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'[OT] sharing net connection'
2000\05\07@221034 by Alan Aldaba

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Hi all,

   I want to network 5 computers and share internet connection among
them... what advises can you give me to avoid problems in getting it to
work. I want to do it in the cheapest but reliable and stable
configuration possible.. What brands (nic, hubs) do you recommend  ( the

most cost effective) ? Any url's, links to tutorials about the subject
will be most welcome...

All the Best,

       Allan

2000\05\07@221909 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 10:13 AM 5/8/00 +0800, you wrote:
>Hi all,
>
>    I want to network 5 computers and share internet connection among
>them... what advises can you give me to avoid problems in getting it to
>work. I want to do it in the cheapest but reliable and stable
>configuration possible.. What brands (nic, hubs) do you recommend  ( the

I use a Linux box as a masquerading firewall between a broadband net
connection and my internal LAN with a handful of computers on it. The
firewall machine thus has two NIC's in it. The LAN runs TCP/IP over
Ethernet connections (thinnet, so no hubs). The technology isn't all
that important if it meets your speed requirements and is supported..
Linux support for 10/100 is not 100% at this time.

Advantages:     pretty much bulletproof security, very stable O/S
                       especially if you only run basic services

                       built in web server, FTP server etc.

Disadvantages:  another machine (may be considered an advantage!)

                       can't run "risky" software like netmeeting and ICQ
                       on the LAN

                       non-trivial to set up


I first had it set up using Sygate software (US$40) on a Win98 computer, using
zonealarm for a bit more security but was having some problems with
this and worried about the security. This didn't require an extra box.


>most cost effective) ? Any url's, links to tutorials about the subject
>will be most welcome...
>
>All the Best,
>
>        Allan
>
>
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
spam_OUTspeffTakeThisOuTspaminterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com
Contributions invited->The AVR-gcc FAQ is at: http://www.bluecollarlinux.com
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

2000\05\07@230030 by Damon Hopkins

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Alan Aldaba wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
>     I want to network 5 computers and share internet connection among
> them... what advises can you give me to avoid problems in getting it to
> work. I want to do it in the cheapest but reliable and stable
> configuration possible.. What brands (nic, hubs) do you recommend  ( the
>
> most cost effective) ? Any url's, links to tutorials about the subject
> will be most welcome...
>
> All the Best,
>
>         Allan

as far as brands go:
3 Com 3c905's are EXCELLENT they do 10/100MBps
Netgear hubs

If you go the linux route (I'd recommend FreeBSD is your more UNIX
inclined)
you'll need it setup like this:
upstream-----[router box]---[8port hub]----[machine 1]
            {2 NIC's}          \ \ \------[machine 2]
                                \ \ \-----[machine 3]
                                 \ \------[machine 4]
                                  \-------[machine 5]

so your need a total of 7 network cards an eightport hub and an extra
machine
keep in mind that the FreeBSD/Linux box doesn't need to be anything more
than a cheap 486dx266 as all it is is a router
you need to get the following setup on it to have it work
DHCP server
IPNAT (IP Network address translation) [OR] IP masquerade

you could get real fancy and not use DHCP and statically assign the
machines IP addresses but DHCP will be the simplest way
I figure $40 per NIC
        $50 for a hub
        $50 cabling (IF their close together)
        $70 for a 486
about 5 hours (maybe more/ maybe less) getting the server to work
correctly AFTER everything is connected.

if you DO decide to go this route make the DHCP server give out IP
addresses that are NOT part of the internet usually 10.0.0.X or
192.168.X.X.
as far as services go if you use linux I'd recommend turning OFF all
UNUSED services such as chargen,finger, just about everything. for
security reasons.

How UNIX inclined are you? I hope you know your way around a unix
filesystem  if your going to attempt this. you can contact me off the
list if you have some questions. I AM NOT the LINUX GUY! I don't use
linux and haven't in a long time. I DO know a some things about FreeBSD.

               Damon Hopkins

2000\05\07@230238 by Mark Willis

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(If anyone had problems sending me e-mail, please re-send;  My ISP
somehow "Un-Personed" me for a few hours from 8PM yesterday to 2PM
today, Grrr.)

My setup here is heading for IPRoute on one Dos old machine, (could be a
486DX2/66 with 1Mb RAM, a 386sx16 will work if you "just" have a 56k
modem) - with a NIC and modem, cable modem, or ISDN modem to connect to
the 'Net, on the IPRoute box, then either 10Base2 or 10BaseT between the
machines, or 100BaseX if you have the money.

Other options are a Linux firewall, "WinGate", and I've heard of others
but don't remember them offhand.  If you don't set security (esp. on
WinGate!) to reasonable levels, expect Spammers to "borrow" your
computer to relay their tripe, and your ISP to harass you severely.  If
I were up to speed on Linux I'd go that way, not quite yet.

My machines are all running 10Base2, am moving to 10BaseT for many in
the work clusters as I get to it.  (All kinds of OS's, Dos, Win3.x,
Win95, Linux coming soon.)

SMC NICs seem pretty good for lower priced NICs;  some people really
like 3Com but I find 'em pricey - I've had good luck with Compex as
well.  I'm sure others have other experiences.  I like to just get one
brand/model, makes swapping cards to troubleshoot easy.

Forget 10Base5 - "AUI" - it's a pain for most everyone (YMMV.)

I get Combo (10Base2 & 10BaseT & 10Base5) cards - more re-sellable, more
flexible.  Can sometimes get them for $3 or so at the local swap meets,
fairly often, sometimes $1.  On the IPRoute box, you need a NIC that
there are Crynwr NIC drivers for - The rest of the NICs can be any
brand.

10Base2 has some advantages;  if you want to just run one cable backbone
(for example, if you rent, landlords gripe far less about one RG-58
cable than about 14 Cat 5 cables running down the hallway.)  I use cup
hooks to hang whatever cables I want, where-ever I want, high on the
walls;  this place's owned, that helps.

10BaseT has the advantage that you can re-use the cables fairly readily
for 100BaseX, and that a break in any one cable doesn't lock up your
whole network, just the one machine (One cat once got caught on an RG58
cable, "freaked out", and ran, tearing a cable out of a connector.
Locked up all machines on the LAN until I [quickly!] reconnected
everything.)  You need to run cables from each machine TO the hub (for
nMachines > 2, for just 2 machines you can use a crossover cable) - That
can mean a lot of cables.

I always get a 10BaseT hub with spare ports for future expansion /
visiting laptops (For 5 machines, I'd get an 8-port hub, $30ish), and
that has a BNC (10Base2) connection as well.  (Have 2, one for the front
room, one for the computer room, am moving the Pentii to 10BaseT cabling
here.  Better "switching" hubs can take all "In-Hub" traffic off the
rest of the home LAN, for home use this isn't as critical.  I use the
LAN to avoid floppies like the plague they are, print, transfer files,
...)

http://www.mischler.com/iproute/ for IPRoute info;  I think it's $50 to
register.
Pretty sure it's http://www.wingate.com/ for WinGate.
http://www.linux.org/ for Linux help.

If you cannot find hubs cheap, there's a store in Bellevue I can visit.

Read the docs at mischler.com or wingate.com or linux.org and plan
before you start - then get the LAN up and running first, and add the
Internet gate last, is my idea.

 Mark

Alan Aldaba wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2000\05\07@231523 by Brandon, Tom

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Why not go BNC and save a bundle on a Hub? If you can find BNC cards for a
decent price (new BNC or combo cards are expensive) then all you need is
cable, no hubs. Or you could look for ARCNet cards, probably find some
giving them away, only 1.5Mbps but no hubs, free cards if you're lucky.

I really wouldn't go wasting my money on 10\100 cards. With only 5 machines
I doubt your going to be using you're whole 10Mbps, especially if you're
only net sharing.

If you're not Linux\Unix savvy then Win98 has built in connection sharing
(don't know how good it is). I can highly recommend Microsoft Proxy server
as a works right out of the box setup. No stuffing around with routing
configuration or anything. Setup net connection, install proxy, share away.
But if you don't have NT\BackOffice licenses it's expensive. It'll also
allow programs such as ICQ (2000 only) and other non-proxy aware apps
through WinSock support. It also allows snazzy things like Reverse-Proxying
(servers inside proxy) with a bit of extra config.

Tom.

{Original Message removed}

2000\05\07@232809 by Mark Willis

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I have 4 PC110 ArcNet cards (8-bit) and a 4-port passive hub here, can
find at least 3 of the cards in 20 seconds or less <G>, you'd have to
figure out how to add a 5th BNC connector & buy Coax etc.  Probably
could just drill a hole and add the connector, I'd think.  I'm sure
never going to use 'em, got it all in trades.

10/100 cards can be nice, but only if you do a lot of huge file
transfers or have some high-disk-usage, diskless workstations, are they
"needed" - I find 10Base2 to be plenty for most things I do, it's just
these 50Mb huge files I transfer & when I do full HDD backups that get
sorta annoying on 10Base2, but then I do most everything "standalone"
where the LAN's semi-optional.

(All: meant to ask earlier - if you received a "No such mailbox" error
from my account earlier, please pass a copy of that to me - I need to
harass my ISP on their problems.)

$70 for a 486, Damon?  $50 with monitor, 'round here, regularly <G>

 Mark

Brandon, Tom wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2000\05\07@233224 by Damon Hopkins

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"Brandon, Tom" wrote:
>
> Why not go BNC and save a bundle on a Hub? If you can find BNC cards for a
> decent price (new BNC or combo cards are expensive) then all you need is
> cable, no hubs. Or you could look for ARCNet cards, probably find some
> giving them away, only 1.5Mbps but no hubs, free cards if you're lucky.
>
> I really wouldn't go wasting my money on 10\100 cards. With only 5 machines
> I doubt your going to be using you're whole 10Mbps, especially if you're
> only net sharing.
The key is ONLY NET SHARING much more than that and you eat up bandwidth
fast.
trying to transfer the latest netscape to all of your computers is MUCH
better at 100MBPs than 1.5, remember that MegaBits not MegaBytes so a
10MB connection isn't much more than 1 a 1 megabyte per second speed.
besides w/ a hub you can throw it in the attic and drop all the lines
into the appropriate rooms instead of zig-zaging them all over the
house. You can get cheap cards. I recommended 3c905's because of their
performance, durability (lifetime warranty), and supported OS's (I can't
think of any PC based OS that doesn't know how to use them) you can pick
up a 5 or 10 pack for a discount from some online shop.
http://www.pricewatch.com is a good start for parts.

               Damon Hopkins

2000\05\07@233853 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
   I want to network 5 computers and share internet connection among
   them... what advises can you give me to avoid problems in getting it to
   work. I want to do it in the cheapest but reliable and stable
   configuration possible.. What brands (nic, hubs) do you recommend ( the
   most cost effective) ? Any url's, links to tutorials about the subject
   will be most welcome...

Well, a hub is little more than a chip with connectors these days, and a
switch (which you'd only might need if you're running both 10 and
100mbps in the same area) isn't much more.  You might as well get a
"generic" brand at a nice low price.  Any of the "name" brands would
certainly be fine.

As for the shared connection to the internet, it depends some on how
you're connecting.  If you start talking about cable, DSL, or ISDN,
you're probably best off with whatever your ISP supports.  If you have
something (out of your control) that spews out ethernet packets, then a
hub is about all your need in addition...  If you have something that
normally drops into a PC, well... I understand you can make your PC do
some sort of routing - my parents are sharing a dialup between two PCs.

Featurewise, you can't go wrong with a cisco (and it makes the stock
price go up, which is good for me!), but they're not very "cost
effective."  Cost effective wise, your best bet is probably something
like an old 386sx running linux, but I'd expect the learning curve to be
a bit on the steep side...

BillW
cisco

2000\05\07@235138 by Des Bromilow

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Another option you may wish to consider is the trumpet software. (I think firefox is the name of the package you need)

Basically it's a software package which sits in the PCs (win platforms) and directs all external network requests to the machine with the modem attached. To set it up you will need to network the various machines using either a hub/switch, or BNC. You then configure the modem on one machine (as per normal) and configure firefox on all of the machines. It doesn't matter which machine requires the web access, the dial up ISP connection will be brought up if required, and if it's already up, it won't try a second time.

In all it's reported to be a very "user friendly" way of setting up what you want in a windows environment. It doesn't offer any protection, or serious features, but if you can install and setup windows applications, Firefox is a possible answer.
It doesn't require any additional machines, and a free trial version is availble from the manufacturer's website. (the company is trumpet, and they're based in Tasmania, Australia)

I hope this information is of some assistance.

if money's no object..... Then go with a formal solution like Cisco (my company is a cisco network provider... pity cisco will never give me a freebie sample like a 16xx... but it's good gear) or establish a linux server solution.

Des Bromilow

>>> William Chops Westfield <.....billwKILLspamspam@spam@CISCO.COM> 5/8/00 1:38:15 pm >>>
   I want to network 5 computers and share internet connection among
   them... what advises can you give me to avoid problems in getting it to
   work. I want to do it in the cheapest but reliable and stable
   configuration possible.. What brands (nic, hubs) do you recommend ( the
   most cost effective) ? Any url's, links to tutorials about the subject
   will be most welcome...

Well, a hub is little more than a chip with connectors these days, and a
switch (which you'd only might need if you're running both 10 and
100mbps in the same area) isn't much more.  You might as well get a
"generic" brand at a nice low price.  Any of the "name" brands would
certainly be fine.

As for the shared connection to the internet, it depends some on how
you're connecting.  If you start talking about cable, DSL, or ISDN,
you're probably best off with whatever your ISP supports.  If you have
something (out of your control) that spews out ethernet packets, then a
hub is about all your need in addition...  If you have something that
normally drops into a PC, well... I understand you can make your PC do
some sort of routing - my parents are sharing a dialup between two PCs.

Featurewise, you can't go wrong with a cisco (and it makes the stock
price go up, which is good for me!), but they're not very "cost
effective."  Cost effective wise, your best bet is probably something
like an old 386sx running linux, but I'd expect the learning curve to be
a bit on the steep side...

BillW
cisco

2000\05\08@000553 by Andrew E. Kalman

picon face
Re:
>    I want to network 5 computers and share internet connection among
>them... what advises can you give me to avoid problems in getting it to
>work. I want to do it in the cheapest but reliable and stable
>configuration possible.. What brands (nic, hubs) do you recommend  ( the
You may want to consider the LinkSys Cable Modem / DSL Router -- it
includes a 4-port 10/100 _switch_ (better than a hub), and costs very
little ($159 at buy.com). It runs Linux, but you can't see  that -- all
configuration is done through a web browser.

I was running a Linux Firewall / Router (NetMAX) built on a cheapo P-120
when I was accessing the Internet through a modem. When I had DSL
installed, I bought the LinkSys box because I knew it would be quicker than
installing another network card into the Linux box and configuring it
properly. I have >5 Macs, PCs and Linux boxes all surfing the web through
the LinkSys now, and the security appears to be quite good (all external
port scans come up with nothing). The LinkSys box does NAT, VPN, DMZ
support, port blocking, port forwarding, static / dynamic routing, PPPoE,
etc. -- it's quite full-featured, and available just about anywhere -- even
Radio Shacks sells it!

Of course to add a 5th computer to a setup using the LinkSys, you'd have to
have a cheap hub or something hanging off one of the switch's 4 ports, so
we're talking around $200 + the cost of the NICs in the PCs.



______________________________________
 Andrew E. Kalman, Ph.D.   aekspamKILLspamnetcom.com

2000\05\08@001554 by simo

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face
It's all explained in Silicon Chip magazine in plain ol'english. Too much to
mention. Basically it all comes in box.
Best of luck. http://www.siliconchip.com.au

{Original Message removed}

2000\05\08@005546 by Rob Zero

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----- Original Message -----
From: William Chops Westfield <.....billwKILLspamspam.....CISCO.COM>
To: <EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Sunday, May 07, 2000 10:38 PM
Subject: Re: [OT] sharing net connection


... I understand you can make your PC do
> some sort of routing - my parents are sharing a dialup between two PCs.
>
One prog comes with the linksys FESWSK5 Switched network in a box.. Its
called Lanbridge and it can support unlimited # of users.. really neat. Now,
I cant wait for DSL or cable to get into my area.

Rob

2000\05\08@012734 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
From: "Brandon, Tom" <Tomspamspam_OUTPSY.UNSW.EDU.AU>

   go BNC and save a bundle on a Hub? If you can find BNC cards for a
   decent price (new BNC or combo cards are expensive) then all you need is
   cable, no hubs. Or you could look for ARCNet cards, probably find some
   giving them away, only 1.5Mbps but no hubs, free cards if you're lucky.

   I really wouldn't go wasting my money on 10\100 cards. With only 5
   machines I doubt your going to be using you're whole 10Mbps, especially
   if you're only net sharing.

Here in the states, 10baset ethernet cards are going for about $10, with
8 port hubs going for about $40.  Allowing for 10base2 (thinnet) adds
cost to your ethernet cards and makes your cabling more expensive.
Short of unusually successful dumpster diving, I doubt whether you can
put together an 8 port thinnet (or ArcNet) network for less than a
(brand new, "highly supported") 10baseT net using a hub...

It's pretty amazing when some technology hits that magic volume that allows
prices to plumet to this degree, and it's annoying when you miss it.  (I
rather missed the transition to 10baseT *only* NIC cards myself, and it came
as a bit of a surprise.  The big cost savings is that you can get most of
the 10baseT circuitry on the same chip as the MAC/PHY stuff, and do away
with expensive bits like the DC-DC converter that used to be ubiquitous on
ethernet cards.)

BillW

2000\05\08@023117 by vmlists

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> Here in the states, 10baset ethernet cards are going for about $10, with 8
> port hubs going for about $40.  Allowing for 10base2 (thinnet) adds cost
> to your ethernet cards and makes your cabling more expensive. Short of
> unusually successful dumpster diving, I doubt whether you can put together
> an 8 port thinnet (or ArcNet) network for less than a (brand new, "highly
> supported") 10baseT net using a hub...

I can buy new ISA combo cards locally (in Dallas, TX) for about
$13 ea. This is from a local retail store, not a mail order
house. These are plug-n-play capable, but also have jumpers so
you can "hardwire" the configuration if you want (great if you're
using Linux or anything else that the supplied drivers don't
support). And I can buy new pre-terminated 10base2 coax cables
for lower cost per foot than 10baseT cables from a local discount
electronics store. This is not unusual. Many mail order suppliers
also price 10baseT cables lower than 10base2
(http://www.computergate.com for example). The "T" connectors
come with the cards, and only two terminators are needed for an
entire network (about $1 ea., unless you buy them from someplace
like CompUSA or Best Buy, that tend to have very high markups on
very small items).

Even if combo cards end up costing 2 or 3 dollars more than
10baseT only, this is partly offset by the lower cost of the
cabling. If the net difference is $2 per computer, and your
network has 8 computers, then that's $16 in extra card expense
plus $2 in terminators vs. $40 for the 8 port hub that you don't
have to buy. So at least where I live, you definitely can build a
10base2 network for less money than 10baseT. If you have less
than 8 computers, it works out even better.

Pretty small difference though. And of course, you can't re-use
the cabling if you want to upgrade to 100baseT later. That can be
especially important if you have to install cables in walls and
ceilings, though not such a big deal for a lan that lives
entirely in a single room. On the plus side though, 10base2
cables can span longer distances.


---
                                       Peace,
                                       William Kitchen

The future is ours to create.

2000\05\08@055011 by Ian Wilkinson

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On Mon, 08 May 2000 in "Re: [OT] sharing net connection", you wrote:
>At 10:13 AM 5/8/00 +0800, you wrote:
>>Hi all,
>>
>>    I want to network 5 computers and share internet connection among
>>them... what advises can you give me to avoid problems in getting it to
>>work. I want to do it in the cheapest but reliable and stable
>>configuration possible.. What brands (nic, hubs) do you recommend  ( the
>
>I use a Linux box as a masquerading firewall between a broadband net
>connection and my internal LAN with a handful of computers on it. The
>firewall machine thus has two Nic's in it. The LAN runs TCP/IP over
>Ethernet connections (thinnet, so no hubs). The technology isn't all
>that important if it meets your speed requirements and is supported..
>Linux support for 10/100 is not 100% at this time.

If you use PCI network cards and an external modem (Non-USB) Linux will
support it and windows will work with them almost instantly.  You can have
IPMasq with dial on demand PPP setup and going within a couple of hours, and
that includes time to install Linux on a slow computer like a 486...

>
>Advantages:     pretty much bulletproof security, very stable O/S
>                        especially if you only run basic services
>
>                        built in web server, FTP server etc.

It also Just works.  A friend of mine has a Linux firewall, he know nothing
about Linux or *nix, but he doesn't have to, as the computer just sits there
turns on PPP demand dialing at 1800 when it becomes free, and the turns it off
at 23:59, just before he has to start paying for it.

I've seen a lot of Windows based IPMasq/Firewall packages
and they all crash and die at regular intervals.  The only reason the my Linux
IPMasq/Firewall computer was shutdown was the I was moving it from one part of
the country to the other.

>
>Disadvantages:  another machine (may be considered an advantage!)
>
>                        can't run "risky" software like netmeeting and ICQ
>                        on the LAN
>
>                        non-trivial to set up

You can run things like ICQ, and it has special options for things like
Doom, Quake and ftp so you can go direct onto the 'net with them, or if you are
worried about security you can just turn those modules off...

You don't need the expensive of a screen, as the linux box will work very well
just via Telnet.

If you're looking at network cards stick to PCI cards. 3Com cards are good if
you want to feel that you are getting something good because it costs more, or
get Netgear if you want something that just works, but may be 1% slower.  My
Netgear cards cost #15 (~$22USD) each and can do 10Mb/s or 100Mb/s half or full
duplex they are Twisted pair so we have a hub.  We have a 100Mb/s backbone,
with a small hub that has the Linux firewall on it and some other old
computers.  This is a 10BaseT hub with an uplink port at 100Mb/s.  You don't
need 100BaseT for the internet even on a cable modem, but it's a lot better for
moving files about the network.

If you decide to go down this route, I will be happy to provide assistance.


Ian.
--
Churchill's Commentary on man:
Man will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time he
will pick himself up and continue on.

Uptime at  8:47am  up 7 days, 19:06,  4 users,

2000\05\08@062618 by Morgan Olsson

picon face
I«ll just post the link to the Viking Server, which i have been running for years in background on one of my Win9x machines, although it is designed for heavier load it is not memory or CPU hungry.
Very fast & good proxy, can handle several GB, also internal mail, can be HTTP server and a lot of other things too, There is a user discussion list, free trial

http:/http://www.robtex.com/viking

/Morgan

2000\05\08@080120 by Andrew Kunz

flavicon
face
I use a ISP-150 from http://www.jdr.com to connect all the machines at the house to the
net.  Only about $150 when I bought it a couple years ago.  It's a decent
firewall and DHCP server too.

Andy









Alan Aldaba <@spam@allenKILLspamspamSUPER.NET.PH> on 05/07/2000 10:13:40 PM

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Subject: [OT] sharing net connection








Hi all,

   I want to network 5 computers and share internet connection among
them... what advises can you give me to avoid problems in getting it to
work. I want to do it in the cheapest but reliable and stable
configuration possible.. What brands (nic, hubs) do you recommend  ( the

most cost effective) ? Any url's, links to tutorials about the subject
will be most welcome...

All the Best,

       Allan

2000\05\08@103226 by vmlists

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face
>     I want to network 5 computers and share internet connection among
> them... what advises can you give me to avoid problems in getting it to
> work. I want to do it in the cheapest but reliable and stable
> configuration possible.. What brands (nic, hubs) do you recommend  ( the

A very simple and cheap solution I've had good results with in
the past is a combination of two freeware packages.

The first is a very simple proxy called Vsocks Light
(http://www.pscs.co.uk/software/vsockslight.html). It provides
socks4 proxy, auto dialing via DUN, and pretty much nothing else.
No cache, no protocol specific proxies, no mail server, etc. Just
small and simple.

The second is the Hummingbird Socks Client
(http://www.hummingbird.com/products/nc/socks/index.html). You
could live without this by configuring all the applications
(browsers, emailers, etc.) to use the proxy, but this software
makes things easier by making the socks proxy transparent to the
applications. Just install the Hummingbird client on each of the
machines (except the one running the proxy), then your apps won't
have to know anything about the proxy. Makes life much easier.

This arrangement works great for most applications. It does have
some limitations though. Vsocks Light does not support UDP, so
some applications such as ICQ won't work (IM works fine though).

The cost is zero, installation is easy, and it's very low
maintenance once it's set up.


---
                                       Peace,
                                       William Kitchen

The future is ours to create.

2000\05\08@142258 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
   It also Just works.  A friend of mine has a Linux firewall, he know
   nothing about Linux or *nix,

[Visions of "firewall" with telnet server, and root password set to "root."]

While windows is the operating system most susceptible to viri, unix is
probably the operating system most susceptible to breakins.  Running linux
as a security measure, when you don't understand it at all, is not
something that makes me feel very "warm and fuzzy."

BillW

2000\05\08@142922 by Quitt, Walter

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face
There are plenty of resources that tell you how to set
up your linux box to minimize or eliminate the obvious
holes.  I just hope I didn't miss one, myself.  -W

{Original Message removed}

2000\05\08@181856 by paulb

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face
Didn't get to send this yesterday.

http://www.psychosis.com/linux-router/ is the version that loads on a
(hard) diskless machine.  Requires 1.44M boot floppy and 8M or so of
RAM.

 But - thre seems to be a fair bit of reading to do, or else I'm just
a bit vague after reading the site.  I haven't it up and running yet on
my own.  I have used one provided to me - until the ISP local router
crashed and answered calls but failed logins.  Silly beggar caused me to
be charged for 800 local phone calls overnight (at 25¢ each).

 I *now* use a D-link. http://www.dlink.com/products/

--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

2000\05\08@194530 by Kevin Maciunas

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picon face
I didn't want to add to the OT stuff but...

If you really want a turn-key solution to the problem, go to
http://www.freesco.org - these guys have a 1 floppy solution to the
problem of building a ppp dial-up, firewall, up to 4 directly connected
ethernets, provision of dial-in access, printer sharing etc etc.  All
you need is an old 486 box, a floppy drive, ethernet card and away you
go.

I use this at home, my machines here run Linux, but my daughters use
W-9x and all engage in ICQ sessions and all the other stuff teenage
persons do - all without a hitch.

Zero knowledge of Linux is required to configure the freesco stuff, and
once you do the initial config you can use a web interface to change the
config (yes, 1.44Mb includes a full linux kernel, web server, telnet
server and a host of other stuff - try that will Bill's Bloatware
sometime - should appeal to guys who like to squeeze everything into 1Kw
+ 60bytes of RAM!).

Cheers
/Kevin
--
Kevin J. Maciunas                               spamBeGonekevinspamBeGonespamcs.adelaide.edu.au
Department of Computer Science  PH: +61-8-8303-5586
The University of Adelaide              FAX:+61-8-8303-4366
Adelaide 5005 South Australia

2000\05\08@222305 by Ian Wilkinson

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face
On Mon, 08 May 2000 in "Re: [OT] sharing net connection", you wrote:
>It also Just works.  A friend of mine has a Linux firewall, he know
>    nothing about Linux or *nix,
>
>[Visions of "firewall" with telnet server, and root password set to "root."]
>
>While windows is the operating system most susceptible to viri, unix is
>probably the operating system most susceptible to breakins.  Running linux
>as a security measure, when you don't understand it at all, is not
>something that makes me feel very "warm and fuzzy."

Admittedly I set up the Linux box for him, and setup the security.  It's better
than just having a windows box connected to the net and far more stable.  The
point I was trying to make (and failed to do so) was that it just sits there
and runs without any need for help.

You should set it up so that if anyone made it into the box, it's got such a
minimal installation the cracker would have to download so many different utils
just to see if there were any windows computers on the network it's not worth
it...

It's quite amusing finding a box that doesn't even have ping...

Ian.
--
First thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers.
- Dick the Butcher in Shakespeare's Henry VI

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