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PICList Thread
'[OT] STRIP-X'
2000\04\21@191553 by Wagner Lipnharski

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Hi, different from what the subject can make you think, it comes in a
small 2 fl. oz.  It is not a X stripper, but some kind of jelly (extreme
toxic) that strips the enamel from magnetic wires for soldering
purposes.  I produce this device that use few pieces of magnetic wires
(28 or 30 AWG gage), so it is quite difficult to decape it for
soldering.  I found this STRIP-X from GC Electronics, it works pretty
good, in less than a minute the enamel just detach from the wire where
you apply this jelly thing.  Problem is, it smells like hell, and it is
toxic, label says it is fatal is swallowed or absorbed by the skin.
Every time I open the bottle we need to ventilate the ambient for quite
some time, and seems that the smell stick to carpet, walls, and so on...
nice huh?  Is there any other possible solution to decape the enamel
from magnetic wires without using a blade? we tried even a small flame
(torch), didn't work good.  How they do it in industrial production?
Wagner.

2000\04\21@193309 by Quitt, Walter

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Gosh, right up my ally!
Stick it in a solder pot. Tins and cleans.
The newest method is not to strip it all.
The equipment we make welds it (literally)
directly to the post.  See:
http://www.microjoin.com

GL,
Walt...

{Original Message removed}

2000\04\21@200622 by andy howard

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From: "Wagner Lipnharski" <spam_OUTwagnerTakeThisOuTspamUSTR.NET>


> Every time I open the bottle we need to ventilate the ambient for
quite
> some time, and seems that the smell stick to carpet, walls, and so
on...
> nice huh?  Is there any other possible solution to decape the enamel
> from magnetic wires without using a blade? we tried even a small flame
> (torch), didn't work good.  How they do it in industrial production?


Be careful with burning it, quite a lot of enamelled wire I've seen
recently has had warnings pronted on the reel about toxic fumes if the
coating is burned (we have quite good rules about health labelling here
in Europe these days). It is a nuisance, the old-fashioned types used to
burn off a treat.

I resort to scraping with a scalpel these days, though I have seen a
machine at a company that assembles stuff for one of my clients which
appears to have two revolving abrasive drums. The operator puts the end
of the wire in a hole and turns it slightly and it's cleaned off as
quick as you could want.












.

2000\04\22@045951 by TIM

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when making torroids for dc-dc inverter ,the solder pot works wonders.
i also use a water based organic flux
(easier to wash in hot running water so no flux remover)
for really small job runs i made a small solder pot from
a metal bottle cap attached to the end of an 45 watt solder iron element
as for maximinum heat transfer on the small pot keep direct air flow from
hitting the pot and use a small box muffin fan attached to the end of
flexible laundry dryer vent pipe,(4-5inches diameter)vent out to the window.
hang the other end of the vent tube over the rising solder fumes...
this will suck out the smoke while not cooling the pot too much.....
{Original Message removed}

2000\04\22@142540 by Gabriel Gonzalez

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Yes, I've been at a factory where they make RF filters, and the pot method
is what they use for stripping the enamel.

Gabriel

----- Original Message -----
From: TIM <.....stm800KILLspamspam@spam@CITY-NET.COM>
To: <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Saturday, April 22, 2000 5:57 AM
Subject: Re: [OT] STRIP-X


> when making torroids for dc-dc inverter ,the solder pot works wonders.
> i also use a water based organic flux
> (easier to wash in hot running water so no flux remover)
> for really small job runs i made a small solder pot from
> a metal bottle cap attached to the end of an 45 watt solder iron element
> as for maximinum heat transfer on the small pot keep direct air flow from
> hitting the pot and use a small box muffin fan attached to the end of
> flexible laundry dryer vent pipe,(4-5inches diameter)vent out to the
window.
> hang the other end of the vent tube over the rising solder fumes...
> this will suck out the smoke while not cooling the pot too much.....
> {Original Message removed}

2000\04\22@203722 by rottosen

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Dalbani ( http://www.dalbani.com/ ) has a solder pot made by Solomon
that should work for tinning wires and it only costs about $17 US.  The
solder cup is small, about 1.5 inches diameter by 1.25 inches deep. The
small size probably makes it unsuitable for many other purposes. It
looks like a large soldering iron with a solder pot in place of the tip.
I don't know if its temperature of 450 to 550 degrees C is enough to
strip insulation from magnet wire.

-- Rich


TIM wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2000\04\23@025544 by paulb

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Gabriel Gonzalez wrote:

> Yes, I've been at a factory where they make RF filters, and the pot
> method is what they use for stripping the enamel.

 This is of course based on the use of "self-fluxing" enamel which
first came out under the trade name "biceflux".  Small wire can be
"stripped" by touching the end to a solder blob held on the end of your
iron - once the wire heats to soldering temperature, the insulation
self-strips back, the trick is to actually get the wire to this
temperature.

 Obviously, the solder pot causes maximum contact with the enamel to
heat the wire.

 Understandably, while this suits simple (tuning) inductors,
transformers and other coils made to operate at high temperature may
however use other grades of enamel designed to resist soldering
temperatures.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

2000\04\23@044210 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
Does anyone know where I can buy (in hobbyist quantities) that wire that
used to be available that is explicitly designed to have solding destroy
it's insulation?  IIRC, it was sold for a special tool that could be used
to wrap the (insulated) wire around your IC or socket pins, and then you'd
solder "normally" which would remove the insulations AND solder the joint.
Anything similar would be fine, I guess.

Thanks
Bill W

2000\04\23@045024 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 01:40 AM 4/23/00 PDT, you wrote:
>Does anyone know where I can buy (in hobbyist quantities) that wire that
>used to be available that is explicitly designed to have solding destroy
>it's insulation?  IIRC, it was sold for a special tool that could be used
>to wrap the (insulated) wire around your IC or socket pins, and then you'd
>solder "normally" which would remove the insulations AND solder the joint.
>Anything similar would be fine, I guess.
>

Hi, Bill,

Most magnet wire works like this. IIRC, it's a polyurethane insulation.

When coils are terminated, the wired are just wrapped around the terminals
then the whole thing is dipped into a solder pot to finish the joints
off en masse.

I used to use it for doing prototypes, these days I usually just get a
board made and be done with it (fixes, if I ever made a mistake, ;-)
would use the same wire).

You can get clear, red and green fairly easily. Really old stuff has
a dark red color and is more of an enamel or varnish. That stuff has to be
removed mechanically.

Best regards,


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2000\04\23@163934 by Mark Newland

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Altho the solder pot method works fine for most hobbiest and/or small shops,
it is not really how it is done in some (/most?) larger production areas.
They have a machine with two hard clothlike wheels.  The wheels are touching
each other in a way that if you put a small single wire between them, it
will grab it and spit it out the other side.  The wheels are adjusted just
right to not grab and pull on the wires but just enough to scrape the enamal
off.  Yes, there are finger guards so you fingers can't get sucked into it.

Wagner Lipnharski wrote:

{Quote hidden}


'[OT] STRIP-X'
2000\05\15@104215 by Joe McCauley
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Wagner,

I too have similar problems stripping fine wire (0.032 to 0.055 mm diameter)
I normally use a hot soldering iron and tin the wire. This works eventually,
but
is time consuming and often the wire breaks. I worked in a lab in france
for a while. There they had some stuff which sounds like your Strip-X. There
was no label on the can and no one knew where it came from.
It worked really well though. I used it in a proper fume hood, so the smell
was
not an issue. Dou you have a web address for the company?

Thanks

Joe

{Original Message removed}

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