
picture clarifying a switch bounce.

Intellicad:
following the free download link did not lead to a download page.
intellicad itself is a bit expensive for what I want at $240.

serif draw plus:
seems like it might do the job (.eps files are specifically mentioned).
But at GBP 80 it will first have to wait for the free alternatives to fail.

open office draw:
seems like it can do all the drawing, but eps is not a native format, so
 I end up having one open office file and one eps file (for each
drawing), and I must export to eps each time I change the drawing. And I
 don't see how I can have one master file for a bunch of eps drawings
(like I can do in eagle with a bit of ULP).

microsoft office:
I have done a lot of drawing in word, but I found it a PITA. Also I see
now way to save as vector format (but if it were easy and reliable to
store inside a word document I would not have needed that).

microsoft viso:
looks nice, but too expensive.

portable apps dia:
wow, unlike open office draw I could actually make a simple drawing in
60 seconds! otherwise the same nitpicking as OOD: editing and exporting
to .eps are separate steps. maybe the python interface can cure this
problem, but it insisted on python 2.3, which is a bit outdated. I
already have 2.5 and 3.0 in my PC, I am not sure I want yet another one.

Conclusion: For simple drawings I'll stick to eagle, mainly because I
like to have one master source document, from which I can export a bunch
of .eps files with one command. For more complex drawings I'll try dia.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu





2010\02\12@101745 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 09:17 AM 12/02/2010, you wrote:
> >> Thanks for all the answers, I will give some a quick try. For some I
> >> don't think they can create scalable images, but maybe I am wrong.
>
> > Please report back.
A couple of other suggestions...

I really like Adobe Illustrator, but it's a steep learning curve and
not cheap. Searching for "open source alternative" will come up with
several suggestions such as inkscape and some for Linux (haven't
tried so I won't  comment).

Mayura Draw (Win) is not quite free, but it's very cheap and it looks
a lot like native Postscript to me in its paradigm. I tried it a few
years ago and it is quite snappy performance wise, not sure if it
has all the features you'd need.

Also, maybe consider Google's Sketchup (Win).




{Quote hidden}

>

2010\02\12@110624 by mcd

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Wouter wrote:

> wow, unlike open office draw I could actually make a simple drawing in
> 60 seconds! otherwise the same nitpicking as OOD: editing and exporting
> to .eps are separate steps.

I have found that when I want to make drawings for publication, I almost
invariably need to hand-edit the EPS.  That has led me to prefer tools
liks Dia or gEDA's schematic editor which produce simple EPS files.

I didn't see Inkscape in your list.  It's native format is scalable (svg),
although not everyone can handle svg output.  The downside is that it is
one of those higher end tools so the learning curve is kinda steep.
Still, the price is right.

--McD


2010\02\12@111853 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> I didn't see Inkscape in your list.  It's native format is scalable (svg),
> although not everyone can handle svg output.  The downside is that it is
> one of those higher end tools so the learning curve is kinda steep.
> Still, the price is right.

My main document is in word (.doc), so I restrict myself to tools that
can output something that word can import directly. Preferrably the
tool's native format is directly importable in word. Or there is a
one-button export.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2010\02\12@114825 by mcd

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Wouter wrote:

> My main document is in word (.doc), so I restrict myself to tools that
> can output something that word can import directly. Preferrably the
> tool's native format is directly importable in word. Or there is a
> one-button export.

Although Inkscape's native format is svg (which is rapidly beccoming more
popular), it can "Save As" eps, wmf, hpgl and xaml, all of which Word will
eat, as well as dozens of other formats.

However, I suppose "Save As" is too many clicks
 File
   Save As
     Select Format

       OK

Not one button, but not bad.

--McD


2010\02\12@130236 by Vitaliy

face
flavicon
face
Not exactly on-topic, but hopefully this will save people some trouble.

I purchased some EPS artwork recently and found that Word could not import
the EPS correctly (elements broken, colors are off, etc). The solution was
to to open the EPS in Illustrator, and re-export it in "Illustrator 3 EPS"
format.

I'm still not very comfortable with Illustrator (IMO its UI is even less
intuitive than Eagle 4's), my preferred tool for vectors is CorelDraw 9.
This apparently goes both ways, as the designer I work with loves AI and
hates Corel.

--
Wouter, FWIW in my experience having two (or more) formats for a drawing is
very common, and I don't consider it to be a significant problem.

- Web designers usually create the artwork in PhotoShop, then export it for
web as jpg, png, or gif.
- Vector drawings are usually done in Illustrator, then exported to EPS or
PDF.
- SolidWorks and ProE files are often exported into a common 3D interchange
format (the name escapes me).
- Manuals and datasheets are done in FrameMaker of InDesign, but we usually
see them only as PDFs.

Even with EAGLE, we inevitably export our PCBs as gerbers.

To me, the #1 factor when deciding which tool to use, is how quickly I can
get the end result. Exporting takes maybe 1 or 2% of the total time (maybe
less, depending on how complex the drawing is). So I use CorelDraw for
technical drawings and vector designs, switch to Visio for flowcharts, and
use Illustrator to edit PDFs.

Vitaliy

2010\02\12@173700 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> Even with EAGLE, we inevitably export our PCBs as gerbers.

I don't, if I can get away with using .brd files directly! My favourite
board houses do (maybe that is no coincidence). I would not minde using
gerbers so much if I had one eagle button that produced the .zip with
all files in it. But that is still one more file than simply using the .brd

> To me, the #1 factor when deciding which tool to use, is how quickly I can
> get the end result. Exporting takes maybe 1 or 2% of the total time (maybe
> less, depending on how complex the drawing is). So I use CorelDraw for
> technical drawings and vector designs, switch to Visio for flowcharts, and
> use Illustrator to edit PDFs.

Maybe I am a-typical. I tend to make a lot of small changes, so the
effort of exporting (in the correct format, to the correct file, maybe
in another directory) can be significant, and it offers me too much
opportunities for errors.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2010\02\12@194312 by Marechiare

picon face
Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> microsoft office:
> I have done a lot of drawing in word, but I found it a
> PITA. Also I see now way to save as vector format
> (but if it were easy and reliable to store inside a word
> document I would not have needed that).

Better, perhaps, would be Excel to store the graphics. Create as many
Excel sheets as needed. You could then just copy-paste the graphics
into the Word doc.

If I am not mistaken, Office can import graphics in many vector
formats. On the importing you could just convert the graphics into
Office internal format to be able edit it. Its vector graphics editing
capabilities are not that bad as for me.

2010\02\12@220618 by cdb

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The new I-DEX has drawing capabilities.

At the moment it is in beta but only for the schematic and pcb side of
things. Drawing works fine.

http://www.kov.com

Colin
--
cdb, spamBeGonecolinspamBeGonespambtech-online.co.uk on 2/13/2010

Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk  

Hosted by:  http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=7988359







2010\02\14@163956 by Vitaliy

face
flavicon
face
Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
>> Even with EAGLE, we inevitably export our PCBs as gerbers.
>
> I don't, if I can get away with using .brd files directly! My favourite
> board houses do (maybe that is no coincidence).

None of the board houses we work with accept EAGLE files, so we must export
them to Gerbers for production. I don't think we would send native EAGLE
files even if our CM accepted them. Ultimately, they would have to convert
them to gerbers for their machines, and we would have far less control over
what happens. I like being able to pull the gerbers into a viewer and check
them for errors.


> I would not minde using
> gerbers so much if I had one eagle button that produced the .zip with
> all files in it.

That *would* be sweet.


{Quote hidden}

I tend to make a lot of small changes too, but you typically make them in
the native format, and export them to JPEG, WMF, EPS etc when you're done.

Do you work on a computer with multiple monitors?

Vitaliy

2010\02\14@165846 by Carl Denk

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I wasn't following so close at beginning, but thought this was for
manuals and illustrations. A little history: One of the first high
resolution graphics card for the IBM "AT", the QDP VIVA card was drawn
with Autocad V2.17. Don't know what the mechanism was back then to get
that file to an etched board, but can guess it was some sort of photo
resist process. A friend designed it, and at work I had one of the Beta's.

Vitaliy wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2010\02\14@165913 by dpharris

picon face
Quoting Vitaliy <TakeThisOuTpiclistEraseMEspamspam_OUTmaksimov.org>:

> Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
....
> > I would not minde using
> > gerbers so much if I had one eagle button that produced the .zip with
> > all files in it.
>
> That *would* be sweet.

I would surmise that one could right a script in Eagle to do that.  

David


2010\02\14@223527 by Vitaliy

face
flavicon
face
dpharris@telus.net wrote:
>> > I would not minde using
>> > gerbers so much if I had one eagle button that produced the .zip with
>> > all files in it.
>>
>> That *would* be sweet.
>
> I would surmise that one could right a script in Eagle to do that.

It wouldn't meet the "one eagle button" requirement. :)

We adopted Olin's BOM script for EAGLE 5 at work (with modifications), but
frankly the time savings for exporting/zipping the gerbers seem so small as
to not be worth the effort.

Vitaliy

2010\02\15@012238 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> Do you work on a computer with multiple monitors?

multiple computers yes, and they of course have different monitors. but
one per computer.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2010\02\15@065058 by wzab

flavicon
picon face
Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
| What would you recommend as vector drawing tool for things like block
| diagrams, signal sequences, simple mechanical pictures, state transition
| diagrams, etc? These are meant to be imported in a word document, which
| eventually might become a book. Must be scalable, so no pixel drawing.

For diagrams I have used XFig for a long time, then I tried Inkscape,
which had too many features for me, and finally I have decided to use
Ipe (http://tclab.kaist.ac.kr/ipe/ ), which allows me to easily integrate
LaTeX formulas with my drawings.

For signal sequences I often use the "drawtiming"
(http://drawtiming.sourceforge.net/ )

All mentioned tools are free and open source and generate EPS and/or PDF
output.
--
HTH, Wojtek

2010\02\17@010554 by Vitaliy

face
flavicon
face
Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
>> Do you work on a computer with multiple monitors?
>
> multiple computers yes, and they of course have different monitors. but
> one per computer.

Wouter, drop everything and go buy yourself a second monitor. Your life will
never be the same.

Vitaliy

2010\02\17@011819 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
On Sun, Feb 14, 2010 at 9:59 PM,  <RemoveMEdpharrisspamTakeThisOuTtelus.net> wrote:
> I would surmise that one could right a script in Eagle to do that.

You only need AutoIt script which then can be compiled into an EXE
program -- that could automate the whole exporting process minimising
human errors. And no need to learn too much, just record whatever you
are doing, and maybe tweak the generated script just a bit.

Tamas


>
> David
>
>
> -

2010\02\17@012724 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
On Wed, Feb 17, 2010 at 6:05 AM, Vitaliy <piclistEraseMEspam.....maksimov.org> wrote:
> Wouter, drop everything and go buy yourself a second monitor. Your life will
> never be the same.

I agree with you Vitaliy. I started to use second monitor when I
swapped from desktop to laptop, and now I just can't live without it.
It is good for applications uses independent windows, so that you can
put schematics on one screen and pcb design to the other for example.
Or different layers. It is also good when developing the firmware -
datasheet on one screen, editor is on the other. It is even good for
video editing - you can display the output at full screen on one
screen and in the meanwhile have the editor in the other.

Tamas


>
> Vitaliy
>
> -

2010\02\17@013100 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
Vitaliy wrote:
> Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
>>> Do you work on a computer with multiple monitors?
>> multiple computers yes, and they of course have different monitors. but
>> one per computer.
>
> Wouter, drop everything and go buy yourself a second monitor. Your life will
> never be the same.

Trouble one is that half the time I am at the school behind some random
computer (running a random OS). I can't buy a second monitor for all of
them, much less keep them at their place (students seem to displike
things that are not bolted to the table).

Trouble two is that at home I am almost out of space.

I had a doubles-creen configuration once at work, but I always lost my
mouse cursor. But maybe I should try it again sometime.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2010\02\17@013655 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Wed, Feb 17, 2010 at 2:27 PM, Tamas Rudnai <EraseMEtamas.rudnaispamgmail.com> wrote:
> On Wed, Feb 17, 2010 at 6:05 AM, Vitaliy <RemoveMEpiclistEraseMEspamEraseMEmaksimov.org> wrote:
>> Wouter, drop everything and go buy yourself a second monitor. Your life will
>> never be the same.
>
> I agree with you Vitaliy. I started to use second monitor when I
> swapped from desktop to laptop, and now I just can't live without it.
> It is good for applications uses independent windows, so that you can
> put schematics on one screen and pcb design to the other for example.
> Or different layers.

Yeah this is what I do at work, quite a bit recently since I needed to
check 8 layout designs over the past two months. Without the 2nd
monitor, it is a bit difficult. Schematics on one screen and PCB on the
other screen.

> It is also good when developing the firmware -
> datasheet on one screen, editor is on the other. It is even good for
> video editing - you can display the output at full screen on one
> screen and in the meanwhile have the editor in the other.



--
Xiaofan http://mcuee.blogspot.com

2010\02\17@163904 by YES NOPE9

flavicon
face
>
>
> I had a doubles-creen configuration once at work, but I always lost my
> mouse cursor. But maybe I should try it again sometime.
>
> --
>
> Wouter van Ooijen

"find a mouse cursor" applications are available.  I find them useful.
Gus

2010\02\17@165357 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> "find a mouse cursor" applications are available.  I find them useful.

But how do you double-click them when ....

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2010\02\17@165546 by YES NOPE9

flavicon
face
>
> On Feb 16, 2010, at 11:05 PM, Vitaliy wrote:
>
> Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
>>> Do you work on a computer with multiple monitors?
>>
>> multiple computers yes, and they of course have different monitors.  
>> but
>> one per computer.
>
> Wouter, drop everything and go buy yourself a second monitor. Your  
> life will
> never be the same.
>
> Vitaliy

Yes, two or three BIG monitors.
You can even add monitors using USB.
Gus

2010\02\17@182114 by Vitaliy

face
flavicon
face
Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> I had a doubles-creen configuration once at work, but I always lost my
> mouse cursor.

LOL, this is classic!..

:-DDD

2010\02\17@182714 by Vitaliy

face
flavicon
face
Tamas Rudnai wrote:
>> Wouter, drop everything and go buy yourself a second monitor. Your life
>> will
>> never be the same.
>
> I agree with you Vitaliy. I started to use second monitor when I
> swapped from desktop to laptop, and now I just can't live without it.
> It is good for applications uses independent windows, so that you can
> put schematics on one screen and pcb design to the other for example.
> Or different layers. It is also good when developing the firmware -
> datasheet on one screen, editor is on the other. It is even good for
> video editing - you can display the output at full screen on one
> screen and in the meanwhile have the editor in the other.

I have my mail client on my left monitor as I write this, and the app I'm
working in on the right.

The left monitor is in portrait mode, perfect for viewing datasheets.

Vitaliy

2010\02\18@082452 by M.L.

flavicon
face
On Sun, Feb 14, 2010 at 5:39 PM, Vitaliy <RemoveMEpiclistspam_OUTspamKILLspammaksimov.org> wrote:

>
>
> > I would not minde using
> > gerbers so much if I had one eagle button that produced the .zip with
> > all files in it.
>
> That *would* be sweet.
>
>
>

Running two CAM jobs (excellon and gerbers) and zipping up the files takes a
whole minute.
I guess it would be "sweet" though.

--
Martin K.

2010\02\18@084622 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> Running two CAM jobs (excellon and gerbers) and zipping up the files takes a
> whole minute.

Which is enough to irritate me.

But more important: I can make mistakes.
- select the wrong CAM job (single/double sided, 1/2 silk screens, etc)
- forgetting drillcfg.ulp
- opening the wrong .brd file (can't run CAM jobs from the layout editor)
- selecting the wrong files into the zip file
- putting the zip file in the wrong place (or giving it the wrong name),
so I can later:
- fetch the wrong zip file for sending to the PCB house

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

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