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'[OT] Windows 2000 stuffs P16pro burning Software :'
1999\11\21@015053 by Keith Causey

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Hi Matthew, do you find that win2000 is slower than win98 or win95?

> Hi Everyone,
>
> I have just installed Windows 2000 only to fid that it handles DOS based
> apps very poorly. It is very slow. So Slow I can not burn my pics any
more.
> Can someone please point me to or email me some burning software for the
> P16pro that is Windows based.
>
> Thanks
>
> Mathew Cohen

1999\11\21@021000 by Mathew Cohen

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Hi,

Win 2000 is much nicer than win98 or 95. Although the DOS mode is slower.
Everything else seems faster although I am running a 366 celeron overclocked
to 550Mhz and 128 meg of Ram but it still seems faster.
Back to the problem I can not burn my pics any more and I have changed the
timing in the .ini and it still does not work.


Mathew Cohen

{Original Message removed}

1999\11\21@032207 by Mark Willis

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If you have an old machine, it works well to use that machine (under
DOS) to burn PICs;  Perhaps some day they'll fix the Dos timing
situation, this gets you working NOW, though.

I really don't understand why more people don't do this <G>  When I did
testing work at Microsoft, they at least have 2 machines, 1 for running
tests on, 1 for compiling and so forth <G>

(OK, so it looks a little "weird" to do it my way;  I have a machine to
code/compile on, a little tiny 286 (networked) to take notes on &
transfer data or format floppies on, and another reasonably fast machine
to test run software on or burn PICs on, the nice thing is that, if
testing software & you "prang" the OS on the test machine (which tends
to happen often when testing Alpha OS versions), making
FDisk/Format/total re-install necessary, you don't lose ANY source
code;  A small HDD's optional here <G>;  If you need a new driver, you
can use the 286 to get a floppy usable to install it, WHILE still being
productive on the other machines;  And, you can back up the source to
the 286 so if you lose the main compile/edit machine's HDD, no big
deal.  It gets pretty nicely productive...)  YMMV.  (OK, so I use more
machines here - with this many programmers, I have to <G>  Old machines
are cheap!)

 Mark

Mathew Cohen wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

1999\11\21@121251 by Brian Kraut

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I have seen a lot of references to overclocking Pentiums on this list.  How
exactly do you do this?  Is it a crystal change?

Mathew Cohen wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Win 2000 is much nicer than win98 or 95. Although the DOS mode is slower.
> Everything else seems faster although I am running a 366 celeron overclocked
> to 550Mhz and 128 meg of Ram but it still seems faster.
> Back to the problem I can not burn my pics any more and I have changed the
> timing in the .ini and it still does not work.
>
> Mathew Cohen
>
> {Original Message removed}

1999\11\21@121907 by Brian Kraut

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I also agree with using multiple machines.  I do a lot of work with serial
communications so I usually have one old DOS machine to provide serial inputs to
my projects and one to read serial inputs out of it.  One more reason for doing
this is because the Windows terminal program from 95 up automatically adjusts ba
ud
rate when reading serial data.  When I have a serial output from a PIC that is n
ot
at the correct baud rate I don't want to think that everything is working O.K.

Mark Willis wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> > {Original Message removed}

1999\11\21@124852 by Sean Breheny

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Hi Brian,

I have never done it, but I believe the procedure is to just tell your
motherboard (using jumpers or a config utility) to increase the clock rate.
In addition, you usually increse the core voltage slightly (I think)
because CMOS circuits can run a bit faster at higher Vdd (higher Vdd
increases the width of the acceptible high and low regions of the voltage
transfer characteristic, and increases the amount of current which the FETs
conduct, thus charging parasitic capacitances faster).

There are certain motherboards which are more conducive to doing this
because they allow you more independent control of all of the parameters
(clock speed, core voltage, etc.) I think "Abit" is one of the main MB
manufacturers which is popular among overclockers. Possibly AOpen also.

Take a look at:

http://www.anandtech.com

Sean

At 10:42 PM 11/20/99 -0500, you wrote:
>I have seen a lot of references to overclocking Pentiums on this list.  How
>exactly do you do this?  Is it a crystal change?
>

|
| Sean Breheny
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM
| Electrical Engineering Student
\--------------=----------------
Save lives, please look at http://www.all.org
Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
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1999\11\21@152922 by Mark Willis

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With the coming of the "Open Source" movement, I've personally wondered
when some motherboard manufacturer's going to get the lead out & open
source their BIOS code, complete with comments?  That, I'd love, I'd buy
a few of those!  <G>

On overclocking;  The old Celeron 300A's can be run as high as 550 MHz,
sometimes, at 2.0V, on an ABit BX6-2 motherboard.  I've seen some
Celeron 366A's IIRC overclocked, as well.  Other processors can be
overclocked, also.  (I ran one 5x86-133 CPU as a DX4-120 for quite some
time, on an old VLB motherboard that wouldn't run it as a clock
quadrupled CPU;  gave *good* I/O throughput, made for a good Win95 box
at the time!)  eBay usually has quite a few overclocked guaranteed
motherboard/CPU combinations for auction at any given time, you can
always use it as a source of information (See what boards at what speeds
are SELLING like hotcakes will give you a good idea of the popularity of
a given CPU/Motherboard combination;  Not all CPU's will overclock
flawlessly, you do want to test all instructions properly if you
overclock, if things get flakey try lowering the clock rate <G>)

My style's to parallel process, reduces the need for all that speed when
you can do things in parallel, P200MMX and dual CPU P166MMX are my
fastest machines right now, would you believe?  <G>

 Mark

Sean Breheny wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
I do small package shipping for small businesses, world-wide.

1999\11\21@184602 by William Chops Westfield

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   With the coming of the "Open Source" movement, I've personally wondered
   when some motherboard manufacturer's going to get the lead out & open
   source their BIOS code, complete with comments?  That, I'd love, I'd buy
   a few of those!  <G>

IBM published the BIOS for the original IBM PC...

:-)
BillW

1999\11\21@211123 by Mark Willis

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William Chops Westfield wrote:
>
>     With the coming of the "Open Source" movement, I've personally wondered
>     when some motherboard manufacturer's going to get the lead out & open
>     source their BIOS code, complete with comments?  That, I'd love, I'd buy
>     a few of those!  <G>
>
> IBM published the BIOS for the original IBM PC...
>
>  :-)
> BillW

Yeah, but then on the AT, when some people had the "gall" to overclock
it, they re-wrote the BIOS code to *fail* POST, if you'd overclocked;
You had to make a widget that changed the clock frequency after a while,
if you wanted to overclock an AT "B" motherboard.  Ack.  Or patch the
BIOS, alternately.  Have both in print <G>

What I want though, is for ABit to do this, call it "The Linux
Motherboard", and you'd see it sell pretty well <G>

 Mark

--
I do small package shipping for small businesses, world-wide.

1999\11\22@000944 by Agnes en Henk Tobbe

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Brian Kraut wrote >.  When I have a serial output from a PIC that is not
>at the correct baud rate I don't want to think that everything is working
O.K.


Thanks for telling me. I am using the Windows terminal programme (WIN 98) to
communicate with my PIC's.
How far does that adjusting go.... I have noticed that when I am way off the
proper speed I get mistakes and funny characters on the display.
And where does the adjusting take place? In the terminal programme itself or
in the serial driver?
There is also a nice small thing arond called "Terminator" Does that have
the same problem? Would have when the adjusting is donein the driver.... Who
knows exactlay what is going on? I have some more testing to do at various
bps rates and have not (yet) got a DOS machine available for that.
Henk VK2GWK

1999\11\22@194314 by Brian Kraut

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I manufacture a device to send marine electronics NMEA data streems.  I found
out about this while I was testing one after installing Win95.  The unit has DIP
switch settings for 1200-9600 baud.  I spent an hour trying to figure out why
one would seem to transmit at 4800 baud no matter what the DIP switch settings.
I seem to remember that it worked no matter what I set the terminal program for.

It has been a while, but I seem to remember that Procomm running in a DOS window
worked correctly.

Agnes en Henk Tobbe wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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