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'[OT] i2c obtaining address'
2007\05\17@151232 by Lee Marshall

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from wikipedias i2c article:
  As of October 1, 2006, no licensing fees are required to implement the
I²C protocol. However, fees are still required in order to obtain I²C slave
addresses.

what exactly is "obtaining a slave address". i thought the slave devices had
leads which you could pull to vdd or vss which defined the address of the
device.

also, what is "implementing". if i did want to communicate with a device
which used a serial protocol that needed licensing fees, would i need to pay
a licensing fee if i used a uart?
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View this message in context: www.nabble.com/i2c-obtaining-address-tf3773781.html#a10670534
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2007\05\17@154749 by Dario Greggio

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Lee Marshall wrote:

> what exactly is "obtaining a slave address". i thought the slave devices had
> leads which you could pull to vdd or vss which defined the address of the
> device.
> also, what is "implementing". if i did want to communicate with a device
> which used a serial protocol that needed licensing fees, would i need to pay
> a licensing fee if i used a uart?

Well, this deals with "implementing": i.e. it's you who are placing
there Jumpers or Leads to choose address :)
It is also you who create the device, write its software or design its
hardware. I used to know that a license was somewhat needed for that: I
barely took a SW implementation of Slave I2C device and prototyped it,
so I did not care about licensing. Anyway, the one from Wiki is good news.


--
Ciao, Dario

2007\05\17@161110 by peter green

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> what exactly is "obtaining a slave address". i thought the slave
> devices had
> leads which you could pull to vdd or vss which defined the address of the
> device.
If you read the linked site they basically say that you give them your application area and the number of user selectable bits in your address and they try and find you an address that will give the best possibilities for using a device in systems with other I2C devices. In other words it looks like its clearly aimed at IC vendors not at those integrating the ICs into a system.


2007\05\17@183943 by Herbert Graf

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On Thu, 2007-05-17 at 12:12 -0700, Lee Marshall wrote:
> from wikipedias i2c article:
>    As of October 1, 2006, no licensing fees are required to implement the
> I²C protocol. However, fees are still required in order to obtain I²C slave
> addresses.
>
> what exactly is "obtaining a slave address". i thought the slave devices had
> leads which you could pull to vdd or vss which defined the address of the
> device.

All I2C devices need a slave address so they know when the master is
talking to them.

Many I2C devices have pins you can strap high or low to choose from a
small number of addresses.

That said, it sounds like if you make an I2C device, you have to apply
to have a slave address (or range of addresses) assigned to you.

TTYL

2007\05\17@184107 by Herbert Graf

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On Thu, 2007-05-17 at 21:47 +0200, Dario Greggio wrote:
> Lee Marshall wrote:
>
> > what exactly is "obtaining a slave address". i thought the slave devices had
> > leads which you could pull to vdd or vss which defined the address of the
> > device.
> > also, what is "implementing". if i did want to communicate with a device
> > which used a serial protocol that needed licensing fees, would i need to pay
> > a licensing fee if i used a uart?
>
> Well, this deals with "implementing": i.e. it's you who are placing
> there Jumpers or Leads to choose address :)

No, all you're doing is selecting which of the "addresses approved for
that device" you want to use.

If you are creating a slave device (i.e. software I2C) then I have no
idea what you are supposed to do.

TTYL

2007\05\17@185911 by peter green

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> If you are creating a slave device (i.e. software I2C) then I have no
> idea what you are supposed to do.
they don't say anything about it being illegal to use addresses without thier approval and i'd imagine they'd say so if it was. If your device can be programed to any address then it can be made interoperable with anything with a configuration and most stuff piclisters are building probablly can be.

If on the other hand you are getting custom silicon made and only support a limited range of addresses (probablly because your addresses setting is made through stapping pins up and down and you can only spare a limited number of pins) then it would certainly make sense to look for an official assignment.



2007\05\17@211612 by Bob Axtell

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peter green wrote:
>> If you are creating a slave device (i.e. software I2C) then I have no
>> idea what you are supposed to do.
>>    
> they don't say anything about it being illegal to use addresses without thier approval and i'd imagine they'd say so if it was. If your device can be programed to any address then it can be made interoperable with anything with a configuration and most stuff piclisters are building probablly can be.
>
> If on the other hand you are getting custom silicon made and only support a limited range of addresses (probablly because your addresses setting is made through stapping pins up and down and you can only spare a limited number of pins) then it would certainly make sense to look for an official assignment.
>
>
>
>  
I _believe_ that  NV Philips'  patent has expired  (issued in the 1960's,
reissued once more, now over 40 years old) in most countries, so the
license fee business is over...

--Bob Axtell

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