Searching \ for '[OT] Pics in Space (was Second person plural)' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/microchip/devices.htm?key=pic
Search entire site for: 'Pics in Space (was Second person plural)'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT] Pics in Space (was Second person plural)'
1999\10\07@194946 by Randy Brumbaugh

flavicon
face
At 12:08 AM 10/7/99 PST, you wrote:
>um, dont you need special permission from microchip to use pics for
>medical devices or military use?

I always wondered about this . . .
It seems like all IC manufacturers have similar warnings-- you can't use
their parts "as critical components in life support systems" without
"express written approval by Microchip."

I know this smells of lawyers. . .but does anyone ever really get this
permission?  Would they give it if asked?

I always assumed no one actually did seek permission, but that this was
supposed to form a legal shield for Microchip et al.  If a part failure
does kill someone, and they are sued, they can claim the use was
specifically unauthorized.

Anyone here ever try to get this permission?  Or know of any lawsuits where
this was the defense?

1999\10\07@223020 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>Anyone here ever try to get this permission?  Or know of any lawsuits where
>this was the defense?

My own experience:

The goal is to force the implementer to have in place adequate insurance in
case the product fails.  It is a safeguard to prevent Microchip (or
whomever) from being held liable.  You need to get written permission,
which points that the implementer (you and me) is assuming full liability,
holding the mfg harmless.

Naturally, the end result is that only people who can afford to pay huge
sums to the insurance companies get a license.  Not folks like me.

Which is why there are lots of good medical products not on the market.
And why those that are are so costly.

Andy

==================================================================
Eternity is only a heartbeat away - are you ready?  Ask me how!
------------------------------------------------------------------
spam_OUTandyTakeThisOuTspamrc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
.....andyKILLspamspam@spam@montanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\10\08@121034 by Harold M Hallikainen

picon face
On Thu, 7 Oct 1999 16:47:25 -0700 Randy Brumbaugh <brumbaugspamKILLspamPACBELL.NET>
writes:
{Quote hidden}

       I haven't tried this, but a manufacturer could have a "medical
grade" device that is actually their highest quality device.  The
purchaser of the medical grade device pays for this high quality
(determined through extensive testing) AND the insurance policy the chip
manufacturer has to take out to cover the possibility of being sued.

Harold



Harold Hallikainen
.....haroldKILLspamspam.....hallikainen.com
Hallikainen & Friends, Inc.
See the FCC Rules at http://hallikainen.com/FccRules and comments filed
in LPFM proceeding at http://hallikainen.com/lpfm

___________________________________________________________________
Get the Internet just the way you want it.
Free software, free e-mail, and free Internet access for a month!
Try Juno Web: dl.http://www.juno.com/dynoget/tagj.

1999\10\08@134520 by Robert M. McClure

flavicon
face
At 04:47 PM 10/7/99 -0700, Randy Brumbaugh wrote:
>At 12:08 AM 10/7/99 PST, you wrote:
>>um, dont you need special permission from microchip to use pics for
>>medical devices or military use?
>
>I always wondered about this . . .
>It seems like all IC manufacturers have similar warnings-- you can't use
>their parts "as critical components in life support systems" without
>"express written approval by Microchip."
>
>I know this smells of lawyers. . .but does anyone ever really get this
>permission?  Would they give it if asked?
>
>I always assumed no one actually did seek permission, but that this was
>supposed to form a legal shield for Microchip et al.  If a part failure
>does kill someone, and they are sued, they can claim the use was
>specifically unauthorized.
>
>Anyone here ever try to get this permission?  Or know of any lawsuits where
>this was the defense?
>
Haven't tried Microchip in particular, but I do know that substantially all
semiconductor companies specifically forbid such usage without permission,
which they will almost never give.  A few will permit usage in some medical
applications with suitable indemnification.  Almost none will permit usage
in implantable (inside the body) applications.  This does put a major
roadblock in the path of progress in medical applications.  This is one of
the reasons why such devices as pacemakers are blindlingly expensive and
lag years behind the state-of-the-art.

In experimental usage, the admonishment is by and large ignored, and everybody
concerned pretends that they have no idea what is going on.  The semiconductor
company maintains that they did not authorize such usage and the company doing
the experiment stands behind the experimental shield in which they get their
subjects (if human) to waive their rights to any and everything.

Another victory for the lawyers.

Bob McClure

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1999 , 2000 only
- Today
- New search...