Searching \ for '[OT] Windows 7 striped volume boot' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=windows+striped
Search entire site for: 'Windows 7 striped volume boot'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT] Windows 7 striped volume boot'
2012\02\14@201621 by V G

picon face
Hi all,

Can I make two drives into a Windows spanned volume and install to it and
boot from it? This is NOT a BIOS fake RAID or a hardware raid card, it's
simply a fully Windows-managed RAID 0 striped volume. I googled, but can't
really find any information on how to install Windows to it and boot from
it

2012\02\14@204221 by Bob Ammerman

flavicon
face
What edition of Windows (home premium/pro/ultimate)

-- Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems

----- Original Message ----- From: "V G" <spam_OUTx.solarwind.xTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com>
To: "PICLIST" <.....piclistKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, February 14, 2012 8:16 PM
Subject: [OT] Windows 7 striped volume boot


> Hi all,
>
> Can I make two drives into a Windows spanned volume and install to it and
> boot from it? This is NOT a BIOS fake RAID or a hardware raid card, it's
> simply a fully Windows-managed RAID 0 striped volume. I googled, but can't
> really find any information on how to install Windows to it and boot from
> it.
> -

2012\02\14@204908 by Bob Ammerman

flavicon
face
Just  a suggestion:

Leave C as a small normal volume, but move your paging file and data storage to a striped volume for performance. Remember that with your data split over two drives you basically have twice the chance of losing it.

-- Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems


{Original Message removed}

2012\02\14@224831 by V G

picon face
On Tue, Feb 14, 2012 at 8:49 PM, Bob Ammerman <picramspamKILLspamroadrunner.com> wrote:

> Just  a suggestion:
>
> Leave C as a small normal volume, but move your paging file and data
> storage
> to a striped volume for performance. Remember that with your data split
> over
> two drives you basically have twice the chance of losing it.
>
> -- Bob Ammerman
> RAm Systems
>

1. Windows 7 professional

2. I absolutely want the boot drive to be on RAID 0. I have more than
enough RAM and don't even use a swap file. I don't care for performance
from my data drive. And I don't mind even if it's 10x the chance of that
RAID drive crashing. I have daily partition backups and can revert to them
anytime

2012\02\15@044915 by cdb
flavicon
face
Not answering this particular question, but the new, in Windows 8 (Server to begin with, PC later on, should be in the customer preview version at the end of this month), ReFS (Resilient File System) would be better than RAID 0, though you still need to have the OS on a standard MBR/GPT partition.

Colin
--
cdb, .....colinKILLspamspam.....btech-online.co.uk on 15/02/2012
Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk   Hosted by:  http://www.justhost.com.au
 This email is to be considered private if addressed to a named  individual or Personnel Department, and public if addressed to a blog,  forum or news article.

2012\02\15@091949 by M.L.

flavicon
face
On Wed, Feb 15, 2012 at 4:49 AM, cdb <EraseMEcolinspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTbtech-online.co.uk> wrote:
> Not answering this particular question, but the new, in Windows 8 (Server
> to begin with, PC later on, should be in the customer preview version at
> the end of this month), ReFS (Resilient File System) would be better than
> RAID 0, though you still need to have the OS on a standard MBR/GPT
> partition.
>
> Colin
> --

Colin is that a competitor of sorts to ZFS?


-- Martin K

2012\02\15@150623 by cdb

flavicon
face
On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 09:19:09 -0500, M.L. wrote:
::
:: Colin is that a competitor of sorts to ZFS?

I think so, it has fixed 128KB slices, drives can be hot added and removed from a system with automatic repair and reconstruction of data.

Here is a link to one of many MSDN articles on the subject.

<blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/archive/2012/01/05/virtualizing-storage-for-sca
le-resiliency-and-efficiency.aspx>

Colin
--
cdb, colinspamspam_OUTbtech-online.co.uk on 16/02/2012
Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk   Hosted by:  http://www.justhost.com.au
 This email is to be considered private if addressed to a named  individual or Personnel Department, and public if addressed to a blog,  forum or news article.
 

2012\02\15@162845 by V G

picon face
On Wed, Feb 15, 2012 at 3:06 PM, cdb <@spam@colinKILLspamspambtech-online.co.uk> wrote:

> I think so, it has fixed 128KB slices, drives can be hot added and removed
> from a system with automatic repair and reconstruction of data.
>
> Here is a link to one of many MSDN articles on the subject.
>
> <
> blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/archive/2012/01/05/virtualizing-storage-for-sca
> le-resiliency-and-efficiency.aspx<blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/archive/2012/01/05/virtualizing-storage-for-sca%0Ale-resiliency-and-efficiency.aspx>
> >
>


In any case, there's no way in hell I'd trust Microsoft with my data or for
anything serious like a server application. There's just no reason to

2012\02\16@150109 by Justin Richards

face picon face
> boot from it? This is NOT a BIOS fake RAID or a hardware raid card, it's
> simply a fully Windows-managed RAID 0 striped volume. I googled, but can't
> really find any information on how to install Windows to it and boot from
> it.

As it appears to be software RAID 0 doesn't Windows need to be up
(particular the disk management service) before it appears to be a
logical disk.  Before that it would just appear to be 2 separate
disks.  Kinda chicken/egg thing.  So I think the only way it would be
possible to boot an OS from 2 separate disks that are part of  RAID 0
would be to use hardware RAID which you dont want.

I am not all that familiar with RAIDs but it looks like the goal is to
have a zippy OS, fast boot etc but not too concerned about data
transfer speeds

2012\02\16@151911 by V G

picon face
On Thu, Feb 16, 2012 at 3:01 PM, Justin Richards
<KILLspamjustin.richardsKILLspamspamgmail.com>wrote:

>  As it appears to be software RAID 0 doesn't Windows need to be up
> (particular the disk management service) before it appears to be a
> logical disk.  Before that it would just appear to be 2 separate
> disks.  Kinda chicken/egg thing.  So I think the only way it would be
> possible to boot an OS from 2 separate disks that are part of  RAID 0
> would be to use hardware RAID which you dont want.
>
>
I would use hardware RAID if I could, but I have two massive video cards
taking up a total of 6 slots on an already large motherboard and case, and
there's no more space for RAID controllers. When I mean massive, these
things are HUGE:

http://ca.asus.com/en/Graphics_Cards/AMD_Series/EAH6950_DCII2DI4S2GD5/

I cant fit any more cards in there. The cards even cover up the SATA ports,
so I have to take out the cards to swap drives as it is.


> I am not all that familiar with RAIDs but it looks like the goal is to
> have a zippy OS, fast boot etc but not too concerned about data
> transfer speeds.
>

That's correct. I want fast boots. SIGH, I guess I'll go with BIOS fake
RAID then and keep daily backups on some other mass storage

2012\02\16@155217 by Dwayne Reid

flavicon
face
At 01:18 PM 2/16/2012, V G wrote:

>That's correct. I want fast boots. SIGH, I guess I'll go with BIOS fake
>RAID then and keep daily backups on some other mass storage.

Just coming in near the end of this thread, but why wouldn't you use a solid-state drive for your OS?  From the reports that I've read, these things reduce boot time by a full order of magnitude.

Since you are concerned with the OS booting quickly, I'd get the smallest SSD that works.  That would be somewhere near 128GB for me (OS plus whatever programs need to run at boot time).

You can use conventional hard drives for your other storage needs.

dwayne

-- Dwayne Reid   <RemoveMEdwaynerTakeThisOuTspamplanet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax
http://www.trinity-electronics.com
Custom Electronics Design and Manufacturing

2012\02\16@161404 by Fred Langley

flavicon
face
I just upgraded my laptop to a flash memory buffered HD.
Seagate Momentus XT 750GB:
http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/products/laptops/laptop-hdd/


That drive is 750GB, RPM in the 5000's (they don't really say), with 8GB of
high-speed flash memory as a buffer. They claim that since only 8GB is used,
that it is much faster than the memory used in SSD's since they can afford
to use the more expensive memory.
The most commonly used stuff gets stored in the flash buffer, so once you
boot a couple of times and start and stop your most common applications it
is really fast. For instance, starting Outlook was always at least a 3-4
second process. Now it is sub-second. Boot times, although I have not
measured them are probably a quarter of the time.

My desktop PC uses an SSD for the system drive and a pair of mirrored 2TB
drives for data.
I think the laptop is now noticeably faster when it comes to booting and
starting the programs I most use than the SSD based desktop.
{Original Message removed}

2012\02\16@162528 by Herbert Graf

picon face
On Thu, 2012-02-16 at 15:18 -0500, V G wrote:
> > I am not all that familiar with RAIDs but it looks like the goal is to
> > have a zippy OS, fast boot etc but not too concerned about data
> > transfer speeds.
> >
>
> That's correct. I want fast boots. SIGH, I guess I'll go with BIOS fake
> RAID then and keep daily backups on some other mass storage.

If you want a fast boot and app launches, forgo RAID and get a small SSD
as your OS drive, and a large HD for your data/big app drive. You will
get performance that SMOKES the best RAID array you could build.

TTYL

2012\02\16@162710 by V G

picon face
On Thu, Feb 16, 2012 at 4:14 PM, Fred Langley <spamBeGonepiclistspamBeGonespamplatinum.ca> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

I have one of these in my laptop, not really looking for it in my desktop

2012\02\16@162751 by V G

picon face
On Thu, Feb 16, 2012 at 3:52 PM, Dwayne Reid <TakeThisOuTdwaynerEraseMEspamspam_OUTplanet.eon.net> wrote:

>  Just coming in near the end of this thread, but why wouldn't you use
> a solid-state drive for your OS?  From the reports that I've read,
> these things reduce boot time by a full order of magnitude.
>
> Since you are concerned with the OS booting quickly, I'd get the
> smallest SSD that works.  That would be somewhere near 128GB for me
> (OS plus whatever programs need to run at boot time).
>
> You can use conventional hard drives for your other storage needs.
>
>
That's what I do now, but I'm going to put the SSD in RAID 0. Whatever I
get, I'm going to put into RAID 0

2012\02\16@163532 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
I have used RAID 0 in one of my laptop, could not notice too much of speed
increase. I have not got an SSD but now I am only sleeping my laptop, and
when I open the screen I can type my password straight away and work.
Better than any booting technology from any type of storage.

Tamas


On 16 February 2012 21:27, V G <RemoveMEx.solarwind.xspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2012 , 2013 only
- Today
- New search...