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'[OT] Shock the kitty'
2006\02\07@143143 by Robert Young

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>
>
> Pay attention next time, and you'll notice that as you near
> the rear of the cat, its fur will stick to your hand.
>
(changed tag to OT)

I think that means the cat should spend more time grooming.

Reminds me of the joke where the bear asks the rabbit if sh*t sticks to
his fur...

Rob

2006\02\07@144240 by David VanHorn

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On 2/7/06, Robert Young <spam_OUTrwybeakerTakeThisOuTspamhotmail.com> wrote:
>
> >
> >
> > Pay attention next time, and you'll notice that as you near
> > the rear of the cat, its fur will stick to your hand.
> >
> (changed tag to OT)
>
> I think that means the cat should spend more time grooming.
>
> Reminds me of the joke where the bear asks the rabbit if sh*t sticks to
> his fur...


I'm glad I resisted that one..

2006\02\07@172950 by Lindy Mayfield

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I've been experimenting.  This couch we have is the key.  The problem really doesn't occur in other places like on the bed or floor.

I guess I can give up on any fame for having discovered this.  Like when Franklin invented electricity by flying a kite in a storm.  I can give up too on harnessing this energy somehow.  Some Googling has turned up a Van de Graf generator.  


{Original Message removed}

2006\02\07@181658 by Paul James E.

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All,

It's just basic static electricity physics.   Like rubbing a rubber comb
through your hair, and then picking up torn bits of paper with it.  Or
rubbing a piece of glass with a wool cloth.   When your reach the cats
ears, it changes from static electricity to dynamic electricity,
ie ... static discharge.  This whole phenomenon is also known as the
triboelectric effect.

                                            Regards,

                                              Jim



> I've been experimenting.  This couch we have is the key.  The problem
> really doesn't occur in other places like on the bed or floor.
>
> I guess I can give up on any fame for having discovered this.  Like
> when Franklin invented electricity by flying a kite in a storm.  I can
> give up too on harnessing this energy somehow.  Some Googling has
> turned up a Van de Graf generator.  
>
>
> {Original Message removed}

2006\02\07@205928 by James Newtons Massmind
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> a storm.  I can give up too on harnessing this energy
> somehow.  Some Googling has turned up a Van de Graf generator.  
>


Thousands of cats, running under rubber hands then being grabbed by the ears
to release the energy...

...it is truly amazing; the images that flicker through my head some days...

On the other hand we have a long hair cat here that is rather overweight. We
are pretty sure the fur on either side of her butt cheeks rubs together
enough to produce a mild shock every so often... On dry days, she will walk
a ways and then sort of jump a little...

---
James.


2006\02\07@213736 by Bill & Pookie

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Have an Aunt Polly that is on the overly pleasant side, and she does the
same when she walks.  We always thought she was just getting religion.

Bill

{Original Message removed}

2006\02\08@114934 by Bob Barr

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On Wed, 8 Feb 2006 00:29:47 +0200, "Lindy Mayfield" wrote:

>I've been experimenting.  This couch we have is the key.  The problem really doesn't occur in other places like on the bed or floor.
>
>I guess I can give up on any fame for having discovered this.  
> Like when Franklin invented electricity by flying a kite in a storm.  
> I can give up too on harnessing this energy somehow.  Some Googling has turned up a Van de Graf generator.  
>

The trick to getting energy from a cat is very simple and is based on
a couple of known laws:

1. A cat always lands on its feet.

2. Buttered toast always lands buttered-side-down on a carpet.

Based on these two facts, one can affix a piece of buttered toast
(buttered side out) to a cat's back and drop the cat over a carpet.

The following effect will be observed:

As the cat falls toward the floor, it will attempt to land on its
feet. At the same time, the toast will be trying to land
buttered-side-down. An equilibrium will result in which the cat will
be rotating quite rapidly at some small distance above the carpet.
(The exact distance and rotation speed depend primarily on the cat's
weight and height but are also influenced by the cost of the carpet.)

Now it's down to a simple matter of affixing a permanent magnet to the
cat and using its rotating magnetic field to induce current flow in a
nearby coil.


YMMV. :=)


Regards, Bob


P.S. My cat is reading this over my shoulder and he is *not* amused.

2006\02\09@195712 by Harley Shanko

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Reading all about other people's 'kitty' adventures, makes me recall the
several years at Univ. of Colorado, getting my BSEE back in late 50's.  We
had a Siamese cat, named Kitsie by a previous owner.  Come winter dry
weather, her walking across the carpet and sniffing my outheld hand would
draw an arc and a zap, and quickly the cat wouldn't come to 'sniff' any
longer for several months.

Man, you never saw a cat scoot away so fast.  Like a bullet.  But if she
wanted to be held, she'd get on my lap and enjoy being petted.  But don't
try to bring your finger to her nose.  ZAP!

And, if you walked over to the light switch in the dark, you could draw an
arc of several inches at times.  Not really painful, but a nice flash of
light.

Once the dry weather was over, the cat was much more friendly.  Funny cat;
if you were packing up the car to go somewhere, you'd find the cat on top
the front seat back, watching us pack up.  But once moving, she'd start
meowering for hours.  Wanted to go with us, but didn't care for the
movement, I suppose.

Harley

2006\02\10@005628 by Bill & Pookie

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Wow!  That sounds like my Aunt Polly too.  Starting to wonder about that
lady.

Bill

----- Original Message -----
From: "Harley Shanko" <.....HShankoKILLspamspam@spam@OregonsBest.com>
To: <piclistspamKILLspammit.edu>
Sent: Thursday, February 09, 2006 4:58 PM
Subject: RE: [OT] Shock the kitty


{Quote hidden}

> --

2006\02\10@161811 by Lindy Mayfield

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Still laughing (and pondering) this one. (-:

Since it is reproduced also here, http://www.ausmall.com.au/geek/cats.htm , then it must be true.

{Original Message removed}

2006\02\10@163647 by Mark Chauvin

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> The trick to getting energy from a cat is very
> simple and is based on
> a couple of known laws:
>
> 1. A cat always lands on its feet.
>
> 2. Buttered toast always lands buttered-side-down on
> a carpet.

My wife and a friend tried this.  They threw the cat
out the back door with buttered bread strapped on its
back.  The cat tried to land on its feet, but ended up
hitting the ground kind of sideways, let out a wierd
noise, the bread fell off and the cat ran away.  I
think it couldn't twist very good in the air with that
thing on him, and he wasn't too happy about it either.

2006\02\10@165350 by Lindy Mayfield

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That's exactly what I was thinking.  Gravity and friction and all the other annoyances that have plagued perpetual motion for thousands of years.

But in the heart of space with no gravity and no friction, then such a device could be used to power a spaceship.  At least that's what I figured.


{Original Message removed}

2006\02\10@165900 by Danny Sauer

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Mark wrote regarding 'RE: [OT] Shock the kitty' on Fri, Feb 10 at
15:39:
> My wife and a friend tried this.  They threw the cat out the back
> door with buttered bread strapped on its back.  The cat tried to
> land on its feet, but ended up hitting the ground kind of sideways,
> let out a wierd noise, the bread fell off and the cat ran away.

I'm amused by that largely because I can remember, err, imagine the
exact noise the cat made. :)

--Danny, also picturing the irritated face the cat likely made...

2006\02\10@194130 by Howard Winter

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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 13:36:46 -0800 (PST), Mark Chauvin wrote:

>...
> My wife and a friend tried this.  They threw the cat
> out the back door with buttered bread strapped on its
> back.  The cat tried to land on its feet, but ended up
> hitting the ground kind of sideways, let out a wierd
> noise, the bread fell off and the cat ran away.  I
> think it couldn't twist very good in the air with that
> thing on him, and he wasn't too happy about it either.

A friend of mine (coincidentally he's an electonics engineer...) reckons that if you want to throw a cat such
that it can't land on its feet, you have to put backspin on it!  :-)

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\02\10@214047 by William Chops Westfield

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On Feb 10, 2006, at 1:18 PM, Lindy Mayfield wrote:

> The trick to getting energy from a cat is very simple and is based on
> a couple of known laws:
>
> 1. A cat always lands on its feet.
>
There was an article in Scientific American about 1980, studying
the fates of cats who suffered falls from tall buildings.  Interesting
stuff; apparently cats have at least two modes of fall correction, and
there's a danger region in initial altitude where injuries are more
severe; It's too high for "land on your feet mode", and not high
enough for "parachute mode" to come into play.  There's even a name
for the typical pattern of injuries: "High Rise Syndrome."

BillW

2006\02\10@221858 by Sean Schouten

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On 2/11/06, William Chops Westfield <.....westfwKILLspamspam.....mac.com> wrote:
>
> On Feb 10, 2006, at 1:18 PM, Lindy Mayfield wrote:
>
> > The trick to getting energy from a cat is very simple and is based on
> > a couple of known laws:
> >
> > 1. A cat always lands on its feet.
> >
> There was an article in Scientific American about 1980, studying
> the fates of cats who suffered falls from tall buildings.  Interesting
> stuff; apparently cats have at least two modes of fall correction, and
> there's a danger region in initial altitude where injuries are more
> severe; It's too high for "land on your feet mode", and not high
> enough for "parachute mode" to come into play.  There's even a name
> for the typical pattern of injuries: "High Rise Syndrome."
>
> BillW


Parachute mode? That sounds severe! Does that mean that I can throw one out
of an airplane and it will still manage to survive the fall?

Sean

2006\02\11@000140 by William Chops Westfield

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On Feb 10, 2006, at 7:18 PM, Sean Schouten wrote:

> Parachute mode? That sounds severe!
> Does that mean that I can throw one out of an airplane
> and it will still manage to survive the fall?
>
I don't know.  I recommend not letting people find out if you
try it.  IIRC, the idea was that for short falls, the cat merely
gets it's legs pointed downward.  For longer falls, they manage
to sort of spread themselves out in a max-drag sort of arrangement,
rather like skydivers, and extend their legs in a sort of
shock-absorber mode.  (it should be pointed out that though
cats survive long falls from high-rise accidents, they DO wind
up with 'moderate' injuries.  Broken legs/jaws, etc.  The fall
is just a lot less instantly fatal than you might think.)

(I've always wondered whether if you're in a crashing plane, you'd
have a better chance of survival if you jumped out.  I mean, cliff
divers and parachutists in free fall reach similar terminal velocities,
and most of the cliff divers survive...  It ALMOST seems like with
suitable training you ought to be able to leap from a plane and
AIM for something soft...)

BillW

2006\02\11@111707 by Lindy Mayfield

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My friend's cat fell from the top floor of like a 5 or 6 story build in Vienna.  She found it a week later hungry, but otherwise ok.  

{Original Message removed}

2006\02\11@121214 by andrew kelley

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My wife's cat that she used to have, would sit on the 2nd floor
bathroom window sill... Well if you ran up and into the bathroom quick
on occasion he'd fall out the window..  Then he'd be outside crying at
the back door to be let back in.  Also we put down a laminate wood
floor and the cat would slide on it if he was sitting at the top of
the stairs and you ran up the stairs... it was funny.  But alas, she
had to get rid of him.  He didnt like most people but he was great
with kids (very very tolerant).. What cat do you know that you can
pull on its ears and tail and it will just sit there and let you do
it?

andrew

On 2/11/06, Lindy Mayfield <EraseMELindy.Mayfieldspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTssf.sas.com> wrote:
> My friend's cat fell from the top floor of like a 5 or 6 story build in Vienna.  She found it a week later hungry, but otherwise ok.

2006\02\11@121655 by Dave Tweed

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Lindy Mayfield <Lindy.Mayfieldspamspam_OUTssf.sas.com> wrote:
> Sean Schouten wrote:
> > On 2/11/06, William Chops Westfield <@spam@westfwKILLspamspammac.com> wrote:
> > > There was an article in Scientific American about 1980, studying
> > > the fates of cats who suffered falls from tall buildings.  Interesting
> > > stuff; apparently cats have at least two modes of fall correction, and
> > > there's a danger region in initial altitude where injuries are more
> > > severe; It's too high for "land on your feet mode", and not high
> > > enough for "parachute mode" to come into play.  There's even a name
> > > for the typical pattern of injuries: "High Rise Syndrome."
> >
> > Parachute mode? That sounds severe! Does that mean that I can throw one
> > out of an airplane and it will still manage to survive the fall?
>
> My friend's cat fell from the top floor of like a 5 or 6 story build in
> Vienna.  She found it a week later hungry, but otherwise ok.  

Yeah, I read the SciAm article, too. It seems that for the first half
second or so, the cat completes the actions to get upright and extends its
legs fairly rigidly for the landing, which works fine for falls up to about
10 to 15 feet or so. But after about one second, its muscles relax, the
legs spread out, and although it pancakes into the ground pretty hard, it
generally suffers no severe injuries from the landing other than the
occasional chipped teeth, etc. But for falls between 15 and 30 feet, the
cat is transitioning from "rigid" mode to "relaxed" mode, and injuries tend
to be more severe.

-- Dave Tweed

2006\02\13@224004 by Nate Duehr

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William Chops Westfield wrote:

> (I've always wondered whether if you're in a crashing plane, you'd
> have a better chance of survival if you jumped out.  I mean, cliff
> divers and parachutists in free fall reach similar terminal velocities,
> and most of the cliff divers survive...  It ALMOST seems like with
> suitable training you ought to be able to leap from a plane and
> AIM for something soft...)

Went to an FAA Safety Seminar titled "How to Crash an Airplane and
Survive" that discussed doing exactly what you recommend... with the
whole aircraft.

Got a choice of a nice soft stand of aspen trees or a forest of large
pines, and a mountain flying emergency "landing" coming up?  If you
don't panic and actually CHOOSE what you're going to hit, you stand a
much larger chance of surviving it.

Thus the well-worn adage: Fly it until all the parts stop moving!

Nate


2006\02\13@224501 by Peter Todd

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On Mon, Feb 13, 2006 at 08:40:00PM -0700, Nate Duehr wrote:
> William Chops Westfield wrote:
>
> > (I've always wondered whether if you're in a crashing plane, you'd
> > have a better chance of survival if you jumped out.  I mean, cliff
> > divers and parachutists in free fall reach similar terminal velocities,
> > and most of the cliff divers survive...  It ALMOST seems like with
> > suitable training you ought to be able to leap from a plane and
> > AIM for something soft...)
>
> Went to an FAA Safety Seminar titled "How to Crash an Airplane and
> Survive" that discussed doing exactly what you recommend... with the
> whole aircraft.
>
> Got a choice of a nice soft stand of aspen trees or a forest of large
> pines, and a mountain flying emergency "landing" coming up?  If you
> don't panic and actually CHOOSE what you're going to hit, you stand a
> much larger chance of surviving it.
>
> Thus the well-worn adage: Fly it until all the parts stop moving!

So is the fuselage relative to the ground considered a part?

--
KILLspampeteKILLspamspampetertodd.ca http://www.petertodd.ca

2006\02\13@231020 by Nate Duehr

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Peter Todd wrote:

>> Thus the well-worn adage: Fly it until all the parts stop moving!
>
> So is the fuselage relative to the ground considered a part?

Yes, as long as at least one of the movable control surfaces is still
attached!

If you have even just RUDDER left... and everything else has been
sheared off... USE IT, was the point of the safety course.

:-)

Nate

2006\02\14@160232 by Sean Schouten

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On 2/14/06, Nate Duehr <RemoveMEnateTakeThisOuTspamnatetech.com> wrote:
>
>
> Yes, as long as at least one of the movable control surfaces is still
> attached!
>
> If you have even just RUDDER left... and everything else has been
> sheared off... USE IT, was the point of the safety course.


And otherwise you could always revert to the last possible thing on a pilots
mind:

"Ladies and gentleman, this is your  captain speaking. We have just lost all
control of the plane due to a loss of all of our primary and auxiliary
control surfaces. No reason to panic, we've simulated this with M$ flight
simulator set to easy more than a dozen of times... Could 4 people on the
right side of the aircraft please move to the left of the aircraft for a
couple of seconds. Could two of those four people please move down to seat
row one-hundred together with two more people. Could all the first class
passengers please RUN TO THE VERY BACK OF THE AIRCRAFT!!! (...as if their
life depended on it...)"

Reminds me of something a dutch comedian had in his show... extremely funny.

2006\02\14@192931 by olin piclist

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Sean Schouten wrote:
> "Ladies and gentleman, this is your  captain speaking. We have just
> lost all control of the plane due to a loss of all of our primary and
> auxiliary control surfaces. No reason to panic, we've simulated this
> with M$ flight simulator set to easy more than a dozen of times...
> Could 4 people on the right side of the aircraft please move to the
> left of the aircraft for a couple of seconds. Could two of those four
> people please move down to seat row one-hundred together with two more
> people. Could all the first class passengers please RUN TO THE VERY
> BACK OF THE AIRCRAFT!!! (...as if their life depended on it...)"

You left off the rest of the announcement:

"Those of you on the right side of the aircraft will see two parachutes,
those of the pilot and co-pilot.  This is a recording."


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