Searching \ for '[OT] Wire Twister' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=wire+twister
Search entire site for: 'Wire Twister'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT] Wire Twister'
1998\11\19@202139 by Tony Nixon

flavicon
picon face
Hi all,

Just thought I'd pass this along as a help snippet for those that get
peeved while twisting wire ends ready for soldering. I've been using
this method for a while and it helps.

Begin stripping the insulation from the wire but do not take it all the
way off.

Grap the insulation by the thumb and forefinger and give a twist.

You will end up with a bee-yootiful twisted wire end ready to solder.

Trim off the excess wire and insulation.

--
Best regards

Tony

Multimedia 16F84 Beginners PIC Tools.

http://www.picnpoke.com
Email spam_OUTpicnpokeTakeThisOuTspamcdi.com.au

1998\11\19@211159 by Reginald Neale

flavicon
face
>Just thought I'd pass this along as a help snippet for those that get
>peeved while twisting wire ends ready for soldering. I've been using
>this method for a while and it helps.
>
>Begin stripping the insulation from the wire but do not take it all the
>way off.
>
>Grap the insulation by the thumb and forefinger and give a twist.
>
>You will end up with a bee-yootiful twisted wire end ready to solder.
>
>Trim off the excess wire and insulation.
>
Tony:

This additional tip may be a no-brainer, but your trick also works great
when you have a single stranded wire that you want to tin the end of. Just
don't pull the insulation slug all the way off, and it'll keep all those
wayward strands neatly together while you apply solder.

Reg Neale

1998\11\19@231013 by paulb

flavicon
face
Tony Nixon wrote:

> Begin stripping the insulation from the wire but do not take it all
> the way off.

> Grap the insulation by the thumb and forefinger and give a twist.

> You will end up with a bee-yootiful twisted wire end ready to solder.

 That's certainly an old trick of mine, best performed with one of
those "auto" wire-strippers with blades that close with various sized
notches.  That's the best I can describe them.

 As I tin all wire tips, I now tend to strip about 1mm of insulation,
tin the projecting part to bond the strands together, then grab that tip
with the pliers, pull the insulation back, twist the bare part with the
pliers then tin the twisted bare part.  As it is tinned, the softened
insulation "creeps" back over the bare, tinned wire, usually leaving a
suitable length still exposed for the connection.

 The significance of this method is that the stiffened, tinned area
extends well under the insulation.  If the tinning stops at the
insulation, you have the tinned part stiffened by the solder, the un-
tinned part stiffened by the insulation, and the wire of course breaks
at the junction between the two.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1998\11\20@062809 by Russell McMahon

picon face
A warning about this practice.
If a wire end is being used in a clamp or screw type terminal block
it should NOT be tinned like this. In fact, for mains terminations,
under some wiring codes (certainly those in force in our country) it
is specifically forbidden.

There is a good reason for this.
When first tinned the wire is roundish and solid, with the strands
interspersed by solder which has wicked in between them. When clamped
the clamping force is taken up by the solder/wire bundle. With time
the solder will allow the wire end to "creep" and the termination
will loosen. This may lead to a bad joint, a high resistance joint or
a broken joint. If there is significant current flowing the heat
generated may be destructive.

An allowed practice is to tin the tip only but leave the bulk of
wires away from the tip bare -the  clamping takes place on the bare
wires.

Given all the above, I have tinned and clamped wires for many (many,
many, ...) years using both screw and rising clamp type terminal
blocks with no failures that I am aware of due to the above. However,
....

From: Paul B. Webster VK2BZC <.....paulbKILLspamspam@spam@midcoast.com.au>

>Tony Nixon wrote:
>
>> Begin stripping the insulation from the wire but do not take it
all
>> the way off.
>
>> Grap the insulation by the thumb and forefinger and give a twist.
>
>> You will end up with a bee-yootiful twisted wire end ready to
solder.
>
>  That's certainly an old trick of mine, best performed with one of
>those "auto" wire-strippers with blades that close with various
sized
>notches.  That's the best I can describe them.
>
>  As I tin all wire tips, I now tend to strip about 1mm of
insulation,
>tin the projecting part to bond the strands together, then grab that
tip
>with the pliers, pull the insulation back, twist the bare part with
the
>pliers then tin the twisted bare part.  As it is tinned, the
softened
>insulation "creeps" back over the bare, tinned wire, usually leaving
a
>suitable length still exposed for the connection.
>
>  The significance of this method is that the stiffened, tinned area
>extends well under the insulation.  If the tinning stops at the
>insulation, you have the tinned part stiffened by the solder, the
un-
>tinned part stiffened by the insulation, and the wire of course
breaks
>at the junction between the two.
>--
>  Cheers,
>        Paul B.
>

1998\11\20@120451 by John Payson

flavicon
face
|  As I tin all wire tips, I now tend to strip about 1mm of insulation,
|tin the projecting part to bond the strands together, then grab that tip
|with the pliers, pull the insulation back, twist the bare part with the
|pliers then tin the twisted bare part.  As it is tinned, the softened
|insulation "creeps" back over the bare, tinned wire, usually leaving a
|suitable length still exposed for the connection.

I've found that different types of insulation seem to behave
differently when heated; sometimes even different colored wires
within the same cable may be different.

In one project which used lots of 5-wire solid-copper cable, it
turned out that all but one of the wires' insulation would tend
to "shrink back" away from the end of the wire when the wire was
heated.  It turned out that--since cutting the wire would expose
a tiny bit of copper--that touching the copper with the iron would
cause the insulation to creep back exposing just the right amount
of copper.  Anyone else ever done anything like that?

1998\11\21@074146 by Mark Willis

flavicon
face
Russell McMahon wrote:
>
> A warning about this practice.
> <snipped>
> An allowed practice is to tin the tip only but leave the bulk of
> wires away from the tip bare -the  clamping takes place on the bare
> wires.

 It's good practice to go through the electrical box & do maintenance
checkups every now & then anyways.  I cannot count the number of times
I've caught clamped wires corroding, causing heat problems (My
preference?  Solder 'em, and then carefully re-tighten the clamp
periodically, OR, use a good anti-corrosive grease but that's usually
really nasty to mess with.  Don't always get to go with my preference,
though...)  Seattle's really rainy tonight (Heavy rain & wind storms,
think I'll start building an Ark tomorrow if this keeps up!)  Had a
2-second power outage earlier & numerous glitches, glad I am not a power
or phone lineman tonight...

 Also, those aluminum wires need anti-corrosion treatment every now &
then;  I've caught a few heat problems on older houses by glancing at
their breaker box, by all means hire an electrician if you don't do
mains work enough, but I figure if my blind friend Mary could re-wire
her house (With the right tools and some care!), anyone on the PIC list
can do it.  (Sometimes it's just quicker to hire someone, though.  None
of us get over-busy, right!?)

 Mark, mwillisspamKILLspamnwlink.com

1998\11\21@205323 by Mark A Moss

picon face
On Fri, 20 Nov 1998 15:07:26 +1000 "Paul B. Webster VK2BZC"
<.....paulbKILLspamspam.....midcoast.com.au> writes:

>
>  The significance of this method is that the stiffened, tinned area
>extends well under the insulation.  If the tinning stops at the
>insulation, you have the tinned part stiffened by the solder, the un-
>tinned part stiffened by the insulation, and the wire of course
>breaks
>at the junction between the two.
>--
>  Cheers,
>        Paul B.
>

If you use flux, allow the flux to wick down inside the insulations
slightly.  The flux helps draw the molten solder down inside the
insulation, achieving the same result.  You should probably use a flux
that won't tend to cause corrosion.

BTW, when a Pace came to my company to give solder classes, he told the
students not to do this.  The reason was that, although the wire is more
likely to break, at least it breaks outside the insulation where trouble
shooting is easier.  My belief is that it's best not to have the wire
break in the first place.

Mark Moss
Amateur Radio Operator, Technician, and General Tinkerer

___________________________________________________________________
You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html
or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]

1998\11\22@181703 by Morgan Olsson

picon face
At 01:33 1998-11-22 +0000, Mark Moss wrote:
-snip-

>  The flux helps draw the molten solder down inside the
>insulation, achieving the same result.  You should probably use a flux
>that won't tend to cause corrosion.
>
>BTW, when a Pace came to my company to give solder classes, he told the
>students not to do this.  The reason was that, although the wire is more
>likely to break, at least it breaks outside the insulation where trouble
>shooting is easier.  My belief is that it's best not to have the wire
>break in the first place.

Yes, but in my experience cables break much *less* when they are tinned by
this method up a mm or two inside the insulation.
Because the insulation makes the bend much smoother.
That is, for small movements like vibration etc.

For large wire movements like when the wire is pulled around making sharp
bends directly at the solder joint then instead the tinned stiff wire will
break earlier than an untinned flexible multistrand joint.  But of course i
always clamp such cables!

As always, adjust your methods to the application       :)

/Morgan


       Morgan Olsson                   ph  +46(0)414 70741
       MORGANS REGLERTEKNIK            fax +46(0)414 70331
       H€LLEKS           (in A-Z letters: "HALLEKAS")
       SE-277 35 KIVIK, SWEDEN               EraseMEmrtspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTiname.com
___________________________________________________________

1998\11\23@222714 by Russell McMahon

picon face
**** Professional wiring standards flame shields up ****

A truly horrible method which, none-the-less seems to work, when
terminating wires in terminal blocks is as follows. I almost blush to
promulgate this as I'm SURE that all the experts will explain why you
shouldn't do it, but  judge for yourself whether it is useful.

At one stage I did some work on taxi computers installed in cars.
These were wired in with screw down terminal blocks (no rising clamps
here!). There were 100+ computers involved and they were about 4+
years old so they represented a reasonable sample. Some person
unknown had used the following method to terminate the wires on SOME
of the computers. These "seemed" to have a lower incidence of broken
wires over a period for several years while I was involved with them.
I didn't, unfortunately, do a methodical tally on faults versus
termination method but was convinced enough that, in due course, I
adopted the method on all computers in this system that I dealt with.

i    Strip wire as usual. Tin or not etc as desired.

           XXXXX-----------

ii    Double the stripped end of the wire over onto the insulated
portion.
   (or the bare wire could be longer and wound around the insulated
end in a short spiral.
                     ___                                 _
              XXXXXI         or         XXXXX\\\\\XI

iii    Clamp with screw or clamp onto combined insulation and wire.
                         |
                      _\/_
              XXXXXI

I have discussed this method with a competent experienced friend and
we concluded that

i     It couldn't improve things.
ii    Various reasons why it would work if in fact it was found that
it did :-)

The method has its limitations.
The wire end should be under the screw/clamp or 180 degrees around
from it.
The insulation is cratered by the screw end.
Wiring inspectors and competent friends will look askance at you.
...................



**** Professional wiring standards flame shields still up :-)  ****

{Original Message removed}

1998\11\24@180147 by Brian Striggow

flavicon
face
I like this idea a lot.  I plan to use it whenever I know noone will
ever see the work.

> i    Strip wire as usual. Tin or not etc as desired.
>
> ii    Double the stripped end of the wire over onto the insulated
> portion.
>     (or the bare wire could be longer and wound around the insulated
> end in a short spiral.
>                       ___                                 _
>                XXXXXI         or         XXXXX\\\\\XI
>
> iii    Clamp with screw or clamp onto combined insulation and wire.
>                           |
>                        _\/_
>                XXXXXI

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1998 , 1999 only
- Today
- New search...