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'[OT] UK Schematic Markings'
1999\07\03@181734 by John Hansen

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Hi:

       I'm trying to decipher a resistor value on a schematic that I believe is
of UK origin.  The value is 10R.   I'm pretty sure this doesn't mean 10K
because there are some other 10K values on the schematic.  My guess is that
is 10 ohms.  Can anyone confirm this?

John Hansen

1999\07\03@183557 by Les

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Hello John
                   10R means 10ohms here in he UK, so does R10


                               Regards
                                           Les

1999\07\03@183605 by Mark Willis

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Definitely 10 ohms.  That's the Euro/new method.  If it were 12.5k it'd
be put 12k5, if it were 17.3M it'd be 17M3.  Clear once you get used to
it <G>

John Hansen wrote:
>
> Hi:
>
>         I'm trying to decipher a resistor value on a schematic that I believe
is
> of UK origin.  The value is 10R.   I'm pretty sure this doesn't mean 10K
> because there are some other 10K values on the schematic.  My guess is that
> is 10 ohms.  Can anyone confirm this?
>
> John Hansen

1999\07\03@203231 by Ian Cull

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> Hello John
>                      10R means 10ohms here in he UK, so does R10
>
>
>                                  Regards
>                                              Les
>
I agree that "10R" means 10ohms.
But "R10" is a particular resistor on my schematic - it does not tell me its
value!

Ian C.

1999\07\04@070451 by paulb

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Les wrote:

>   10R means 10ohms here in he UK, so does R10

 Umm, sorry, no it *doesn't* at all!  R10 could either mean, as was
mentioned, resistor number 10, *or* ten centiohms.  Well, actually, 0.10
ohms, though 0R10 is generally considered more proper.

 Many things, *never* ten ohms.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\07\04@080542 by Steve Thackery

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Paul B wrote:

>   Umm, sorry, no it *doesn't* at all!  R10 could either mean, as was
> mentioned, resistor number 10, *or* ten centiohms.  Well, actually, 0.10
> ohms, though 0R10 is generally considered more proper.
>
>   Many things, *never* ten ohms.

Yup, gotta agree.  10R is 10 ohms.  R10 is the "tenth" resistor in your
circuit diagram.  0R10 is a 0.1 ohm resistor.

Steve Thackery
Suffolk, England.
Web Site: http://www.btinternet.com/~stevethack/

1999\07\04@082906 by Nigel Goodwin

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In message <spam_OUT1239d0b7.24b0053dTakeThisOuTspamaol.com>, Ian Cull <.....TrionicIanKILLspamspam@spam@AOL.COM>
writes
>> Hello John
>>                      10R means 10ohms here in he UK, so does R10
>>
>>
>>                                  Regards
>>                                              Les
>>
>I agree that "10R" means 10ohms.
>But "R10" is a particular resistor on my schematic - it does not tell me its
>value!

If the value was R10 (as opposed to the circuit reference), it would be
0.1 ohms. Talking of low value resistors, does anyone know when silver
and gold were added as multipliers as well as tolerance bands?. They
only seem to have started being used in the last few years, and were
never mentioned when I was at college or in any colour code tables I
ever saw?.
--

Nigel.

       /--------------------------------------------------------------\
       | Nigel Goodwin   | Internet : nigelgspamKILLspamlpilsley.demon.co.uk     |
       | Lower Pilsley   | Web Page : http://www.lpilsley.demon.co.uk |
       | Chesterfield    | Official site for Shin Ki and New Spirit   |
       | England         |                 Ju Jitsu                   |
       \--------------------------------------------------------------/

1999\07\04@093837 by mkinga

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Your assumption is correct, 10R is 10ohms Other ways of writing resistor
values are :-

1R5 = 1.5 ohms
10K5 = 10.5 Kohms
1M5 = 1.5 Meg ohms
and so on.

1999\07\04@151541 by Mark Willis

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Nigel Goodwin wrote:
> <snipped>
> 0.1 ohms. Talking of low value resistors, does anyone know when silver
> and gold were added as multipliers as well as tolerance bands?. They
> only seem to have started being used in the last few years, and were
> never mentioned when I was at college or in any colour code tables I
> ever saw?.
> --
>
> Nigel.

 I could swear I remember them back as early as the late 70's or early
80's, but I cannot document that.

 Mark

1999\07\04@153625 by Dave VanHorn

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> > 0.1 ohms. Talking of low value resistors, does anyone know when silver
> > and gold were added as multipliers as well as tolerance bands?. They
> > only seem to have started being used in the last few years, and were
> > never mentioned when I was at college or in any colour code tables I
> > ever saw?.

Definitely in place when I learned them first, in around '69

1999\07\04@163656 by Jeff Barlow

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I think I saw them first in about '63. They're clearly not new.

-----Original Message-----

> > anyone know when silver
> > and gold were added as multipliers as well as tolerance bands?. They
> > only seem to have started being used in the last few years, and were
> > never mentioned when I was at college or in any colour code tables I
> > ever saw?.

Definitely in place when I learned them first, in around '69

1999\07\04@183305 by paulb

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Mark Willis wrote:

>  I could swear I remember them back as early as the late 70's or early
> 80's, but I cannot document that.

 Well, of course, values less than ten ohms were neither here nor there
before low-impedance transistor technology, except where wire-wound. ;-)
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\07\04@194717 by Jim Paul

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All,

AFAIK, Gold and Silver bands were used to indicate both a multiplier value
Gold being .01
and Silver being .1.  As a tolerence band, Gold is 5% and Silver is 10%.
And also AFAIK,
this has been the case at least since the fifties, and I believe that is
goes back to at least the
late 30's, early 40's.  I say this because ever since I was a young boy in
the late 50's, I can
remember seing this on a color code chart as well as in practice in such
things as VTVM's,
Signal Generators, etc.   Also, when I was in the Navy, we used color codes
using both as
Tolerence indicators as well as Multipliers.  So, what this boils down to is
that I believe this to
have been in practice since at least the 50's, and most likely since the
late 30's or early 40's.
It may go back even further than this possibly, but I cannot verify this
from first hand experience.
Does this help any, or confuse you even more?


Regards,


Jim





{Original Message removed}

1999\07\04@195514 by Tracey DeChambeau

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Just some trivia for the most part, what does a red tolerance band mean?
If anyone is interested in a way of remembering the color codes E-mail me,
it's a little off color for a list  :o)
Tracey

1999\07\04@204333 by Nick Taylor

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Tracey DeChambeau wrote:
>
> Just some trivia for the most part, what does a red tolerance band mean?
> If anyone is interested in a way of remembering the color codes E-mail me,
> it's a little off color for a list  :o)
> Tracey

In 1999 the Boy Scouts use:
  Better Be Right Or Your Great Big Venture Goes West

In 1952 the U.S. military taught me:
  Bad Boys Rape Our Young Girls But Violet Gives Willingly

In code class they also taught me:
  dit dah dah dit - the girls love it

Times have certainly changed!

- Nick -

1999\07\04@205413 by Brian Aase

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For the modern metal oxide "flameproof" resistors, a red band
means 2% tolerance.  ECG has a whole line of these.

> Just some trivia for the most part, what does a red tolerance band mean?
> If anyone is interested in a way of remembering the color codes E-mail me,
> it's a little off color for a list  :o) Tracey

1999\07\04@205828 by Tracey DeChambeau

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So right...the times are a changin'
you didn't tell me what the red  tolerance band stood for though.  :o)
Tracey

1999\07\05@095041 by Francisco Armenta

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part 0 672 bytes content-type:text/x-vcard; charset=us-ascii; (decoded 7bit)

John Hansen wrote:

> Hi:
>
>         I'm trying to decipher a resistor value on a schematic that I believe
is
> of UK origin.  The value is 10R.   I'm pretty sure this doesn't mean 10K
> because there are some other 10K values on the schematic.  My guess is that
> is 10 ohms.  Can anyone confirm this?
>
> John Hansen

Content-Type: text/x-vcard; charset=us-ascii;
name="briones.vcf"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Description: Card for Francisco Armenta
Content-Disposition: attachment;
filename="briones.vcf"

Attachment converted: wonderland:briones.vcf (TEXT/CSOm) (00009871)

1999\07\05@114017 by Quentin

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Nigel Goodwin wrote:

>
> If the value was R10 (as opposed to the circuit reference), it would be
> 0.1 ohms. Talking of low value resistors, does anyone know when silver
> and gold were added as multipliers as well as tolerance bands?. They
> only seem to have started being used in the last few years, and were
> never mentioned when I was at college or in any colour code tables I
> ever saw?.
> --
>
> Nigel.
As others pointed out, it's been around for a while. But it is not a
widly used value for low wattage resistors, thus I can understand the no
mention.

Not as bad as when I came across a resistor a few years ago with just
one black line in the centre. Took me a while to figure out it just
means 0ohm and is just a fancy way for the manufacturer to put a
bridge/link/jumper on the PC board.

Or so I thought, until somebody (manufacturer of boards) pointed out to
me it is also a "fusable link" for the PC board to protect the tracks,
thus if the track overloads, the 0ohm resistor will burn out before the
track will.

Interesting. But for me, I'll still go: "Hmmm, sayz he, with a blank
look on his face."

Quentin

1999\07\05@161627 by wwl

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>
>Not as bad as when I came across a resistor a few years ago with just
>one black line in the centre. Took me a while to figure out it just
>means 0ohm and is just a fancy way for the manufacturer to put a
>bridge/link/jumper on the PC board.
.. and a year or two ago, The Farnell catalogue specified these as
follows :
Resistance :  0 ohms
Tolerance   :  5%
>
I had half a mind to ring them and ask if they could get me some 1%
ones!

1999\07\05@183647 by paulb

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Quentin wrote:

> Took me a while to figure out it just means 0ohm and is just a fancy
> way for the manufacturer to put a bridge/link/jumper on the PC board.

> Or so I thought, until somebody (manufacturer of boards) pointed out
> to me it is also a "fusible link" for the PC board to protect the
> tracks, thus if the track overloads, the 0ohm resistor will burn out
> before the track will.

 Presuming it actually uses a deposited track, in which case it is
wrongly marked, as it *must* have some resistance to operate as a fuse.

 An interesting exercise - calculate how much resistance.  To dissipate
1W for example at 5 amps, it would have to be 0.05 ohms (green-black-
white IIRC).

 My suspicion is however that the "0 ohm" leaded units are what they
look like - a piece of wire with a "body" moulded over, and would fuse
at something like 80 amps!  Perhaps they have a "pinch" in the middle.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\07\06@020549 by Nigel Goodwin

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In message <000801bec677$e3140320$2ea1a3d1@jim>, Jim Paul
<.....jamespKILLspamspam.....INTERTEX.NET> writes
>All,
>
>AFAIK, Gold and Silver bands were used to indicate both a multiplier value
>Gold being .01
>and Silver being .1.  As a tolerence band, Gold is 5% and Silver is 10%.
>And also AFAIK,

That was the wrong way round, Gold is 0.1 and silver 0.01 :-).

{Quote hidden}

I suppose then it's been about a long time, but never used much in
practice as there's not been much call for such small values until
fairly recently with transistorised equipment - not much use for 0.22
ohms with valves (sorry, tubes for our USA viewers!).

Most places I see then now are in switchmode PSU's, usually in series
with the secondary rectifiers, basically intended to blow if the diode
goes duff!.
--

Nigel.

       /--------------------------------------------------------------\
       | Nigel Goodwin   | Internet : EraseMEnigelgspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTlpilsley.demon.co.uk     |
       | Lower Pilsley   | Web Page : http://www.lpilsley.demon.co.uk |
       | Chesterfield    | Official site for Shin Ki and New Spirit   |
       | England         |                 Ju Jitsu                   |
       \--------------------------------------------------------------/

1999\07\06@020553 by Nigel Goodwin

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In message <377FFF42.593D9D80spamspam_OUTiname.com>, Nick Taylor
<@spam@ntaylorKILLspamspamINAME.COM> writes
>Tracey DeChambeau wrote:
>>
>> Just some trivia for the most part, what does a red tolerance band mean?
>> If anyone is interested in a way of remembering the color codes E-mail me,
>> it's a little off color for a list  :o)
>> Tracey

I presume this has already been answered, but a red tolerance band is
2%, and they usually have five bands rather than four!.

>In 1999 the Boy Scouts use:
>   Better Be Right Or Your Great Big Venture Goes West
>
>In 1952 the U.S. military taught me:
>   Bad Boys Rape Our Young Girls But Violet Gives Willingly

The version I was given at college in 1972 (I already knew the colour
code anyway!), was Bad Boys Rape Our Young Girls But Virgins Get Wise.
--

Nigel.

       /--------------------------------------------------------------\
       | Nigel Goodwin   | Internet : KILLspamnigelgKILLspamspamlpilsley.demon.co.uk     |
       | Lower Pilsley   | Web Page : http://www.lpilsley.demon.co.uk |
       | Chesterfield    | Official site for Shin Ki and New Spirit   |
       | England         |                 Ju Jitsu                   |
       \--------------------------------------------------------------/

1999\07\06@035042 by Ansel Sermersheim

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{Quote hidden}

Looking at the Zerohms in my Digi-key catalog (#Q992, p. 356), they're
listed as:

1/8 Watt
Ohms Max/Typ 0.004 / 0.002
Current: 25A at 25C, derated to 0A at 125C

The 1/4W ones are the same, but 0.003 ohms max.

It's interesting to note that with the maximum resistance, the
max. power rating on the 1/8W jumpers is reached at only 5A.

They certainly are not specified for fusing, and I wouldn't use them
as such.

-Ansel
--
... it would appear that McDs is now trying some more "ethnic" food, a
"Lamb McSpicy", and (IIRC) "Chicken McNaan Korma". I'm fairly sure neither
will taste like any Indian food I've seen before, and possibly not like lamb
or chicken.                                     -Peter Corlett on fast food

1999\07\06@083019 by paulb

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Ansel Sermersheim wrote:

> It's interesting to note that with the maximum resistance, the
> max. power rating on the 1/8W jumpers is reached at only 5A.

 That being the current at which they will *not* fuse.

> They certainly are not specified for fusing, and I wouldn't use them
> as such.

 I'd somehow suspect they would outlive most PCB (signal) traces.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\07\06@094732 by Matt Bonner

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"Paul B. Webster VK2BZC" wrote:
>
>   My suspicion is however that the "0 ohm" leaded units are what they
> look like - a piece of wire with a "body" moulded over, and would fuse
> at something like 80 amps!  Perhaps they have a "pinch" in the middle.

Also, back in the dark ages before multi-layer boards, a 0 ohm resistor
could be used as a "jumper" to help in laying out dense boards.  It had
the advantage over a simple wire in that it could be handled by
automated assembly equipment.

--Matt

1999\07\06@111723 by John Pfaff

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For a 0 ohm resistor, isn't the tolerance multiplier more or less
meaningless?

>
>Not as bad as when I came across a resistor a few years ago with just
>one black line in the centre. Took me a while to figure out it just
>means 0ohm and is just a fancy way for the manufacturer to put a
>bridge/link/jumper on the PC board.
.. and a year or two ago, The Farnell catalogue specified these as
follows :
Resistance :  0 ohms
Tolerance   :  5%
>
I had half a mind to ring them and ask if they could get me some 1%
ones!

1999\07\06@150649 by Mark Willis

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IMO, That was the exact essence of his jest!  <G>

 Mark

John Pfaff wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1999\07\06@194919 by Tracey DeChambeau

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John,
 You must be an engineer, in the real world even wire has resistance,  not
quite sure how you'd tolerance it to zero though...   :o)
Tracey

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