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'[OT] Pliable Plastic Pipe'
2004\08\28@133946 by jayhanson

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Has anyone worked with heating and bending plastic pipe (say, 3/4" ID)?

After it's bent, it won't have to withstand heat or be very strong. What
kind of pipe (e.g., PCV) might work best?

Jay

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2004\08\28@175555 by Denny Esterline

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> Has anyone worked with heating and bending plastic pipe (say, 3/4" ID)?
>
> After it's bent, it won't have to withstand heat or be very strong. What
> kind of pipe (e.g., PCV) might work best?
>
> Jay
>

It's been a while but I've done some work with bending plastic electrical
conduit (grey PVC).

I used a propane torch, though I'd recommend against it if you have another
option. It was too easy to scorch and char the plastic. But if you're
careful and keep the flame moving and take your time (think 5-10 minutes)

I think a heat gun might be a better choice. I used to use one to shape 1/4
inch Plexiglas.

I've also seen "professionals" with an electric oven bending much larger
(6") pipe.

I don't think that the heat/cool cycle changes the plastic significantly,
as long as you don't scorch it.

-Denny


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2004\08\28@183735 by Hopkins

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Electricians use bending springs, available in different sizes at
electrical wholesales, inside the pipe at the point to be bent so that
the pipe does not kink. I have done this using PVC pipe. Ok to about 70
degrees - you can go all the way to 90 but not good for pulling wires
over long distances.

Good for creating sweep bends.
_______________________________________
Roy
Tauranga
New Zealand
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> Has anyone worked with heating and bending plastic pipe (say, 3/4"
ID)?
>
> After it's bent, it won't have to withstand heat or be very strong.
What
> kind of pipe (e.g., PCV) might work best?
>
> Jay
>



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2004\08\28@192258 by jayhanson

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Thanks for the pointers guys!

Later,
Jay

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2004\08\28@202207 by Engineering Info
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Humm, never heard of bending springs but interested at getting a couple
and playing with them.  I've always just filled the pipes with sand
before heating which has worked for me in the past.  Works most of the
time if I'm patient enough.

Hopkins wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2004\08\29@060112 by Denny Esterline

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Can't say I've seen the springs used on plastic pipe, or on the inside for
that matter. But I've used them on the outside of copper tubing with some
success.

Patience is definitely crucial :o)

-Denny


{Quote hidden}

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2004\08\29@063510 by Brent Brown

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> Has anyone worked with heating and bending plastic pipe (say, 3/4"
> ID)?
>
> After it's bent, it won't have to withstand heat or be very strong.
> What kind of pipe (e.g., PCV) might work best?

Try this one for fun...if you soak PVC pipe in acetone it absorbs the acetone
and expands. It goes very flexible like rubber.

Its been a long time since I played with this but I think it takes anywhere from
a couple of hours to a whole day submerged in acetone to fully soften the
PVC. Then some days to shrink again and "dry out". Normal properties of
PVC seem to return, eg hardness. Shapes can be formed but have to held
during the evaporation stage. Can't remember if heating helped the drying
out process but guess it will.

Remember the dangers of handling Acetone, especially inhalation and fire
hazard, and drying out of skin.

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2004\08\29@111355 by David P Harris

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Hi-
I have bend 1/2 inch PVC pipe with a heat gun (kind used to strip
paint), under the instruction of an electrician.  Heat well about 6
inches of pipe before trying to bend it.  The trick is to be patient and
wait until it is quite soft.  I was making about 6 inch 90 degree
corners to pull wire though for some outside 120V wiring.
David

Denny Esterline wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2004\08\29@124953 by Peter van Hoof

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I did not follow the entire thread so I don't know if this was suggested
yet.
If you don't have one of the bendind springs to fill the inside you might
want to fill the pipe with sand.
Also I have done cold bending of thin wall pvc (the kind used in europe for
electrical wiring) with just a bending tool

Peter


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'[OT] Pliable Plastic Pipe'
2004\09\02@001107 by Michael O'Donnell
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Another way to do it is with boiling water... if your part will fit into a
pot. It can be a nice way to go because you don't get local hot-spots where
it burns.

At 02:59 PM 8/28/2004, you wrote:


{Quote hidden}

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