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'[OT] Rack Mount Specification'
2005\02\21@221251 by Jim Korman

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Ok I've google'd more rack mount equipment et al, etc...

Does anyone know where one might find a specification for
rack mount. I know 19" wide and all that but what about the
actual specs, i.e. thread sizes, etc.

TIA

Jim


2005\02\21@222216 by SavanaPics

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_http://www.server-rack-online.com/server-rack-information.html_
(http://www.server-rack-online.com/server-rack-information.html)

Try here.   About anything ypou need should be listed in the  options here

Eddie Turner, kc4awz

2005\02\21@223937 by Cnc002

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In a message dated 2/21/05 10:14:26 PM Eastern Standard Time,
spam_OUTjkormanTakeThisOuTspamalltel.net writes:

> Ok I've google'd more rack mount equipment et al, etc...
>
> Does anyone know where one might find a specification for
> rack mount. I know 19" wide and all that but what about the
> actual specs, i.e. thread sizes, etc.
>

Try locating Hoffman Enclosure's website or Bud Enclosure's website.  The
manufacturers will usually list the specifications, such as threads etc.

Randy Abernathy

4626 Old Stilesboro Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101
Ph / Fax: 770-974-5295
E-mail: .....cnc002KILLspamspam@spam@aol.com

I furnish technical support, repair, and other related services for your
industrial woodworking machinery. My background as Senior Service Engineer for the
SCMI Group for nearly fifteen years with factory training, combines with my
extensive background in electronics, mechanics, pneumatics, electrical and CNC
machinery to offer you needed support for your machinery.

2005\02\21@231824 by Stephen D. Barnes

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Jim wrote:
> Ok I've google'd more rack mount equipment et al, etc...
>
> Does anyone know where one might find a specification for
> rack mount. I know 19" wide and all that but what about the
> actual specs, i.e. thread sizes, etc.
>
> TIA
>
> Jim

Industry standard thread size is 10-32 for 19" rack rails.
One rack unit is 1.75" high (sometimes called single rack space).
I do not know the dimension between hole centers on the rack rail.

Regards,
Stephen D. Barnes


2005\02\22@004320 by Robert Rolf

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Stephen D. Barnes wrote:

>>Ok I've google'd more rack mount equipment et al, etc...
>>
>>Does anyone know where one might find a specification for
>>rack mount. I know 19" wide and all that but what about the
>>actual specs, i.e. thread sizes, etc.
>>
>>TIA
>>
>>Jim
>
>
> Industry standard thread size is 10-32 for 19" rack rails.
> One rack unit is 1.75" high (sometimes called single rack space).
> I do not know the dimension between hole centers on the rack rail.

1/2"- 5/8" - 5/8" repeating. RU is from center of space in
1/2" gap. 18.3" center to center on verticals.

2005\02\22@042022 by Alan B. Pearce

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>_www.server-rack-online.com/server-rack-information.html_
>(http://www.server-rack-online.com/server-rack-information.html)
>
>Try here.   About anything ypou need should be listed in the  options here

Another one to look at
http://www.argent.com.au/?go=faq gives panel sizes and hole positions.

Also Schroff http://www.schroff.co.uk/internet/html_e/index.html have PDF
files giving useful dimensions. I have used the Multipac unit from this
range.

I did also manage to track down a PDF document from Fujitsu which had a
variety of dimensions for the rack itself, but cannot find a link for it
now.

2005\02\22@043425 by Dan Smith

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On Mon, 21 Feb 2005 23:24:53 -0500, Stephen D. Barnes
<stephenbarnesspamKILLspamhotpop.com> wrote:
> Industry standard thread size is 10-32 for 19" rack rails.

Here in the UK, the captive nuts in the rack rails are M6 thread.

Dan

2005\02\22@140715 by Howard Winter

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Jim,

On Mon, 21 Feb 2005 21:12:38 -0600, Jim Korman wrote:

> Ok I've google'd more rack mount equipment et al, etc...
>
> Does anyone know where one might find a specification for rack mount. I know 19" wide and all that but what
about the actual specs, i.e. thread sizes, etc.

Things I've learned the hard way about 19" racks:

1. The front panel of a rack mounted item is 19" wide.
2. The vertical spacing is quoted in "U" (Rack Units) and 1U is 1.75", but you don't need to know this - just
count in U.
3. Don't rely on anything else!  Some manufacturers (Compaq especially) do their own thing, and act as if
there is no standard involved - as far as they are concerned you use their racks, their servers, and nothing
else!  Others make assumptions that you may not expect - you are assuming that there are standards for all
aspects of a 19" rack - there aren't.
4. The front-to-back spacings are especially variable - a "patch cabinet" will be quite shallow as it's
designed for patch panels, hub/switch/routers, modems, whereas a "server cabinet" will be *much* deeper to
allow servers to be installed.  The variation from deepest to shallowest can be as much as 2:1.
5. Don't assume anything!  Spacing from the front of the rack to the back face of the door may be small - I've
seen them where patch cables plugged into patch panels didn't have room to bend before the door got in the
way, so the door had to be removed.  Similarly there may be no room to run bundles of cables where you want,
and there may be no way for *any* cables to run from in front to behind the front panel, without going between
rack-mounted items (losing you 0.5U and looking awful in the process).
6. Rack suppliers can be terribly unhelpful when it comes to finding out the nitty-gritty of their designs - I
don't know why...
7. However much you think you've cracked it, something is likely to bite you at installation time - don't put
it on the critical path of any project plan if at all possible.
8. Calculating the U spacing is pretty easy to get right, for all other dimensions make sure you have plenty
of space to spare.
9. Having a shelf-mounted keyboard and a clever fold-out TFT screen looks good in the brochures - in Real Life
it's a pain in the bum to use because you have to stand up, and there's nowhere to use a mouse or to put
documents.  Much better to have screen/keyboard/mouse on a desk next to the racks, so you can sit down, use
pieces of paper to refer to and write on, and so on.  Even if someone only does it once a month, it's a right
pain (and for those on the right hand side of the Pond, may contravene EU Working Regulations).
10. Don't assume anything!

Best of luck - I know I needed it every time I got involved in racking...

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2005\02\22@140944 by Vlad

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On Mon, Feb 21, 2005 at 09:12:38PM -0600, Jim Korman wrote:
> Ok I've google'd more rack mount equipment et al, etc...
>
> Does anyone know where one might find a specification for
> rack mount. I know 19" wide and all that but what about the
> actual specs, i.e. thread sizes, etc.

You don't say what kind of gear you will be rack mounting,  but one
thing to keep in mind is telco gear is typically 23".

If you will have mixed equipment in the rack, it might be easier to
get a 23" rack and mount your 19"  with 2" metal brackets.  Although,
unless the gear center mounted, it will not be as stable as if it were
mounted directly to a 19" rack.

-v

2005\02\26@121916 by Jim Korman

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Howard Winter wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Thanks to everyone who responded. I finally found the actual spec,
off an EBay auction item, go figure.

Anyway the spec is EIA RS-310C, the document is available from
Global Engineering Documents (all 24 pages) for the sum of $52US
paper or PDF.

 http://global.ihs.com/

and use EIA-310 for the document search.

Jim Korman






'[OT] Rack Mount Specification'
2005\03\03@085639 by Nate Duehr
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Jim Korman wrote:
> Ok I've google'd more rack mount equipment et al, etc...
>
> Does anyone know where one might find a specification for
> rack mount. I know 19" wide and all that but what about the
> actual specs, i.e. thread sizes, etc.

Jim,

I saw that you found some documentation, but another place to poke
around through is here:

http://www.chatsworth.com/catalog/

If you can get them to send you a paper copy of their mini catalog, it's
nice for reference.

They've got open racks, closed racks, "pretty foo-foo racks" (stupid
plexiglass pretty things that bosses always want but are bloody useless
in the real world), etc.

Cooper/B-line also makes similar enclosed cabinets and their stuff is
popular...

http://www.b-line.com/CommData/index.asp

And the accessories are a-plenty from both.  If you go nuts with
accessories, you can double the cost of the cabinet, really.

Right now the cabinets I've been stuffing for a project at work have
tended toward using the B-Line cabinets that are 23" or more wide but
have solid zinc alloy 4-post rails that are "angle-iron" shaped and fill
in the extra width so 19" gear mounts in them.  The reason is that then
there's PLENTY of room at the sides even with all the doors on to run
big bundles of cabling, and they can be attached to the frame itself via
whatever method you prefer... (tie-wraps, 9-cord with fiber paper,
whatever...).  Everyone always forgets cable space.

Everyone forgets grounding too, if they need it.  Think about where
you'll mount copper bus bars or whatever you might need.  Some people
like to ground to the cabinet posts -- watch out for dissimilar metals
and get some No-Ox or similar involved if needed.

Solid metal cabinets with removable doors and sides are helpful when
stuffing, and then can be sealed up pretty tight, with options for fans
at the top from many suppliers.  (Everyone forgets about cooling too.)

Some areas of the world need cabinets built a little tougher for seismic
activity... most are designed to simply hold in whatever falls down when
the rack screws shear off.  If you go with these, watch out for floor
loading issues and think about how you'll get them in the door and
around the place -- they're heavy beasts.  (Buying nice cabinets and
then tearing up half the carpet with a pallet jack isn't a way to have a
 happy customer.)

There are a lot of racks out there nowadays, all made differently and of
different quality.  Don't cheap out... you'll regret it.

Oh and whoever mentioned the racks with the captive nuts... ARGH!!!
Those things are a giant pain except in one area... if you strip out one
of the pre-tapped holes in a non-captive-nut type of rack, you'll curse
yourself, but the captive nuts are more trouble than they're worth,
usually.  Avoid them... they're evil.

Someone mentioned the depth from the door(s) to the frame rails -- this
is important.  The easiest solution is to buy cabinets that have sliders
and captive nuts and bolts that allow all four posts to be moved fore
and aft to adjust for whatever equipment you're putting into them (and
how much room you need in front/back for cabling.  Don't mess with
cabinets that allow side-to-side shifting of the rails though, they'll
make you crazy.  (Getting them lined up evenly is a chore in ALL of the
movable varieties, and you can spend considerable time with a tape
measure and a socket wrench fiddling around getting the rails in the
right place only to find you did it wrong after you have two or three
pieces of gear in the rack -- make a drawing and stick to it!)

Oh and I have seen one other "nifty" feature... no one plans for enough
space to swing the doors in many cabinet rows.  Or if you get the door
open (barely), you block that row from passing humans and other
equipment until you're done or you do the cabinet row tango every time
someone comes down the row.  A friend has a surplus cabinet from his
company that has two half-doors that open opposite directions in the
front, and is built very nicely.  I keep meaning to go look at it again
and see who made it.  Most of the time on big four-poster cabinets, when
I'm working on stuff inside, I remove the ground wire to the door (if
one exists) and lift the door off the pegs and set it aside when
working, then put it back on later.  If you can't do that, move on to a
design that will allow it unless you're going for ultra-security.

And finally, speaking of ultra-security -- every cabinet ships with
10-15 keys, and they're all pretty much the same.  I have a small
keyring of cabinet keys that'll open +90% of the cabinets out there.  If
you're in an environment where you want more security, re-key the
cabinets.  More, get cabinets with pre-punched holes for your own locks.
  And still more, just buy a bracket for a shed lock, and put padlocks
on them, top and bottom with hard to remove fasteners on the shed hinge.

Hope that helps, there's probably more thoughts about cabinets in my
brain than usual -- I just put together a large system of telco
equipment in eight cabinets, including shipping them via FedEx in large
pine crates to their final destination.  (That is one BIG shipping bill
I'm glad I'm not paying!)

--
Nate Duehr, .....nateKILLspamspam.....natetech.com

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