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'[OT] Windows 2000 install assistance?'
2008\11\14@233609 by PicDude

flavicon
face

I need to install Win2k on a new laptop, but my Win2k disks require a boot
floppy, and the laptop does not have a floppy drive.  Can't find a USB
floppy in stock anywhere locally, and I'd like to get this done this
weekend.  Looking for alternatives...

- I downloaded a third-party boot CD, but got an error on bootup that
NTOSKRNL was missing, and I haven't found another version yet.  Anyone know
how to fix this?

- I have an external USB drive/enclosure, and I can put an older hard-drive
in there with Win2k already on it to boot up, but IIRC, when trying to
install, Win2K will only allow me to install to the hard drive it booted
from -- can anyone verify this?

- If I temporarily installed the new hard-drive into a deskop PC (with a
floppy), I could probably install to the drive then (by disconnecting the
desktop's hard-drive), but will I be able to use the laptop HD in the laptop
afterwards?  Or will the install not have the proper drivers for the laptop,
even for a basic, safe boot?

- If I created a Win2k bootable flash drive (I know it can be done, though
I'd have to research how again), booted with that, then would it let me run
the install from a CD and install to the hard-drive?

- Any other, better, simpler, quicker options?

Thanks,
-Neil




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2008\11\15@000605 by M. Adam Davis

face picon face
Remove the HD from the laptop, and put it into another computer.

>From there you have a few options:
- You can try installing win2k, and hoping that it recognizes it's in
a new computer when you move it back and loads new drivers
- You can make the HD bootable, copy the floppy disk to the root of
the bootable drive, and then copy the win2k cd's i386 folder to i386
on the floppy.  Once booted, make sure smartdrive is loaded and run
setup in i386.

There should be online tutorials on how to install it from a flash drive.

Good luck!

-Adam

On Fri, Nov 14, 2008 at 11:35 PM, PicDude <spam_OUTpicdude2TakeThisOuTspamavn-tech.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\11\15@003312 by Bob Blick

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Hi Neil,

I have seen versions of W2K that boot from the CD. Maybe you have an old
version.

Bittorrent time?

Cheerful regards,

Bob


PicDude wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\11\15@005202 by cdb

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face


:: downloaded a third-party boot CD

I wonder if a VistaPE CD would work?

I have Win2K (on a drive but not attached to anything), but the
install CD only requires floppies if you want to make the rescue boot
environment - I thought Microsoft in their knowledge base had a
bootable ISO for download.

Might this thread be of help?
http://www.winforums.com/showthread.php?t=10730

Colin
--
cdb, .....colinKILLspamspam@spam@btech-online.co.uk on 15/11/2008

Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk  

Hosted by:  http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=7988359






2008\11\15@012906 by apptech

face
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> I need to install Win2k on a new laptop, but my Win2k disks require a boot
> floppy, and the laptop does not have a floppy drive.  Can't find a USB
> floppy in stock anywhere locally, and I'd like to get this done this
> weekend.  Looking for alternatives...

Gujin may or may not help, but knowing about it is liable to usefully bend
your brain along the way.


       http://gujin.sourceforge.net/



           Russell


What is Gujin
Gujin is a PC boot loader which can analyze your partitions and filesystems.
It finds the Linux kernel images available, as well as other bootable
partitions (for *BSD, MS-DOS, Windows, etc.), files (*.kgz) and bootable
disk images (*.bdi), and displays a graphical menu for selecting which
system to boot.
Gujin boots Linux kernel using the documented interface, like LILO and GRUB,
so it doesn't need any other pre-installed bootloader. It can also directly
load gzip'ed ELF32 or ELF64 files, with a simple interface to collect
real-mode BIOS data. There is no need to execute anything after making a new
kernel: just copy the kernel image file into the "/boot" directory, with a
standard name.
Gujin is written almost entirely in C with GCC, and it fully executes in
real mode to be as compatible as possible.

2008\11\15@033635 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Sat, Nov 15, 2008 at 12:35 PM, PicDude <picdude2spamKILLspamavn-tech.com> wrote:
>
> I need to install Win2k on a new laptop, but my Win2k disks require a boot
> floppy, and the laptop does not have a floppy drive.  Can't find a USB
> floppy in stock anywhere locally, and I'd like to get this done this
> weekend.  Looking for alternatives...
>

Does this new laptop comes with Vista or Linux? I would
guess it is a yes. Does the vendor provide Windows 2K driver?
I would guess it is a no.

If my guesses are right, I would suggest using the original OS
which comes with the laptop. I know this is a strange alternative
but I am thinking you will have problems to get Windows 2k
running in the end even if you can find a USB floppy.

Xiaofan

2008\11\15@071431 by PicDude

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face

It's a Thinkpad, which came with Linux (Suse 10) or Vista, and I chose Linux.
I always set these up as dual boot, and I've so far re-created the
partitions and moved Linux to another partition.  I've already setup grub
and can boot into Linux.  Now I have to get Win 2k installed, and I'll
modify grub to boot that too.

I did verify before purchasing, that Lenovo has Win 2K drivers for it.  I
stick with 2k because it's the most stable of the Win OS'es that I've found
to date, and I really don't need any other fancier features for what I use
it for (mostly cad/cnc stuff, mplab, and some tuning tools for my cars'
ECUs).

Cheers,
-Neil.


Xiaofan Chen wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> --

2008\11\15@071735 by PicDude

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It is an older version.  I borrowed a bootable version too, but it was
scratched and coming up with errors.  I would buy fresh media CD's if I
could find it, but I really don't feel like paying MS for another license,
when I already have one.



Bob Blick-4 wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> --

2008\11\15@073639 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Sat, Nov 15, 2008 at 8:14 PM, PicDude <EraseMEpicdude2spam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTavn-tech.com> wrote:
>
> It's a Thinkpad, which came with Linux (Suse 10) or Vista, and I chose Linux.
> I always set these up as dual boot, and I've so far re-created the
> partitions and moved Linux to another partition.  I've already setup grub
> and can boot into Linux.  Now I have to get Win 2k installed, and I'll
> modify grub to boot that too.
>
> I did verify before purchasing, that Lenovo has Win 2K drivers for it.  I
> stick with 2k because it's the most stable of the Win OS'es that I've found
> to date, and I really don't need any other fancier features for what I use
> it for (mostly cad/cnc stuff, mplab, and some tuning tools for my cars'
> ECUs).
>

If you are sure Lenovo provides all the necessary Windows 2k
drivers, you should be able to contact them for support.

Personally I do not like Windows 2k because of the
long startup time especially in the corporate networking
environment. XP is much better in this aspect. It has also
quite some buggy implementation of USB and Microsoft
no longer supports it.

Xiaofan

2008\11\15@073833 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Sat, Nov 15, 2008 at 8:17 PM, PicDude <picdude2spamspam_OUTavn-tech.com> wrote:
>
> It is an older version.  I borrowed a bootable version too, but it was
> scratched and coming up with errors.  I would buy fresh media CD's if I
> could find it, but I really don't feel like paying MS for another license,
> when I already have one.
>

You can try to slipstream SP4 for your Windows 2k. You
need another Windows PC though.
http://www.petri.co.il/windows_2000_xp_sp_slipstreaming.htm

Xiaofan

2008\11\15@112204 by PicDude

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face

They won't provide support for installing Windows, since I did not get
Windows from them.  Possibly for installation of specific drivers later, but
not to figure out how to get a bootable CD.  They'll probably just tell me
to buy a bootable version.

But let me ask this... I toyed with XP when it was first released, as a
couple friends were having problems and I'm usually their repair/install
person.  I can't remember the details, but I found it buggy and never moved
away from 2000 because of those experiences.  And I really didn't need
anything else anyway.  All I ask for is reliability/stability, and good
performance.  Do you know that XP with any of the later service packs is
less buggy then Win 2k?  If so, I wouldn't mind purchasing a copy.  The
faster boot time you indicated is a plus, since I jump back and forth
between Linux and Win periodically.  But I've not had any USB issues with
2k.

Cheers,
-Neil.





Xiaofan Chen wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> --

2008\11\15@114357 by Xiaofan Chen

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On Sun, Nov 16, 2008 at 12:21 AM, PicDude <@spam@picdude2KILLspamspamavn-tech.com> wrote:
>
> But let me ask this... I toyed with XP when it was first released, as a
> couple friends were having problems and I'm usually their repair/install
> person.  I can't remember the details, but I found it buggy and never moved
> away from 2000 because of those experiences.  And I really didn't need
> anything else anyway.  All I ask for is reliability/stability, and good
> performance.  Do you know that XP with any of the later service packs is
> less buggy then Win 2k?  If so, I wouldn't mind purchasing a copy.  The
> faster boot time you indicated is a plus, since I jump back and forth
> between Linux and Win periodically.  But I've not had any USB issues with
> 2k.
>

The original version of XP is not that good. SP1 is better.
Windows XP SP2/SP3 are the best Windows IMHO. For laptops
Windows XP also offers better power management for the users.
It is also more secured than 2k as Microsoft still provides hot fixes
for XP.

Xiaofan

2008\11\15@115332 by Xiaofan Chen

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On Sun, Nov 16, 2008 at 12:21 AM, PicDude <KILLspampicdude2KILLspamspamavn-tech.com> wrote:
> The faster boot time you indicated is a plus, since I jump back and forth
> between Linux and Win periodically.

If that is the case, you can use Linux as your primary OS and install
your 2k as the guest OS under Vmware or other VMs. VMware
and Windows XP (maybe 2k as well) combination is said to work
fine with MPLAB and ICD 2, PICkit 2 and Real ICE.

Xiaofan

2008\11\15@115540 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Sun, Nov 16, 2008 at 12:53 AM, Xiaofan Chen <RemoveMExiaofancTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
> On Sun, Nov 16, 2008 at 12:21 AM, PicDude <spamBeGonepicdude2spamBeGonespamavn-tech.com> wrote:
>> The faster boot time you indicated is a plus, since I jump back and forth
>> between Linux and Win periodically.
>
> If that is the case, you can use Linux as your primary OS and install
> your 2k as the guest OS under Vmware or other VMs. VMware
> and Windows XP (maybe 2k as well) combination is said to work
> fine with MPLAB and ICD 2, PICkit 2 and Real ICE.

Moreover, you will have no issues with the bootable CD and driver
issues any more as you are running Windows 2K under the VM.
Since you have a new laptop, performance should not be an issue
(as long as you have adequate RAM).

But personally I do not use VM. I am using dual boot (Windows
Vista, Ubuntu 8.04 and Ubuntu 8.10).

Xiaofan

2008\11\15@150321 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Nov 15, 2008, at 8:21 AM, PicDude wrote:

> Do you know that XP with any of the later service packs is less  
> buggy then Win 2k?

I've had both W2K and XP on the "work provided" machines, and much  
preferred XP.  We did wait long enough on XP that we missed any of the  
pre-SP excitement, so I can't directly compare "original XP" with  
"recent XP"

(Of course, for me the lack of good (any?) USB support in W2k was a  
real PITA.)

BillW

2008\11\15@164740 by Josh Koffman

face picon face
On Sat, Nov 15, 2008 at 11:21 AM, PicDude <TakeThisOuTpicdude2EraseMEspamspam_OUTavn-tech.com> wrote:
<snip>
> anything else anyway.  All I ask for is reliability/stability, and good
> performance.  Do you know that XP with any of the later service packs is
> less buggy then Win 2k?  If so, I wouldn't mind purchasing a copy.  The
> faster boot time you indicated is a plus, since I jump back and forth
> between Linux and Win periodically.  But I've not had any USB issues with
> 2k.

While XP probably is a bit faster, my understanding (and I can't
remember where I read this) was that Microsoft cheated a bit to make
it seem faster. Win2K does a bunch of stuff on bootup before it will
let you log in. XP moved those processes until after the login. The
end result is that you get to log in faster but that the computer
chugs for a little while after you do.

As I said, I'm not sure how accurate this is, and I've never done side
by side comparisons on two equally spec'ed machines, but XP does seem
to keep itself busy for a little while after login.

Josh
--
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
       -Douglas Adams

2008\11\15@195303 by Bob Ammerman

picon face
> The original version of XP is not that good. SP1 is better.
> Windows XP SP2/SP3 are the best Windows IMHO. For laptops
> Windows XP also offers better power management for the users.
> It is also more secured than 2k as Microsoft still provides hot fixes
> for XP.
>
> Xiaofan

I second that, especially regarding laptop support and security.

-- Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems

2008\11\17@101850 by PicDude

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face

Okay, I got it installed, after jumping through some hoops -- I polished the
CD (with toothpaste, as seems to be a popular suggestion on the net), and
this let my bootable CD get a a bit further -- enough to where I could hit
F6 for third-party driver install, and it would pause earlier.  At that
pause, I swapped in the other CD and it let it continue from there.  Due to
other scratches I had to swap CD's a couple more times, but it got done.
Definitely a painful process.

HOWEVER, I am fascinated by Xiaofan's comments re: Vmware.  The last time I
played with that was around 1999, and I remember having problems with the
virtual OS connecting to the hardware ports.  Also had problems transferring
files between the OSes.  But in those days I was experimenting for fun and
didn't pursue it too much.  I've got decent performance now (2GHz, 1GB ram)
so I think I'll investigate this again.

Also, I think I'll move to XP -- I researched a bit after your comments and
it seems stable enough now.  Apparently they're up to SP3 now.  My Win2k
boot time is quite decent so that's not an issue, but updating to something
more common will get me less compatibility issues as apps are upgraded.  And
I'd probably get better support from a friend who does system and network
installs for a living....  Everytime I ask for Win2k help, he first points
out that it's obsolete and can't help, but I get even when he asks for help
with a car problem -- he really should upgrade to the 2009 model before I
can assist :)

BTW, someone mentioned USB issues with Win2k.  I've never had any USB
issues, though I can't say for sure that I'm getting the best performance
from high-speed devices.

Cheers,
-Neil.




Bob Ammerman wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> --

2008\11\17@113143 by Gordon Williams

picon face
I just replaced my mobo on my computer and reinstalled W2k on it.  It is
working fine and I haven't had any software or hardware compatibitly
problems.  All the divers are available for the my new hardware and the dual
core works fine.

The main reason that I replaced the mobo (AMD 950 Mhz) was that the fans
were getting *very* noisy rather than performance issues.  I'm down from 5
fans to 3 fans and it is much better.  The new one (Intel e5200) is a bit
more snappy, but the processor utilization hardly gets above 0%.  W2k
dosen't hog resources like XP or even worse Vista.

I'll be keeping W2k for as long as possible.

Regards,

Gordon Williams

{Original Message removed}

2008\11\17@183525 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Tue, Nov 18, 2008 at 12:31 AM, Gordon Williams <RemoveMEg_willspamTakeThisOuTcyberus.ca> wrote:
> I just replaced my mobo on my computer and reinstalled W2k on it.  It is
> working fine and I haven't had any software or hardware compatibitly
> problems.  All the divers are available for the my new hardware and the dual
> core works fine.
>
> I'll be keeping W2k for as long as possible.

Desktop is in general less problematic when it comes to driver.
Laptop is the main problem. It took me more than three days
to install Windows XP for a HP Compaq notebook since the
vendor only provides Vista driver.

Reference:
http://mcuee.blogspot.com/2008/09/install-xp-on-hp-compaq-presario.html

Just google "notebook xp driver needed" and you will know
how many people are trying to do that.

Xiaofan

2008\11\18@001551 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Mon, Nov 17, 2008 at 11:18 PM, PicDude <picdude2EraseMEspam.....avn-tech.com> wrote:
> HOWEVER, I am fascinated by Xiaofan's comments re: Vmware.  The last time I
> played with that was around 1999, and I remember having problems with the
> virtual OS connecting to the hardware ports.  Also had problems transferring
> files between the OSes.  But in those days I was experimenting for fun and
> didn't pursue it too much.  I've got decent performance now (2GHz, 1GB ram)
> so I think I'll investigate this again.

I myself do not use Vmware since I am happy with dual boot. But you may
want to upgrade the RAM to 2GB. It is cheap now. For VMware,
you really want to have more RAMs. BTW, Vista would need 2GB RAM
to run. XP is happy with 512MB though but 1GB for XP is nice. Modern
Linux (with fancy GUI and Firefox) need a lot of RAM as well. So if
you are using VMWare, 1GB is just bare minimum, 2GB would be
much better.


Xiaofan

2008\11\18@005610 by John Chung

picon face
I use VMWARE with 1GB RAM. Ain't enuf. A lot of disc trashing. Very apparent with run Windows images.

John


--- On Tue, 11/18/08, Xiaofan Chen <EraseMExiaofancspamgmail.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> --

2008\11\18@005655 by jmg

flavicon
face
> Desktop is in general less problematic when it comes to driver.
> Laptop is the main problem. It took me more than three days
> to install Windows XP for a HP Compaq notebook since the
> vendor only provides Vista driver.

If it is a Compaq branded laptop, just go to your dealer and ask for the
downgrade option to Windows XP. It comes with all needed drivers for XP.
Or just go to hp.com -> Download drivers and software. Everything is there
for W2K, XP, XP64, ...

Best Jens

2008\11\18@024346 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Tue, Nov 18, 2008 at 1:51 PM, jmg <EraseMEpiclistspamspamspamBeGonetechnetz.de> wrote:
>
> If it is a Compaq branded laptop, it comes with all needed drivers for XP.
> Or just go to hp.com -> Download drivers and software. Everything is there
> for W2K, XP, XP64, ...
>

Been there, done that, and no drivers for W2K, XP, XP64.
Just point me where is the XP driver for the Compaq Presario
V3619AU.

The driver page is here:
h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/softwareCategory?lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&lang=en&product=3554119&
Looks nice, right? When you click into XP (or Win2k or XP64), you
will find the reality.

Xiaofan

2008\11\18@103256 by Gordon Williams

picon face
part 1 2406 bytes content-type:multipart/related; type="text/plain"; (decoded 7bit)

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_000A_01C94969.0ACDE830
Content-Type: text/plain;
       charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Just out of curiosity I did click on your link and sellected W2k.  It
allowed me to download
sp37799.exe, (1/1 , 7.4M)

     Released:   2007-11-12
     Version:   1.00 C
     Compatibility:   Microsoft Windows 2000 Pro, Microsoft Windows Vista,
Microsoft Windows Vista Business (64-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate
(64-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista (64-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate
(32-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium (64-bit), Microsoft Windows
Vista Home Basic (64-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista Enterprise (32-bit),
Microsoft Windows Vista Business (32-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista
Enterprise (64-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista Home Basic (32-bit), Microsoft
Windows Vista Home Premium (32-bit)
     Description:   This package provides the HP QuickTouch Software for
the supported notebook models and operating systems.

     The HP QuickTouch Software provides on-screen visuals and associated
sounds that are displayed and heard when adjusting the notebook volume.

     PURPOSE: Recommended
     Enhancements:   Adds an Audio Equalizer (EQ) adjustment for HP
Pavilion HDX Series Notebooks.



Is that what you were looking for?

Regards,

Gordon Williams
{Original Message removed}

2008\11\18@121031 by peter green

flavicon
face
Gordon Williams wrote:
> Just out of curiosity I did click on your link and sellected W2k..............................
That doesn't look like drivers to me, it looks like some little utiltiy
that is nice to have but not really nessacery

Look at the links for vista (32 bit and 64 bit) and compare them to the
links for everything else. The links for vista have all the drivers you
need by the looks of things as well as quite a few other bits and peices
that you don't really need. The pages for all the other operating
systems have a few bits and peices but none of the important drivers.


2008\11\18@154437 by Martin

face
flavicon
face
PicDude wrote:
> They won't provide support for installing Windows, since I did not get
> Windows from them.  Possibly for installation of specific drivers later, but
> not to figure out how to get a bootable CD.  They'll probably just tell me
> to buy a bootable version.
>
> But let me ask this... I toyed with XP when it was first released, as a
> couple friends were having problems and I'm usually their repair/install
> person.  I can't remember the details, but I found it buggy and never moved
> away from 2000 because of those experiences.  And I really didn't need
> anything else anyway.  All I ask for is reliability/stability, and good
> performance.  Do you know that XP with any of the later service packs is
> less buggy then Win 2k?  If so, I wouldn't mind purchasing a copy.  The
> faster boot time you indicated is a plus, since I jump back and forth
> between Linux and Win periodically.  But I've not had any USB issues with
> 2k.
>
> Cheers,
> -Neil.

I've used both Win2k and XP. I use XP almost every day, all day. It
rarely if ever crashes. I use MPLAB, firefox, thunderbird, winamp,
acrobat, MS word, etc. concurrently. The later service packs are a
distinct improvement over XP SP0 by almost anyone's standards.
-
Martin

2008\11\18@183211 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Tue, Nov 18, 2008 at 11:33 PM, Gordon Williams <RemoveMEg_willKILLspamspamcyberus.ca> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

No. The major things are missing (graphics, chipsets, sound, etc).

Xiaofan

2008\11\18@204053 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Wed, Nov 19, 2008 at 7:32 AM, Xiaofan Chen <xiaofancSTOPspamspamspam_OUTgmail.com> wrote:
> On Tue, Nov 18, 2008 at 11:33 PM, Gordon Williams <spamBeGoneg_willSTOPspamspamEraseMEcyberus.ca> wrote:
>> Just out of curiosity I did click on your link and sellected W2k.  It
>> allowed me to download
>> sp37799.exe, (1/1 , 7.4M)
>>
>> Is that what you were looking for?
>>
> No. The major things are missing (graphics, chipsets, sound, etc).
>

This blog post have links to various sites and people's struggle
to get XP installed on HP/Compaq laptops because HP does
not provide XP drivers for the graphics card, the chipsets and
the sound card.
http://mcuee.blogspot.com/2008/09/install-xp-on-hp-compaq-presario.html

Xiaofan

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