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'[OT] The Maximite Computer'
2011\07\27@225201 by RussellMc

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>  Yes, it's true that most people who want
> really good performance will do everything in C,

But 'real men'* [tm] will do it in assembler.


R


* 'real men' includes real men and real women but noting this "inline"
makes it all less euphonic.

2011\07\27@232603 by Kerry Wentworth

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No, real men use

>Copy con file.exe

;)

Kerry


RussellMc wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2011\07\27@234419 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

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Yes, I used this already (honest). But not for ".exe", just ".com"

Very simple program, with 20 or 30 bytes typed using right-ALT+numbers,
calling one or two int 21h functions.


Isaac




Em 28/7/2011 00:24, Kerry Wentworth escreveu:
{Quote hidden}

>>

2011\07\27@235406 by RussellMc

face picon face
> No, real men use

>     Copy con file.exe

I used copy con ...  few hours ago. Really :-).

First time in some while.
Just a data file though.

My friend Ken notes:

"really real men" [tm] will do it in microcode
"really really real men" [tm] will do it in VHDL (or Verilog, or System/C)

_______

If the Maximite had done XVGA colour I would have bought one on the spot.
Still probably will.
One would probably lead to many.
Looks like a potentially marvellous workhorse. USB. SD. ...

        Russell


         Russel

2011\07\28@000058 by John Gardner

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Propeller BASIC...

http://forums.parallax.com/showthread.php?118611-Download-PropBASIC-here...-00.01.11-June-9-2011&highlight=RCSLOW

Jac

2011\07\28@002011 by Don McKenzie

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On 28-Jul-11 2:00 PM, John Gardner wrote:
> Propeller BASIC...
>
> http://forums.parallax.com/showthread.php?118611-Download-PropBASIC-here....-00.01.11-June-9-2011&highlight=RCSLOW
>
>   Jack

and what was said recently on the same forum about Maximite:

forums.parallax.com/archive/index.php/t-130030.html
"Sad- why has no one done this with a prop"

Cheers Don...

-- Don McKenzie
http://www.dontronics-shop.com/maximite-sm1.html

2011\07\28@024721 by Oli Glaser

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face
On 28/07/2011 04:53, RussellMc wrote:
> "really really real men" [tm] will do it in VHDL (or Verilog, or System/C)

I see - I can claim to be treading the rocky path of the "really really real" at the moment then, as I have been wrestling with Verilog (and the results of in synplicity) for the last 3 days (and nights) and trying to floorplan/optimise/close timing for a design.
I'm really going to enjoy heading off into the wilderness after I get these projects all finished, get away from technology for a while... (maybe I should take a spear and hunt for my food - that's what the "real men" used to do :-) )
On a related note, I'm halfway through E.M.Forsters "the Machine Stops", (one of his short stories, written in 1928 I think) and I heartily recommend it to fellow Piclisters.




2011\07\28@054014 by alan.b.pearce

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>
> >  Yes, it's true that most people who want
> > really good performance will do everything in C,
>
> But 'real men'* [tm] will do it in assembler.
>
>
>  R
>
>
> * 'real men' includes real men and real women but noting this "inline"
> makes it all less euphonic.

I once used an assembler known as REAL, stood for Relocatable Assembler. The company had earlier had a non-relocatable assembler.
-- Scanned by iCritical.

2011\07\28@060317 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 28/07/2011 10:39, spam_OUTalan.b.pearceTakeThisOuTspamstfc.ac.uk wrote:
> I once used an assembler known as REAL, stood for Relocatable Assembler. The company had earlier had a non-relocatable assembler.

Only once did I use a system where you typed the hex bytes of the machine code.  I thought after this  that if Macro Assemblers are for Sissys buy me a pink pair of jeans to go with it.

Give me the Quiche eater & Sissy tools please. Then I'll have spare time to be a "Real Man" (or if you are not me, and of the female persuasion you'll have time to be a Real Woman)

2011\07\28@074546 by RussellMc

face picon face
>> I once used an assembler known as REAL, stood for Relocatable Assembler. The company had earlier had a non-relocatable assembler.

That's unreal!
(OK then non-real :-) ).

> Only once did I use a system where you typed the hex bytes of the
> machine code.  I thought after this  that if Macro Assemblers are for
> Sissys buy me a pink pair of jeans to go with it.

> Give me the Quiche eater & Sissy tools please. Then I'll have spare time
> to be a "Real Man" (or if you are not me, and of the female persuasion
> you'll have time to be a Real Woman).

OK. Too too long ago I must have been a real man [tm].
I did a Masters degree which included producing machine code in hex
without an assembler and hand keying it on a hex keyboard. aka D2 kit
as core of system :-).

Relative branches all by hand (or head) computation.
Jump tables at start of code to make life easier.
Hex instruction set fully memorised (of course). Could read hex code
by eye with ease (of course).

Fragments are still lodged in the brain.
26 BNE   27 BEQ   20 BRA
CE LDX, i
86 LDA, i ...

The beautifully symmetric and well grouped nature of the 6800
instructions and bit fields within the instructions helped immensely.
Doing the same thing on an 8080 or PIC would have been vastly harder.
This was just fortuitous - the 6800 was chosen without this feature in
mind. The choice then was essentially 8080 or 6800. The existence of
the D2 kit was a major factor. MIKBug needed eg ASR33 which we had not
got.

At the "peak" (as it were) as a "party trick" I could power up a D2
kit and hand key from memory a moving message program that displayed a
moving text message - text being part of what was keyed in (such as it
was with a 7 segment display). Familiarity with code etc overall was
such that one didn't so much have to remember the program overall as
to remember what part came next and rewrite the program in your head
as you went. Needless to say we were "fairly good at assembler" back
then :-).

Those were the days (up hill both ways in the snow cardboard box ...).
Long gone, thank goodness.

Macro assemblers came later. I recall at the time not knowing what
Quiche was when someone mentioned it :-) [[That was you, Ross (BCC)] ]


        Russell

2011\07\28@122529 by Dwayne Reid

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I've seen a lot of people lambasting Basic and I don't really understand why.

First, let me preface this by saying that I do NOT want to start a war here.  Instead, let me mention what I see.

I have a buddy (former co-worker) who can program circles around me in everything except assembler.  He writes in C or C++ for stuff that runs on a PC and he uses PIC Basic Pro for anything that he writes that runs on a PIC.  He can understand something that I write in assembler but he has a hard time writing it himself.

Just like me - I can understand what he writes in PIC Basic Pro but I have a hard time writing it myself.

He can bang a PIC project out at least two or three times faster than I can - he writes in Basic while I write in assembler.

I use him to write code for low-volume projects where time really is money.  I tend to write most of the code for our high-volume projects (in assembler) where saving a buck per PIC really adds up over the years (tens of thousands of dollars).

I guess that what I am saying is this: there really is room for easy-to-use languages like JAL and BASIC as well as the higher-end languages like C.

dwayne

-- Dwayne Reid   <.....dwaynerKILLspamspam@spam@planet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax
http://www.trinity-electronics.com
Custom Electronics Design and Manufacturing

2011\07\28@124833 by alan.b.pearce

face picon face
> I guess that what I am saying is this: there really is room for
> easy-to-use languages like JAL and BASIC as well as the higher-end
> languages like C.

I would have to agree with this, the number of times I have done a 'quick and dirty' BASICA program on a PC to generate a data file for something, or a simulation file for MPLAB, I have lost count of.

Basic, in its many forms, has its uses.


-- Scanned by iCritical.

2011\07\28@125650 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
On Thu, Jul 28, 2011 at 5:25 PM, Dwayne Reid <dwaynerspamKILLspamplanet.eon.net> wrote:

> I've seen a lot of people lambasting Basic and I don't really understand
> why.
>

Sorry about that, it was mainly my rant and which made it even worse on a
wrong tag (funnily I cannot see tag changes on a Google Mail).

Anyway, what i have said is that Basic as it is known today is *not* Basic.
Pretty much as some would say C# is a C. It is not.

In the early '80s my father wrote his mighty budget calculator software in
AppleSoft Basic and worked, but that was definitely not meant to do anything
like that. Lots of times the otherwise wonderful Apple II just stopped for
arranging the garbage collection and stuff, but it is not all about this. A
*Basic* is not a structured language and does not make any effort to force
you or even allow you to write easy to understand and easy to maintain code..
You just write line number and then GOSUB 200 or NEXT 10 and stuff, that
just does not work in large projects.

A modern Basic however is nothing to do with these kind of things. But that
makes it a different language than a Basic. Basic++ or Basic# or SuperBasic,
but it is just not Basic. That allows you to create labels and functions and
other structured elements, some even support objects and classes.

I cannot talk on behalf of anyone else but for me all bad feelings on
hearing the word 'Basic' comes from these early years remembering all the
sleepless nights finding bugs on an otherwise simple methods. And then
discovering brilliance and superiority of the Turbo Pascal on the Microsoft
CP/M card.

Most probably I am wrong saying anything bad though on these modern Basic++
implementations and I did not want to start any flame about it.

Tamas






{Quote hidden}

>

2011\07\28@131008 by Matt Pobursky

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Well said Dwayne.

At my company we develop with about 10 different CPU families, depending
which best fits the application. We also do a lot of small and medium
volume projects where the software development and debug time are the major
cost drivers. We develop almost 100% in C. About 10-15 years ago we
standardized on a software template that maximizes code reusability. The
result is we now have well over 100 library modules that can (and are)
freely ported between PIC, AVR, MSP430, ARM and a few other architectures.

When we start a new application now we can generally have all of the
prototype hardware devices and application shell up and running in a day or
two. Then the bulk of the work is the project specific application. Writing
new hardware device drivers are the exception rather than the rule. It's
cut down dramatically on the time it takes from start to finish for a new
project. It also allows us to be fairly hardware agnostic with regards to
the CPU in our designs.

Matt Pobursky
Maximum Performance Systems
On Thu, 28 Jul 2011 10:25:22 -0600, Dwayne Reid wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> Custom Electronics Design and Manufacturing

2011\07\28@133704 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

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Em 28/7/2011 13:48, alan.b.pearcespamspam_OUTstfc.ac.uk escreveu:
>> I guess that what I am saying is this: there really is room for
>> easy-to-use languages like JAL and BASIC as well as the higher-end
>> languages like C.
> I would have to agree with this, the number of times I have done a 'quick and dirty' BASICA program on a PC to generate a data file for something, or a simulation file for MPLAB, I have lost count of.
>
> Basic, in its many forms, has its uses.


For the C lovers, like me, this niche can be filled nowadays by Perl. It
is derived from C and is ubiquitous.

Isaac

2011\07\28@135028 by Herbert Graf

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On Thu, 2011-07-28 at 14:37 -0300, Isaac Marino Bavaresco wrote:
> Em 28/7/2011 13:48, @spam@alan.b.pearceKILLspamspamstfc.ac.uk escreveu:
> >> I guess that what I am saying is this: there really is room for
> >> easy-to-use languages like JAL and BASIC as well as the higher-end
> >> languages like C.
> > I would have to agree with this, the number of times I have done a 'quick and dirty' BASICA program on a PC to generate a data file for something, or a simulation file for MPLAB, I have lost count of.
> >
> > Basic, in its many forms, has its uses.
>
>
> For the C lovers, like me, this niche can be filled nowadays by Perl. It
> is derived from C and is ubiquitous.

Agreed. Most of my quick and dirty stuff is either done in perl, or more
often then not just a shell script (tcsh usually), since I'm lucky
enough to use an OS with a shell that's actually useful for scripting.

TTYL

2011\07\28@145907 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Jul 28, 2011, at 2:39 AM, KILLspamalan.b.pearceKILLspamspamstfc.ac.uk wrote:

> I once used an assembler known as REAL

I once uses an assembler known as FAIL.

BillW

2011\07\28@151003 by Carey Fisher

face picon face
No. Real men toggle in the bootstrap using front panel switches and then
load the OS from DECTape.

Carey Fisher
Chief Technical Officer
New Communications Solutions, LLC
678-999-3956
RemoveMEcareyfisherTakeThisOuTspamncsradio.com




On Wed, Jul 27, 2011 at 10:51 PM, RussellMc <spamBeGoneapptechnzspamBeGonespamgmail.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>

2011\07\28@152853 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> I guess that what I am saying is this: there really is room for
> easy-to-use languages like JAL and BASIC as well as the higher-end
> languages like C.

First I think as a language Jal is much more like C or Pascal than Basic. It is of course different in the fact that it is not backed by a company but by a bunch of volunteers.

As for the 'room' for various languages (or chips, IDEs, PCB/schematic programs, etc): you can theorize to your hearts content, but the real test is the world 'out there'...

My E0.01 of theorizing: there is always room for a spectrum of languages, ranging from the 'easy for a small program, but hard for a large one' (BASIC seems to rule here) to 'hard to start, but you can write big applications without too much trouble' (on PICs for most people this means C).

--
Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2011\07\28@153603 by Roger, in Bangkok

face
flavicon
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Shades of Imsai S-100!!
:-)

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 02:09, Carey Fisher <TakeThisOuTcareyfisherEraseMEspamspam_OUTncsradio.com>wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> > --

2011\07\28@154723 by RussellMc

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> > No. Real men toggle in the bootstrap using front panel switches and then
> > load the OS from DECTape.

> Shades of Imsai S-100!!

Actually, shades of a LARGE [tm] CDC development machine (was there
any other size for CDC?) and Seymour Cray - or so the legend goes.
Hand key in bootstrap from console switches. Boot from tape.

Probably not a DEC Tape though :-). Almost certainly a paper tape of some sort.



        Russel

2011\07\28@154733 by Carey Fisher

face picon face
Or PDP-8 :-}
Carey Fisher
Chief Technical Officer
New Communications Solutions, LLC
678-999-3956
EraseMEcareyfisherspamncsradio.com




On Thu, Jul 28, 2011 at 3:35 PM, Roger, in Bangkok <RemoveMEmerciesEraseMEspamEraseMEcscoms.com>wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>

2011\07\29@034824 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 28/07/2011 17:25, Dwayne Reid wrote:
> I guess that what I am saying is this: there really is room for
> easy-to-use languages like JAL and BASIC as well as the higher-end
> languages like C.
>
There are appropriate applications for BASIC, assuming it's not really BASIC, but the modern "pascal like" variety that has types, functions and  procedures.


C is very powerful, but actually not a true High level language, it's more an advanced Macro Assembler.

The objections to original advertising blurb was not really specifically about BASIC as such, but the idea that some how the major selling point is to describe a 2011 product as a 1980s BASIC product on Steroids. A off putting description. Also being able to develop on it with just a keyboard and and screen again is a major 1980s selling point, but actually of little value today.

2011\07\29@040138 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 28/07/2011 20:28, Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> First I think as a language Jal is much more like C or Pascal than
> Basic. It is of course different in the fact that it is not backed by a
> company but by a bunch of volunteers.
>
> As for the 'room' for various languages (or chips, IDEs, PCB/schematic
> programs, etc): you can theorize to your hearts content, but the real
> test is the world 'out there'...
>
> My E0.01 of theorizing: there is always room for a spectrum of
> languages, ranging from the 'easy for a small program, but hard for a
> large one' (BASIC seems to rule here) to 'hard to start, but you can
> write big applications without too much trouble' (on PICs for most
> people this means C).

Yes, all agreed.

The main advantages of C is that there is
:: so much stuff written in it
:: On virtually every CPU and Platform
:: Quite efficient and fast except on CPUs without  a real user stack.
:: Assembler like bit operations (because it's really a machine independent Macro Assembler).

But it's not as readable as JAL, BASIC, Ada, Modula-2, Pascal etc. Especially if people write in a "traditional" C style.

JAL is unusual as really it was developed for the 10F/12F/16F family (and thus is good for 18F too). A "JAL" for ARMs, MIPs, PIC24, x86 etc ought to be different and have separate compilation, true Modules, Objects etc to support larger projects.

2011\07\29@042215 by RussellMc

face picon face
> Also being able to develop on it with just a
> keyboard and and screen again is a major 1980s selling point, but
> actually of little value today.

.... to people in the top 10% of the richest people on earth (most
people on this list) who have a bank account, know where their next
meal is coming from, have a life expectancy  of more than 70 years and
are not a desperately poor and struggling student or other. (Choose
some. Optional: cardboard box, bare feet, snow, uphill both ways,
lake, ...).  Not many people who aspire to programming embedded
computer systems will fall in that category, but those who do will
(probably) think such an ability is just dandy.

           Russel

2011\07\29@045136 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 29/07/2011 09:21, RussellMc wrote:
>> Also being able to develop on it with just a
>> >  keyboard and and screen again is a major 1980s selling point, but
>> >  actually of little value today.
> ... to people in the top 10% of the richest people on earth (most
> people on this list) who have a bank account, know where their next
> meal is coming from, have a life expectancy  of more than 70 years and
> are not a desperately poor and struggling student or other. (Choose
> some. Optional: cardboard box, bare feet, snow, uphill both ways,
> lake, ...).  Not many people who aspire to programming embedded
> computer systems will fall in that category, but those who do will
> (probably) think such an ability is just dandy.

If you have a VGA monitor and an PC keyboard, you likely have the bit in between.

Many people in the world of course don't even have the electricity for a VGA monitor, so a self contained programmable unit should thus have hand crank / solar panel, built in LCD that works without back light and built in keyboard. Possibly option slot for GSM module or phone.

2011\07\29@050943 by RussellMc

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part 1 1105 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset="Windows-1252" (decoded quoted-printable)

> If you have a VGA monitor and an PC keyboard, you likely have the bit in
> between.

If you have neither they can generally be acquired for less than the
bit in the middle.

> Many people in the world of course don't even have the electricity for a
> VGA monitor, so a self contained programmable unit should thus have hand
> crank / solar panel, built in LCD that works without back light and
> built in keyboard. Possibly option slot for GSM module or phone.

Indeed.
It's called an OLPC.

                  http://laptop.org/en/laptop/

"A small machine with a big mission. The XO is a potent learning tool
designed and built especially for children in developing countries,
living in some of the most remote environments. Itís about the size of
a small textbook. It has built-in wireless and a unique screen that is
readable under direct sunlight for children who go to school outdoors.
Itís extremely durable, brilliantly functional, energy-efficient, and
fun."

Specs:   http://laptop.org/en/laptop/hardware/specs.shtml


part 2 25225 bytes content-type:image/jpeg; name="OLPC XO.jpg" (decode)


part 3 181 bytes content-type:text/plain; name="ATT00001.txt"
(decoded base64)

--
http://www.piclist.com PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist

2011\07\29@052650 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 29/07/2011 10:08, RussellMc wrote:
> Indeed.
> It's called an OLPC.

Maybe... I hear mixed views and reports.

But then I'm a sceptical person

2011\07\29@054619 by RussellMc

face picon face
>> It's called an OLPC.
>
> Maybe...

No maybe. That does meet most of your description.

But ...

>I hear mixed views and reports.

Yes. Not unexpected. Attempts to make silk purses from sows ears are
always challenging.
Original target price was $US100 which I understand rose to closer to
$US200. It aims at more than a std netbook in some areas (eg touch
screen) and thus makes life hard for itself in others.

During 2010 "Boxing day sales" silly season we bought my wife an Acer
e-machine netbook. Superb for the $. XP home, 1 GB, 150?GB, WiFi. Long
battery life, fine for Skype, handles all non technical person's day
to day PC needs. With Acer $50 cashback, bought at retail it cost us
$US220. Cheapest new PC I've seen so far. If that is presumed to be
about break even overall it augurs well for the future.

> But then I'm a sceptical person.

I should hope so :-)
You'd not be alone i that.


2011\07\29@084001 by Carey Fisher

face picon face
I bought two - one for me and one that was sent to (a child in need
somewhere).  It worked pretty well, a little slow, but certainly on the
right track for the OLPC mission.

Carey Fisher
Chief Technical Officer
New Communications Solutions, LLC
678-999-3956
RemoveMEcareyfisherKILLspamspamncsradio.com




On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 5:25 AM, Michael Watterson <mikeSTOPspamspamspam_OUTradioway.org>wrote:

> On 29/07/2011 10:08, RussellMc wrote:
> > Indeed.
> > It's called an OLPC.
>
> Maybe... I hear mixed views and reports.
>
> But then I'm a sceptical person.
>

2011\07\29@084850 by Carey Fisher

face picon face
On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 4:50 AM, Michael Watterson <spamBeGonemikeSTOPspamspamEraseMEradioway.org>wrote:

>
>
> Many people in the world of course don't even have the electricity for a
> VGA monitor, ...
>
>
> And whose fault is that?

Carey Fishe

2011\07\29@093857 by RussellMc

face picon face
>> Many people in the world of course don't even have the electricity for a
>> VGA monitor, ...

>> And whose fault is that?

1. That line of discussion is liable to lead to death of thread in no
time flat. If pursuing it, BE MATURE. That won't help, alas, but ...

2. "Green". Or "Three". Or moderately" or ... .

ie the introduction of the question of "fault" into a discussion of
that sort is highly liable to disrupt it.

eg "Most people have two legs". "Whose fault is that?"
even "Most people are born into countries that have below top decile
GDPs"*. "Whose fault is that?"

* ie a certainty in a real world.

Much as we may wish that all the worlds "wrongs" or "inequities" or
undesirable inequalities  were righted before lunchtime, attributing
blame as of right when the issue is raised is probably a conversation
killer.


 Russel

2011\07\29@095939 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 29/07/2011 13:40, Carey Fisher wrote:
> And whose fault is that?

no idea.

Likely not the fault of one person or even one nation. Why is South America not "richer" and more advanced than North America? Or India and China more "advanced" than Europe?

There is no simple answer.

Why is Africa so poor compared to anywhere else? Why does Africa export food?

Why is Northern Italy "better" than Southern in "wealth" but vice versa in UK?

I have no answers.

2011\07\29@100513 by Carey Fisher

face picon face
Yeah, I momentarily lost control of my good sense.  Sorry about that chief.

Carey Fisher
Chief Technical Officer
New Communications Solutions, LLC
678-999-3956
KILLspamcareyfisherspamBeGonespamncsradio.com




On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 9:38 AM, RussellMc <EraseMEapptechnzspamEraseMEgmail.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>

2011\07\29@100717 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 29/07/2011 14:38, RussellMc wrote:
> Much as we may wish that all the worlds "wrongs" or "inequities" or
> undesirable inequalities  were righted before lunchtime, attributing
> blame as of right when the issue is raised is probably a conversation
> killer.
>

Probably
1) Those responsible for the state we are in are all long dead.

2) Expert Historians and Economists  can't agree on quite why things are as they are. There is more faith, wishful thinking and prejudice than facts I think.

3) If Hari Seldon was real he might think the information gathering and sample size too small for conclusions.

4) knowing whose "fault" it is (even if we could), isn't likely to fix anything, given past track record.

It's hard enough to fix our own lives, finances, relationships than those of distant people. It's where most of of us need to start. Rather than assigning "blame".

2011\07\29@115848 by John Gardner

picon face
....hard enough to fix our own lives, finances, relationships...

Not to mention off-by-one errors.

Maximite looks like good fun. If the uP could be pgmed in it's
native Klingon I don't think I'd be able to resist...  :)

Jac

2011\07\29@121414 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 29/07/2011 16:58, John Gardner wrote:
> Maximite looks like good fun. If the uP could be pgmed in it's
> native Klingon I don't think I'd be able to resist...:)
>

The native code for MIPS is Klingon?

Who'd have thunk it?



What about a instruction set based on Folklore and Metaphor?  Prototype it on a Virtex 6 FPGA

http://xkcd.com/902

2011\07\29@123449 by John Gardner

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....a instruction set based on Folklore and Metaphor?

Suit yourself, young fella...  :

2011\07\29@150314 by Sergey Dryga

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Michael Watterson <mike <at> radioway.org> writes:

> Likely not the fault of one person or even one nation. Why is South
> America not "richer" and more advanced than North America? Or India and
> China more "advanced" than Europe?
>
> There is no simple answer.
>
> Why is Africa so poor compared to anywhere else? Why does Africa export
> food?
>
> Why is Northern Italy "better" than Southern in "wealth" but vice versa
> in UK?
>
> I have no answers.
> This does have some answers, that seem reasonable:
http://www.amazon.com/Guns-Germs-Steel-Fates-Societies/dp/0393317552

Pretty interesting read.

Sergey Dryga
http://beaglerobotics.com

2011\07\29@152924 by RussellMc

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I think this is a great threadlet so far.
Handled responsibly it could do some (small) good for the world, and for us..

BUT it is so so on the razor edge that anyone could kill it in a trice.
Brother Bob will hate it for that reason.
Prove him wrong - he'd be pleased.

Prove him right and he'll be very annoyed.
He's usually right, alas.


   Russell

{Quote hidden}

> http://www.amazon.com/Guns-Germs-Steel-Fates-Societies/dp/039331755

2011\07\29@161406 by Bob Blick

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On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 14:58 +0100, "Michael Watterson" wrote:
> On 29/07/2011 13:40, Carey Fisher wrote:
> > And whose fault is that?
>
> no idea.
>
> Likely not the fault of one person or even one nation. Why is South
> America not "richer" and more advanced than North America? Or India and
> China more "advanced" than Europe?
>
> There is no simple answer.
>
> Why is Africa so poor compared to anywhere else? Why does Africa export
> food?
>
> Why is Northern Italy "better" than Southern in "wealth" but vice versa
> in UK?
>
> I have no answers.

Next time you think about posting something like this, send me $20 and
I'll give you a pass. It's usually better not to involve yourself in
global comparisons or social psychology here. We are all guilty of that
type of self-indulgence, but if you can catch yourself before you hit
send, +1 to you.

Best regards,

Bob

-- http://www.fastmail.fm - Choose from over 50 domains or use your own

2011\07\29@163117 by Bob Blick

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On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 08:47 +0100, "Michael Watterson"  wrote:

> Also being able to develop on it with just a
> keyboard and and screen again is a major 1980s selling point, but
> actually of little value today.

Agreed, it's a cute novelty. Speaking of which, the Raspberry Pi looks
to be similar but in a different corner of the niche:

http://www.raspberrypi.org/

Friendly regards,

Bob

-- http://www.fastmail.fm - Does exactly what it says on the tin

2011\07\29@171057 by YES NOPE9

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Please change the subject line   PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE


On Jul 29, 2011, at 1:02 PM, Sergey Dryga wrote:

Michael Watterson <mike <at> radioway.org> writes:

{Quote hidden}

http://www.amazon.com/Guns-Germs-Steel-Fates-Societies/dp/0393317552

Pretty interesting read.

Sergey Dryga
http://beaglerobotics.com

2011\07\30@035417 by Michael Watterson

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On 29/07/2011 21:31, Bob Blick wrote:
> Agreed, it's a cute novelty. Speaking of which, the Raspberry Pi looks
> to be similar but in a different corner of the niche:
>
> http://www.raspberrypi.org/
>
Open software (Ubuntu, Iceweasel, KOffice, Python)
OpenGL ES 2.0

http://www.raspberrypi.org/?page_id=2


'[OT] The Maximite Computer'
2011\08\09@011515 by Don McKenzie
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On 28-Jul-11 2:00 PM, John Gardner wrote:
> Propeller BASIC...
>
> http://forums.parallax.com/showthread.php?118611-Download-PropBASIC-here....-00.01.11-June-9-2011&highlight=RCSLOW
>
>   Jack

And for those that are actually interested, we now finally have ample stock:

http://www.dontronics-shop.com/maximite-sm1.html

Cheers Don...

=================


-- Don McKenzie

http://www.dontronics-shop.com/the-maximite-computer.htm

2011\08\09@082533 by John Gardner

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....And for those that are actually interested, we now finally have ample stock:

Nothing sells like charm ...  :)

Jac

2011\08\09@130229 by Peter Johansson

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On Tue, Aug 9, 2011 at 1:15 AM, Don McKenzie <@spam@support2011@spam@spamspam_OUTdontronics.com> wrote:

> And for those that are actually interested, we now finally have ample stock:
>
> http://www.dontronics-shop.com/maximite-sm1.html

I wonder how long before somebody gets RetroBSD running on one of these.  ;-)

-p

2011\08\19@193036 by Don McKenzie

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==============================
by Peter Johansson-9 Aug 10, 2011; 03:02am :: Rate this Message: - Use ratings to moderate (?)

I wonder how long before somebody gets RetroBSD running on one of these.  ;-)

==============================

Running now:
Maximite Computer now running Unix, 2.11BSD
now has:
pForth compiler
Xitami webserver

Thread at:
http://www.thebackshed.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=3925&PN=1

Story about a man who spent the last 12 months of his life porting BSD Unix to a Microchip PIC32 Microcontroller, for an open source project, and releasing it in the last couple of days.

developer.mips.com/2011/08/06/about-retrobsd-a-port-of-bsd-unix-to-a-microchip-pic32-microcontroller/
Read the comments

===============================

TRS-80 Model I, level II on a PIC32?

see:
http://kenseglerdesigns.com/cms/sites/default/files/trs-80.jpg

for the thread:
http://www.thebackshed.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=3937&PN=1

==============================

Cheers Don...

=========


-- Don McKenzie

Dontronics Site Map: http://www.dontronics.com/sitemap
E-Mail Contact Page: http://www.dontronics.com/email
Web Camera Page:     http://www.dontronics.com/webcam
No More Damn Spam:   http://www.dontronics.com/spam

New MMBasic Computer http://www.TheMaximiteComputer.com

These products will reduce in price by 5% every month:
www.dontronics-shop.com/minus-5-every-month.html
http://www.dontronics-shop.com/ics.html

Bare Proto PCB for PIC or AVR projects?
"I'd buy that for a Dollar!".
http://www.dontronics-shop.com/simmstick-fifteen-years-on.htm

2011\08\20@172209 by David Bley

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I  don't know much about video displays.  Has anyone got a code/hardware mod for Maximite to support composite video for NTSC?  Just curious.

I think that Maximite is cool.  Does anyone remember how much of a productivity boost it was to go from a typewriter to a word processor

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