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'[OT] Which EEPROM with 12C509?'
1999\05\12@233715 by James Cameron

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Want a recommendation for a serial EEPROM or other non-volatile memory
in the 256k to 4Mb range to which a 12C509 may speak.

Constraints:
       - eight pin dip,
       - 5v supply,
       - small quantities (10-50).

For an antique computer, an 80C85 based Tandy 100/102/200 laptop, I have
volunteered to a group of users on the 'net to investigate the
construction of a simple device to act as offline storage.

I had envisaged a 12C509 talking to a serial EEPROM.

The interface to the laptop would be via the RS-232-like serial port,
which I can program under software control to all sorts of baud rates.
An 81C55 timer is used as the baud rate source.

Ideally I'd want to fit the two chips into a DB25 backshell; though they
are getting small nowadays, these backshells.

I expect to run the device from power available from the DB25 socket,
i.e. parasitic with "shocking" diodes, now that I understand why.  ;-)

--
James Cameron                                      (spam_OUTquozlTakeThisOuTspamus.netrek.org)

Linux, Firewalls, OpenVMS, Software Engineering, CGI, HTTP, X, C, FORTH,
COBOL, BASIC, DCL, csh, bash, ksh, sh, Electronics, Microcontrollers,
Disability Engineering, Netrek, Bicycles, Pedant, Farming, Home Control,
Remote Area Power, Greek Scholar, Tenor Vocalist, Church Sound, Husband.

"Specialisation is for insects." -- Robert Heinlein.

1999\05\13@022002 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
   Want a recommendation for a serial EEPROM or other non-volatile memory
   in the 256k to 4Mb range to which a 12C509 may speak.

   Constraints:
           - eight pin dip,
           - 5v supply,
           - small quantities (10-50).

   For an antique computer, an 80C85 based Tandy 100/102/200 laptop, I have
   volunteered to a group of users on the 'net to investigate the
   construction of a simple device to act as offline storage.

Man, that's scary.  In two chips you can implement more storage than the
old 5.25 inch floppy drives.  (maybe you can make a commodore 64 or
atari version as well.  IIRC the floppies for those systems used an
rs232-like port.)

I don't think you can find serial EEPROM or flash that dense in that
sized package - the chips themselves get too big, do you get 28 pin TSOP
style packages with only a few pins connected (they should fit into an
rs232 clamshell OK, though.)  Check into the atmel "serial dataflash"
parts.  If you use a crystal on a slightly larger PIC (16C505?), you
shouldn't need a separate baud rate generator.

BillW

1999\05\13@060743 by paulb

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William Chops Westfield wrote:

> maybe you can make a commodore 64 or atari version as well.  IIRC the
> floppies for those systems used an rs232-like port.

 I thought it was much closer to IÓC?
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\05\13@065633 by wwl

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On Thu, 13 May 1999 03:25:54 +0000, you wrote:

{Quote hidden}

You might consider using a larger PIC to control an external
battery-backed parallel SRAM, or flash device - probably no more
expensive, rather larger but should fit a D25 'dongle' box.

1999\05\13@073048 by Russell McMahon

picon face
I think you should consider using a floppy drive because -

1.    Cheap initially
2.    Media cheap and swappable easily.
3.    Swapped out media may be sent to other people and taken offsite
for backup security.
4.    Once you've done it successfully you can show me how you did it
so that I don't have to do the work :-)

The priority which these come in is not necessarily numerical :_)

Seriously though - apart from the "power it from the DB25 socket" a
floppy may be a good idea.
Can't be *too* hard although the PICs limited memory may be a
challenge. Long long lo... ago I wrote (actually, modified) a floppy
disk controller using a 1771 AFAIR connected to a 6802. A modern
all-in-1-chip controller (and possibly a FIFO?) may be all it takes.

Then of course there's an IDE drive - I understand (BIMBW *) that you
can write to  these as slow as you like with internal buffer looking
after write speed considerations.


I've oft thought that an RS232 serial connected floppy could be a
very useful device, even in these Flash capable days. Once 2MB Flash
plug in modules get down to $NZ4.50 for a box of 10 the attraction of
the floppy may pale.


Russell McMahon

* - But,IMayBeWrong!.

From: James Cameron <.....quozlKILLspamspam@spam@US.NETREK.ORG>

>Want a recommendation for a serial EEPROM or other non-volatile
memory
>in the 256k to 4Mb range to which a 12C509 may speak.
>For an antique computer, an 80C85 based Tandy 100/102/200 laptop, I
have
>volunteered to a group of users on the 'net to investigate the
>construction of a simple device to act as offline storage.
>
>I had envisaged a 12C509 talking to a serial EEPROM.
>
>The interface to the laptop would be via the RS-232-like serial
port,
>which I can program under software control to all sorts of baud
rates.
>An 81C55 timer is used as the baud rate source.
>
>Ideally I'd want to fit the two chips into a DB25 backshell; though
they
>are getting small nowadays, these backshells.
>
>I expect to run the device from power available from the DB25
socket,
>i.e. parasitic with "shocking" diodes, now that I understand why.
;-)

1999\05\13@152956 by Harold Hallikainen

picon face
       I'd say the Commodore serial bus is more like a serialized
IEEE488 bus.  By the way, if anyone wants to mess with it, I can send
some 6800 assembly code that talks to the Commodore bus.  I have code to
do a directory, save a binary file, load a binary file, or send a
"command string" to the drive.

Harold



Harold Hallikainen
haroldspamKILLspamhallikainen.com
Hallikainen & Friends, Inc.
See the FCC Rules at http://hallikainen.com/FccRules and comments filed
in LPFM proceeding at http://hallikainen.com/lpfm

On Thu, 13 May 1999 20:04:36 +1000 "Paul B. Webster VK2BZC"
<.....paulbKILLspamspam.....midcoast.com.au> writes:
{Quote hidden}

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1999\05\13@163846 by Fredric White

picon face
ST makes a 256Kbit I2C eeprom in an 8DIP or 8SOIC (M24256).  Not cheap
though.  Mouser sells it for about $8:
http://www.mouser.com/detail.cfm?MPart=511-M24256

As someone else mentioned, there's also Atmel Dataflash.  Insight
sells the 4Mbit AT45D041-RC in 28SOIC for $5.34:
www.insight-electronics.com/cgi-bin/catalog.cgi?supplier=ATL&keywords=at4
5d041

Fredric

1999\05\13@164054 by hmiller

picon face
Harold Hallikainen wrote:
>
>         I'd say the Commodore serial bus is more like a serialized
> IEEE488 bus.  By the way, if anyone wants to mess with it, I can send
> some 6800 assembly code that talks to the Commodore bus.  I have code to
> do a directory, save a binary file, load a binary file, or send a
> "command string" to the drive.
>
> Harold
>
> Harold Hallikainen
> EraseMEharoldspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuThallikainen.com
> Hallikainen & Friends, Inc.
======================

Harold

I'm still messing around with a Commodore64, and would be interested in
your 6800 codes. A few months ago I was given two Heath Microprocessor
Trainer sets based on the 6800.

Harley L. Miller     hmillerspamspam_OUTsound.net

1999\05\13@174352 by ryan pogge

picon face
anyone have code to interface one of these buggers?


> As someone else mentioned, there's also Atmel Dataflash.  Insight
> sells the 4Mbit AT45D041-RC in 28SOIC for $5.34:
>
www.insight-electronics.com/cgi-bin/catalog.cgi?supplier=ATL&ke
ywords=at45d041
>
> Fredric
>

1999\05\14@234821 by Leo TImmer

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face
Why don't you try one of the PlayStation memory cards. They are ranging
from 1MB/15 blocks till several MB's/740 blocks. I want to use it for my
old 8 inch and trs80 with cpm. I think that pricing is interesting because
there is such a big market. My only problem at this time is that i don't
know anything about the chip. I bought a 1MB/15 blocks (i suppose that they
are 16 blocks, but use one for the directory). This card has a 64plcc chip
from Sony type is: CXD8732Q or maybe 5D61 8BML. Looked on the sony site but
couldn't find it, not even at the obsolete parts list. The size of the pcb
is 3.5 cm wide and 4.5cm long and maybe 3 mm thick. So if some one know
where to get info about the chip, or other chips used in these memory
cards, could be interesting for a lot of people on the list.
I' ve seen prices as low as $4 for the 1MB cards. Atmel has an serial 8Mb
5v only serial flash the AT45D081 and a 16Mb serial flash the AT45D161. You
can obtain a pdf at the atmel site. Spi compatible at 15Mhz max clock.
Try http://www.atmel.com/
Leo Timmer
<@spam@salsaterKILLspamspamdds.nl>



----------
> From: William Chops Westfield <KILLspambillwKILLspamspamCISCO.COM>
> To: RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OT] Which EEPROM with 12C509?
> Date: Thursday, May 13, 1999 8:18 AM
>
>     Want a recommendation for a serial EEPROM or other non-volatile
memory
>     in the 256k to 4Mb range to which a 12C509 may speak.
>
>     Constraints:
>             - eight pin dip,
>             - 5v supply,
>             - small quantities (10-50).
>
>     For an antique computer, an 80C85 based Tandy 100/102/200 laptop, I
have
{Quote hidden}

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