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'[OT] Re: I am interested in improving my home cell'
2007\11\12@121702 by PicDude

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I also looked into this last year and found many positive reviews for
cellphone repeaters.  They are usually available in two different frequency
ranges, so select the correct one based on your cell carrier's band.  You can
also get some that cover both of those frequency ranges, but price is higher.

Oddly, Radio Shack (if you're in the U.S.) has some good ones at actually
decent prices, and, get ready for a shocker, the Radio Shack sales rep was
actually knowledgeable and helpful about the product.  I guess pigs do fly
after all :-) .  What's even better is that is you order it (as they don't
usually stock these), it is returnable if it does not work well for you.

Cheers,
-Neil.


On Sunday 11 November 2007 21:49, Cedric Chang wrote:
> Is it better to look at an external antenna such as a yagi
> or consider a signal repeater *
>
> Could someone tell me how a cell phone signal repeater works *
>
> Best
>
> Cedric

2007\11\12@132526 by Robert Rolf

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Just be sure that you situate the 'remote' antenna where it CANNOT hear
the repeater antenna, or it may oscillate (feedback) and get you into
heaps of trouble with the Telco (an oscillating repeater can jam a cell site).
I learned of this problem from a telco tech whose job requires he locate
such 'interfering' repeaters. He had some interesting stories about how
many ways people can screw up the installation.

In the USA you can be severely fined for "interfering with
a telecommunication service" if you screw up the install.

Robert


PicDude wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2007\11\12@142648 by Cedric Chang

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>
> On Nov 12, 2007, at 11:25 AM, Robert Rolf wrote:
>
> Just be sure that you situate the 'remote' antenna where it CANNOT  
> hear
> the repeater antenna, or it may oscillate (feedback) and get you into
> heaps of trouble with the Telco (an oscillating repeater can jam a  
> cell site).
> I learned of this problem from a telco tech whose job requires he  
> locate
> such 'interfering' repeaters. He had some interesting stories about  
> how
> many ways people can screw up the installation.
>
> In the USA you can be severely fined for "interfering with
> a telecommunication service" if you screw up the install.
>
> Robert


I was pleased to hear about what a "passive" repeater was.
What I was wondering was..... does an active repeater use
the same frequencies or does it shift them *  I guess if the
cell phone is using a time division protocol , you really can't shift
the frequencies.
Is there anywhere on the internet that describes cell phone
protocols and how a repeater works *

Best
Cedric

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