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'[OT] Proper billing procedures'
2004\09\11@223030 by Aaron G.

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I just picked up my first real sideline project to occupy all my spare
time and generate some extra cash.  I will be automating two machines
used in the injection molding business.  (No PICs involved -- just a
couple of cheap PLCs controlling a handful of I/O points.)

My question involves billing.  We agreed on 10% up front, 20% at design
complete, 30% at build complete, and the final 40% 30 days later.   What
is the standard way that I should handle this?  Do I need to go ahead and
send them a bill for the first 10%, or does cutting a PO automatically
get the first check on it's way to me?

Aaron

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2004\09\11@233827 by Josh Koffman

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I can't speak for their company, but for our company, us cutting a PO
indicates we want something from you. Then you send it to us and bill
us, and we pay.

I'd go ahead and bill them. At the very least it could be viewed as a
gentle reminder.

Josh
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On Sat, 11 Sep 2004 22:25:46 -0400, Aaron G. <spam_OUTcontrolsdude2000TakeThisOuTspamjuno.com> wrote:
> I just picked up my first real sideline project to occupy all my spare
> time and generate some extra cash.  I will be automating two machines
> used in the injection molding business.  (No PICs involved -- just a
> couple of cheap PLCs controlling a handful of I/O points.)
>
> My question involves billing.  We agreed on 10% up front, 20% at design
> complete, 30% at build complete, and the final 40% 30 days later.   What
> is the standard way that I should handle this?  Do I need to go ahead and
> send them a bill for the first 10%, or does cutting a PO automatically
> get the first check on it's way to me?
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2004\09\12@113611 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
> My question involves billing.  We agreed on 10% up front, 20% at design
> complete, 30% at build complete, and the final 40% 30 days later.   What
> is the standard way that I should handle this?  Do I need to go ahead and
> send them a bill for the first 10%, or does cutting a PO automatically
> get the first check on it's way to me?

My experience is that timely and accurate billing is a part of creating my
clients' perception of me as well-organized and reliable. Don't expect to
receive any payment without first sending out an invoice. Send it out when
the associated service has been completed, and state clearly the payment
terms on the invoice (even if they are already in the contract). This not
only helps you, it also helps the client. And the good clients recognize
that and appreciate it.

Many contractors seem to treat billing and other administrative tasks as
something secondary -- but if you think about it, it's the most important
activity... :)

Gerhard
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2004\09\12@115253 by Dave VanHorn

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face

>
>Many contractors seem to treat billing and other administrative tasks as
>something secondary -- but if you think about it, it's the most important
>activity... :)

Any tips on what software works well to manage this sort of thing?

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2004\09\12@120728 by redtock8

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face
I use Quick Books
Al
----- Original Message -----
From: "Dave VanHorn" <.....dvanhornKILLspamspam@spam@dvanhorn.org>
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <piclistspamKILLspammit.edu>
Sent: Sunday, September 12, 2004 11:52 AM
Subject: Re: [OT] Proper billing procedures


{Quote hidden}

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2004\09\12@122439 by Robert Young

picon face
>
> >
> >Many contractors seem to treat billing and other administrative tasks as
> >something secondary -- but if you think about it, it's the most important
> >activity... :)
>
> Any tips on what software works well to manage this sort of thing?


Bill early, bill often and use QuickBooks :-)

Unless you need to track inventory, you can use QB, not QBpro.  There are a
few feature in QBpro that I would have liked to have but I have really
gotten my money's worth out of QB.

Rob Young
.....rwyoungKILLspamspam.....ieee.org
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2004\09\13@071720 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
>>Many contractors seem to treat billing and other administrative tasks as
>>something secondary -- but if you think about it, it's the most important
>>activity... :)
>
> Any tips on what software works well to manage this sort of thing?

I use Quicken H&B. Basically works ok for these purposes (and a bit cheaper
than QuickBooks), even though I would like to use a "real" accounting
program (with double bookkeeping). And I'd like to get away from Intuit
(because of their attitude).

The other day I did some research about open source accounting programs,
and there seem to be a few for small businesses that look fairly stable.
None of them fit my requirement of handling multiple currencies, so I
dropped the idea. And it seemed that you need to spend more time
configuring those programs for your needs, while the Intuit programs work
mostly out of the box.

Gerhard
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