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'[OT] What is name of device to make RJ12 cables?'
2005\11\22@102402 by Bill Kuncicky

picon face
I know this is a very elementary question, and one that I should know
the answer to.  But I don't know, and hope that someone will give me an
answer.

I need to make some short little cables that have a plug on either end
to plug into RJ12 sockets.  What I need is some sort of crimping tool to
fasten the connectors to the cables, but cannot find it in any of the
catalogs that I am looking at.  What is that tool called?  And where
could I order one?  What I would really like is a kit that has the tool,
connectors, and the correct cable, if such a kit exists.

Thanks,
Bill

2005\11\22@110354 by olin piclist

face picon face
Bill Kuncicky wrote:
> I need to make some short little cables that have a plug on either end
> to plug into RJ12 sockets.  What I need is some sort of crimping tool to
> fasten the connectors to the cables, but cannot find it in any of the
> catalogs that I am looking at.  What is that tool called?  And where
> could I order one?  What I would really like is a kit that has the tool,
> connectors, and the correct cable, if such a kit exists.

The best place to buy that sort of stuff in the US is Jameco
(http://www.jameco.com).  Jameco 79273 is the plug, and they have a whole
assortment of crimping tools.  Look for 114526 then go to the catalog page
and you can see them all.  These plugs are designed to work with the
standard flat phone wire.  Jameco probably sells that too, but I don't have
the number handy.  You should also be able to get a few feet of it at a
local electronics store.  Just make sure it's the 6 conductor variety.

You'll probably gag on the price of the crimping tool.  If you know what
you're doing and are careful, you can achieve the same thing with a thin
screw driver and a vice or pair of plyers.  There are two parts to crimping
the cable onto a plug, and the tool handles both of them for you.  One part
causes a piece of the plastic to come hold wedge the cable into the plug by
its outer insulation.  the other part is the 6 individual conductors slide
up, slice thru the insulation on the ends of the wires, and make contact
with the conductor within.  These can be slid into place with a thin
srewdriver if you're very careful.


******************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, (978) 742-9014.  #1 PIC
consultant in 2004 program year.  http://www.embedinc.com/products

2005\11\22@111252 by Mark Scoville

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face
Hi Bill,

I have always called this a modular plug crimper. I have one like this
one...

http://www.gilchrist-electric.com/rj45_crimper.html

I *think* I bought mine from Home Depot IIRC. If you keep looking you can
probably find a kit with wire, connectors & crimper. You may have better
luck in your searches if you include the word "modular".

-- Mark

> {Original Message removed}

2005\11\22@120430 by Dwayne Reid

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face
At 08:23 AM 11/22/2005, Bill Kuncicky wrote:
>I know this is a very elementary question, and one that I should
>know the answer to.  But I don't know, and hope that someone will
>give me an answer.
>
>I need to make some short little cables that have a plug on either
>end to plug into RJ12 sockets.  What I need is some sort of crimping
>tool to fasten the connectors to the cables, but cannot find it in
>any of the catalogs that I am looking at.  What is that tool
>called?  And where could I order one?  What I would really like is a
>kit that has the tool, connectors, and the correct cable, if such a kit exists.

They go by various names, but "telephone cable crimp tool" should get
you close.

Be careful when you purchase the connectors: there are 4 variants for
each size: round or flat cable, stranded or solid conductors.  I have
not had good results with any connector that claims to work with both
stranded & solid conductors.

I'm *very* partial to the AMP series of tools and connectors - very
pricey but I've never had a connector fail in years of service.

I have indeed had a lot of grief with the cheap import tools - there
are some good buys out there but you have to take a very close look
at the crimp quality.  Both under-crimping and over-crimping are
common faults that will cause failure at some later date.

The Amp tool I use (body only, no die set) is AMP/Tyco 2-231652-0

Some of the available die sets are:

853400-1   8 Position RJ-45 (standard)(Black)
853400-0   8 Position RJ-45 (high performance) (White)
853400-2   6 Position RJ-12 Line (Blue)
853400-3   4 Position RJ-22 Handset (Green)
853400-4   2-4 Position RJ-11 Line (Lt Grn)
853400-6   6 Position Offset RJ-12 (dec connect) (Orange)
853400-7   6 Position Long Body (Violet)

Some good deals can be had on eBay.

When it comes to picking out connectors, be careful.  You could
purchase genuine Amp connectors - pricey but worth it if you are
installing connectors that go into professional equipment or in a
location that is hard to access.

I often purchase relatively no-name connectors.  The cheap connectors
found as Radio Shack or other consumer outlets are often plated with
only 5 micron gold flash.  Better connectors have 15u plating,
Telecom or Industrial grade uses 50u plating.  Check with the
supplier!  5u gold plating is NOT acceptable for long term use!

Take a close look at the pin shape that pierces the conductors.  A
flat pin (no side-to-side displacement) with two rounded points is
intended for stranded conductors.  A pin that has two slight cuts
with the center portion displaced from the front and rear edges is
intended for solid conductors.

A pin that has a single slight cut with the front edge slightly
displaced from the rear should not be used.  This is most likely one
of those so-called "universal" connectors and I have NOT had good
long-term results with them.

Hope this helps!

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <spam_OUTdwaynerTakeThisOuTspamplanet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
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2005\11\22@125851 by Loper, Chris

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Sorry if this is late - its called a modular jack crimping tool.
I've had good luck with http://www.cyberguys.com, but have seen them cheaper
somewhere.
Don't spend too much unless you have hundreds of crimps to make.
I've used several cheap ones and they work fine.
You can even get one that's made of plastic.

2005\11\22@164250 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> I need to make some short little cables that have a plug on
> either end
> to plug into RJ12 sockets.  What I need is some sort of
> crimping tool to
> fasten the connectors to the cables, but cannot find it in any of the
> catalogs that I am looking at.  What is that tool called?  And where
> could I order one?  What I would really like is a kit that
> has the tool,
> connectors, and the correct cable, if such a kit exists.

Look under 'telephone stuff'?

In my country almost every more or less electronics or computers related
shop has these things, and the plastic versions are pretty cheap too.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2005\11\22@193945 by Steph Smith

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face
the beastie in question is called a 'modular connector crimp\strip\cut
tool',and should be available from anyone who stocks network cable
components.computer fairs are a good source.
{Original Message removed}

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