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'[OT] Sand copper clad board before toner transfer?'
2009\01\28@022230 by solarwind

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I've watched multiple videos on this and haven't come up with an answer yet.

Are you supposed to sand the copper clad board before transferring the
design when making your own PCB? If so, why? If not, why not?

--
solarwind

2009\01\28@105307 by William \Chops\ Westfield

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On Jan 27, 2009, at 11:22 PM, solarwind wrote:

> Are you supposed to sand the copper clad board before transferring the
> design when making your own PCB? If so, why? If not, why not?

The board needs to be VERY clean in order for there to be proper  
adhesion of the resist (and proper etching of the areas without  
resist) but likewise it should not be "rough."  I wouldn't use  
sandpaper, but mildly abrasive cleaners ("comet") and/or pads  
("scotchbrite") seem to be used pretty often...

BillW

2009\01\28@111007 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: spam_OUTpiclist-bouncesTakeThisOuTspammit.edu [.....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu] On
Behalf
> Of William "Chops" Westfield
> Sent: 28 January 2009 15:53
> To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
> Subject: Re: [OT] Sand copper clad board before toner transfer?
>
>
> On Jan 27, 2009, at 11:22 PM, solarwind wrote:
>
> > Are you supposed to sand the copper clad board before transferring
the
> > design when making your own PCB? If so, why? If not, why not?
>
> The board needs to be VERY clean in order for there to be proper
> adhesion of the resist (and proper etching of the areas without
> resist) but likewise it should not be "rough."  I wouldn't use
> sandpaper, but mildly abrasive cleaners ("comet") and/or pads
> ("scotchbrite") seem to be used pretty often...
>

A reasonably fine grit "wet and dry" paper works well, e.g. 600 grit.
AFAIK the main purpose of abrasion is to remove the oxidised surface of
the copper, as grease etc. could be removed by solvents.

Regards

Mike

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2009\01\28@114646 by ncs2004

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At 07:52 AM 1/28/2009 -0800, William \"Chops\" Westfield wrote:
>
>On Jan 27, 2009, at 11:22 PM, solarwind wrote:
>
>> Are you supposed to sand the copper clad board before transferring the
>> design when making your own PCB? If so, why? If not, why not?
>
>The board needs to be VERY clean in order for there to be proper  
>adhesion of the resist (and proper etching of the areas without  
>resist) but likewise it should not be "rough."  I wouldn't use  
>sandpaper, but mildly abrasive cleaners ("comet") and/or pads  
>("scotchbrite") seem to be used pretty often...

When using iron-on toner method (via the blue transfer film), I carefuly
clean the board
with steel-wool, then drop it into etchant for a minute to give it a rough
surface.

Then rinse after the etchant.

The toner seems to flop off a perfectly clean board.



2009\01\28@120408 by Vitaliy

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"Michael Rigby-Jones" wrote:
>> > Are you supposed to sand the copper clad board before transferring
> the
>> > design when making your own PCB? If so, why? If not, why not?
>>
>> The board needs to be VERY clean in order for there to be proper
>> adhesion of the resist (and proper etching of the areas without
>> resist) but likewise it should not be "rough."  I wouldn't use
>> sandpaper, but mildly abrasive cleaners ("comet") and/or pads
>> ("scotchbrite") seem to be used pretty often...
>>
>
> A reasonably fine grit "wet and dry" paper works well, e.g. 600 grit.
> AFAIK the main purpose of abrasion is to remove the oxidised surface of
> the copper, as grease etc. could be removed by solvents.

The main purpose of using sandpaper before doing the transfer is to make the
surface rough so that the toner would stick.

Vitaliy

2009\01\28@120837 by Carl Denk

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face
I don't think I would use steel (FE)wool to clean the board. Fine
particles of steel can get embedded in the copper, and I would think
that would not be good. I use a powdered rust remover, called "ZUD" we
have found it at various home and hardware stores.

ncs2004 wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2009\01\28@192203 by Jake Anderson

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solarwind wrote:
> I've watched multiple videos on this and haven't come up with an answer yet.
>
> Are you supposed to sand the copper clad board before transferring the
> design when making your own PCB? If so, why? If not, why not?
>
>  
I use a nylon scouring pad (the green ones)
and just scrub the board until its "bright"

give it a rinse in hot water and dry it while its hot.
then straight away start with the ironing.

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