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'[OT] Solder fumes?'
2005\06\04@132826 by Mark Chauvin

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I've got an office I built in my garage, about 10' x
12', fully enclosed, and I do a bit of
soldering/assembly work for a couple of hours a day.
I've got a small fan that blows the fumes away from
the work surface when I solder, but shouldn't I also
have either an exhaust fan or air filter of some kind?
What's a good, cheap way to get rid of solder fumes?
Would a filter like an Ionic Breeze do anything?

TIA
-Mark

2005\06\04@134056 by Thomas Sefranek

face picon face
The Ionic breeze will filter out the rosin smoke particles.
BUT... You have to clean the element with alcohol.

Tom

 *
 |  __O    Thomas C. Sefranek   spam_OUTWA1RHPTakeThisOuTspamARRL.NET
 |_-\<,_   Amateur Radio Operator: WA1RHP
 (*)/ (*)  Bicycle mobile on 145.41, PL 74.4

hamradio.cmcorp.com/inventory/Inventory.html
http://www.harvardrepeater.org  

> {Original Message removed}

2005\06\04@142957 by Carey Fisher - NCS

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part 1 976 bytes content-type:text/plain; (decoded 7bit)

I've been a ham since I was 14 and I've always
held solder in my mouth when I need a third hand.
It hasn't hurt me any - see attached picture.
Carey


  > {Original Message removed}

2005\06\04@170831 by Jamie Lyon

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I'm also interested in this, as I do not have a garage or anything to
work in, so I have to solder either in a room downstairs, or in my
room (where my main workbench is setup).

I am not soldering very often, every couple of weeks for an hour seems
about average, as most of my work is done on solderless breadboads.
While working, as with the OP I use a small fan pointing towards an
open window.

How safe is a setup like this considering the amount of soldering I
actually do? If unsafe, what can I do to make it safe on a reasonably
small amount of money?

-Jamie.


On 04/06/05, Mark Chauvin <.....chauvin555KILLspamspam@spam@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2005\06\05@010828 by Matthew Miller

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face
Hi Mark,

On Sat, Jun 04, 2005 at 10:28:26AM -0700, Mark Chauvin wrote:
> I've got an office I built in my garage, about 10' x
> 12', fully enclosed, and I do a bit of
> soldering/assembly work for a couple of hours a day.
> I've got a small fan that blows the fumes away from
> the work surface when I solder, but shouldn't I also
> have either an exhaust fan or air filter of some kind?
> What's a good, cheap way to get rid of solder fumes?
> Would a filter like an Ionic Breeze do anything?

Good ventilation is your best choice of action here. In addition to the fan
blowing fumes away from what you're working on, put a large box fan in the
doorway of the office to help circulate the air.

The only thing you really have to worry about here are the fumes from the
rosin. IMHO, I would worry about rosin fumes as much as I do about burning a
candle; which is very little. At the temperatures used for soldering, the
vapor pressure of lead and tin are so low that you don't have to worry about
inhaling vapors from these metals. Just be sure to wash your hands after you
work!

Take care, Matthew.

--
"The liberty of others extends mine to infinity."
          Graffito written during the
               French Student Revolt  -  May 1968

2005\06\05@033328 by Dmitriy Kiryashov

picon face
And brush your teeth after long soldering as well. Seriously :)
Metals vapor isn't that "very little" as it seems.


Matthew Miller wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2005\06\05@061453 by William Chops Westfield

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On Jun 4, 2005, at 10:08 PM, Matthew Miller wrote:

> The only thing you really have to worry about here are the fumes from
> the
> rosin. IMHO, I would worry about rosin fumes as much as I do about
> burning a
> candle; which is very little.

You might need to be more careful if you end up using one of the
non-rosin
flux solders.  I haven't kept track of what's in use or how obnoxious
they
are to inhale when burning, but obviously a "water washable" flux is no
longer
made from rosin (for example.)

Lead has a very low vapor pressure at the temperatures involved.  You
really
don't need to worry about inhaling lead...

BillW

2005\06\05@080437 by Mark Chauvin

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Thanks for the replies everyone.  What about the solder stations that have a
filter?  Are those effective, or just for businesses that solder for 8 hours
a day?  Here's one that I found via Google

http://www.sentryair.com/solder-sentry.htm

Don't know the cost.  It may be quite expensive, I don't know.  Over-kill?

2005\06\05@084750 by Philip Pemberton

face picon face
In message <7b59f2aebeba4ea008131c86fbe07a4espamKILLspammac.com>>          William "Chops" Westfield <.....westfwKILLspamspam.....mac.com> wrote:

> You might need to be more careful if you end up using one of the
> non-rosin
> flux solders.  I haven't kept track of what's in use or how obnoxious
> they
> are to inhale when burning, but obviously a "water washable" flux is no
> longer
> made from rosin (for example.)

Personally, I've been using rosin-based 60-40 SnPb solder for years. About
three years ago I cobbled together a primitive filter out of an 80mm mains
fan, a couple of fan guards, a carbon cooker-hood filter and a plastic box.
Problem is, it's not that effective. The fan blades are too small relative to
the motor and the fan casing.
One fan guard is on the exhaust side of the fan, and there are two placed
back-to-back (with a nut in the middle) on the other side. The filter fits
between the two guards and another nut locks the front guard in place.

If I built another one, I'd use a 120mm DC fan and a small 250mA 12V PSU. The
80mm just doesn't move enough air to make it worthwhile.

Total cost: About £10 (I found the fan in my junkbox - figure around £20-30
including the fan).

90% of the time I run the soldering iron at around 275C. I only ramp it up to
350 when I need to solder enamelled copper wire. The iron is a 50W Antex
temperature-controlled thing that hooks up to a 660TC base station. Works
quite well, and isn't as prone to thermal runaway as the non-regulated irons.
Cheap irons tend to go bang if the bit isn't locked on properly - the bit is
used to regulate the temperature (to some degree).
The other nice thing about temperature controlled kit is that you don't tend
to lift the tracks off the board as much - I had an iron that hit 400C and
literally cooked PCBs. Switched to the 660TC and set the temperature to a
reasonable level and I managed to solder a PCB without burning it to the
point where it looked as if it had been thrown in a fire...

Later.
-- Phil.                              | Acorn Risc PC600 Mk3, SA202, 64MB, 6GB,
EraseMEphilpemspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTphilpem.me.uk              | ViewFinder, 10BaseT Ethernet, 2-slice,
http://www.philpem.me.uk/          | 48xCD, ARCINv6c IDE, SCSI
... A clean desk is a sign of a -sick- min

2005\06\06@090323 by Jinx

face picon face

> I've been a ham since I was 14 and I've always
> held solder in my mouth when I need a third hand.
> It hasn't hurt me any - see attached picture.
> Carey

Ugh - that's the worst "before" picture I've ever seen

2005\06\06@155422 by Carey Fisher - NCS

face picon face
Good one Jinx!!!!!
lmao!!!
Carey

  > -----Original Message-----
  > From: piclist-bouncesspamspam_OUTmit.edu
  > [@spam@piclist-bouncesKILLspamspammit.edu]On Behalf Of Jinx
  > Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 9:03 AM
  > To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
  > Subject: Re: [OT] Solder fumes?
  >
  >
  >
  > > I've been a ham since I was 14 and I've always
  > > held solder in my mouth when I need a third hand.
  > > It hasn't hurt me any - see attached picture.
  > > Carey
  >
  > Ugh - that's the worst "before" picture I've ever seen
  >
  > --

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