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'[OT] My Time Capsule'
2003\11\10@104142 by Martin McCormick

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Mauricio Jancic writes:
>Added TAG:
>
>        can I ask you, since english is not my native thongue: Are you
>really blind or is just a form of expresion. If you are, how do you
>manege to assembly circuit in the breadboard, protoboard or the way that
>you call it.?

       Yes. I really am.  I can see bright Sun or photo strobes,
really bright lightning and probably nuclear war, but that's about it.

       I keep a Braille notebook of pin-outs of chips I use in
projects and use perforated board and wire-wrap as well as solder
connections to connect wires to round component leads.  Many chips
have a notch or little pin-prick dot at Pin 1 and a number of
wire-wrap sockets have something, either a notch, a bobbed corner, or
maybe even a logo stamped in to the plastic on the Pin1 end.  The two
most important things are to
be sure to keep all the IC's in carefully-marked boxes or their
shipping tubes because they sure all look the same to me when I don't
know what they are.

       The one monster I haven't even begun to tame is the
surface-mount technology.  One can use a wire-wrap pin nest and socket
if such a thing can be found for a given chip, but they are
_EXPENSIVE_ and only practical for large IC's.  A lot of those
surface-mount parts feel like grains of sand to me.

       I know I must make PIC's work for the same reason that anyone
involved in electronics wants to use them.  Less packaging, smaller
projects, and greater ease of duplicating the same circuit if one
needs to.

       Also, for me, documentation of what I did can be put right in
to the PIC program in the form of comments and stored for later use if
necessary.

       Your English is much better than my Spanish and Spanish
through the speech synthesizer I presently use doesn't come out right
because the synthesizer expects English rules so I have to slowly
spell out Spanish words to work my way through a Spanish message.

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2003\11\10@105352 by Mauricio Jancic

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I once have a eye burn becouse I made some work soldering (electric
soldering) with out the mask and I get really burn and couldn’t see
much, so, my doctor, told me to wait to see what happened, but
fortunatly all turn out fine and I can see now as I saw befere.

       During that blind week, I thought how would I work in this
bussines beeing blind. In the hardware part, I imagine what you just
explain to me, but in the software, I thought that it might be lot
different than know, (I guess) since now, I can "take a look" at the
code, see the C structures graphically, and that stuff, but I guess that
beeing blind you have to read line by line and "imagine" the structures
in your head, wich, by the way, must have a big "memory" to store full
structures....

Well, keep on the good work.
Bye

Mauricio Jancic
Janso Desarrollos
Microchip Consultant
(54) - 11 - 4542 - 3519

>>{Original Message removed}

2003\11\10@164830 by Philip Pemberton

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In message <003a01c3a7a2$9230ad30$0201a8c0@janso>
         Mauricio Jancic <spam_OUTjancicTakeThisOuTspamARNET.COM.AR> wrote:

> I once have a eye burn becouse I made some work soldering (electric
> soldering) with out the mask and I get really burn and couldn’t see
> much, so, my doctor, told me to wait to see what happened, but
> fortunatly all turn out fine and I can see now as I saw befere.
I nearly ended up in the same situation. I was tinning some wires and as the
tip moved away from the end of the wire, the wire sprang back into its
original shape, sending a piece of solder flying towards my eyes. Thankfully,
I had my glasses on at the time - now there's a flux stain on them, as well
as a section of melted plastic near the rim.
Stupid mistake made, lesson learned...
I won't even start on the number of times I've gained skin burns from the
soldering iron. I once had one of those cheap "Made in China" soldering irons
*explode*. Sent shrapnel everywhere - thankfully I was out of the room at the
time. Made a real mess of the fridge-freezer. :-/

Later.
-- Phil.                              | Acorn Risc PC600 Mk3, SA202, 64MB, 6GB,
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2003\11\10@172833 by Jinx

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> I won't even start on the number of times I've gained skin burns
> from the soldering iron

I stopped trying to catch mine when it drops a long time ago. Just
grab it on the first bounce now

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2003\11\10@173704 by Tony Nixon

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Jinx wrote:
>
> > I won't even start on the number of times I've gained skin burns
> > from the soldering iron
>
> I stopped trying to catch mine when it drops a long time ago. Just
> grab it on the first bounce now
>

I had bare feet one day at home and dropped mine. It landed between my
toes :-(

Tony

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2003\11\10@175951 by Jinx

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> > > I won't even start on the number of times I've gained skin burns
> > > from the soldering iron
> >
> > I stopped trying to catch mine when it drops a long time ago. Just
> > grab it on the first bounce now
> >
>
> I had bare feet one day at home and dropped mine. It landed between
> my toes :-(
>
> Tony

Hopefully not the two big toes ?

(Cue Young Ones - <swing of basebal bat> "Ha, missed both my legs !")

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2003\11\10@181234 by David VanHorn

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>
>I had my glasses on at the time - now there's a flux stain on them, as well
>as a section of melted plastic near the rim.

Every time I go for glasses, I have to explain all over again, why polycarbonate is unacceptable.  I deliberately use oversized lenses. they've saved me from grinder chips, solder splashes, metal shavings etc.

When they do the lens busting demo, I just tell them that I don't plan to let anyone mount a lens buster on my face anytime soon.
It's actually fairly hard to bust the lenses while they are on your face, especially in wire frames.

They do make more money on the polycarbonates though, especially with the "UV coating" that stops the UV that doesn't pass through glass anyway. (short wave UV)

>Stupid mistake made, lesson learned...
>I won't even start on the number of times I've gained skin burns from the
>soldering iron.

Never grab a falling soldering iron. :)

>I once had one of those cheap "Made in China" soldering irons
>*explode*. Sent shrapnel everywhere - thankfully I was out of the room at the
>time. Made a real mess of the fridge-freezer. :-/

Exploding solder irons?

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2003\11\10@214322 by Mike Hord

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>I won't even start on the number of times I've gained skin burns from the
>soldering iron.

My first ever lesson in lab/desk safety came in high school, when I stuck
the
handle end of a soldering iron in my mouth and reached to the left with my
right hand.  When I could find what I was looking for, I turned my head to
look over and stuck the iron into the back of my left hand.

I naturally opened my mouth to, ah, loudly express my displeasure with the
situation, which sent the iron tumbling into my lap.

Lesson learned.

Mike H.

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2003\11\10@221720 by Russell McMahon

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> >I won't even start on the number of times I've gained skin burns from the
> >soldering iron.

This is an unlikely sounding but true story:

It was long long ago.
I was working on a motorcycle in our basement.
I was using two soldering irons.
Both were lying on the concrete workshop floor.

My brother entered.
He had bare feet.
He stood on a soldering iron.
He leapt back, grabbed one foot and hopped across the workshop on one leg.
He hopped onto the other iron.

His subsequent attempts to hop while holding two feet were not overly
successful :-)

It took me a while to live that incident down.
I'm not sure what lessons he learnt from it..



       Russell McMahon

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2003\11\10@233742 by Mauricio Jancic

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I get used (don’t know why) to take the solder iron to my mouth (2 cm
near the lips) to see if it's hot. One day, While aproaching the iron to
the mouth, the cable stuck with something and the back of the iron stop
moving and only the tip continue, but as it was stoped by the cable, it
moved faster until it reach my lips: conclusion:
" Human flesh, when iron burned, smells like hamburger"

Don’t know why, but keep testing temperature with my lips....

Mauricio

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2003\11\11@081209 by Bob Ammerman

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> Never grab a falling soldering iron. :)

When young, I had a habit of picking up a soldering iron by pinching the
handle between the first two fingers of my left hand.

One day, a friend and I were sitting in my driveway, building a flip-flop
out of a 12AU7A vacuum tube. I reached down to pick up the soldering iron,
without looking, and instead of pinching the handle, I got my fingers
astraddle the barrel. After some screaming (extra loud, since I don't swear
and couldn't express myself that way), I decided right then and there to
change the way I handled soldering irons.

Since then, I haven't receive any more significant burns in the last 30
years or so.

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems

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2003\11\11@094333 by Tom Stamm

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From an old opamp book by Smith,
" A soldering iron has two ends, which differ markedly in the degree of
comfort with which they can be grasped. "

I used to have a moustache. Really smelly when you try to test heat with
your lips...

Tom Stamm

Mike Hord wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2003\11\11@100031 by llile

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In our high school electronics lab there was this kid named Gieske. Gieske
had a 'fro, which was in style at the time but was really an excuse to
have a big mess of uncombed hair on his head. (for those unfamiliar with
this style, think about how long hair would look if it was teased and left
uncombed ever after)  Gieske was often caught sleeping in the back of the
lab and the teacher would have to wake him up.  But one day he got the
message louder than usual.  He fell asleep with his mop of hair sitting on
a soldering iron.  The hair was so thick and unkempt that it insulated his
head nicely, and just sat there smouldering for a while.  He finally woke
up when we were all saying "What's that smell?" and looking for the fire.
His hair, however, didn't look much different than usual even with a big
hunk of it fried off.


-- Lawrence Lile





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Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <PICLISTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
11/10/2003 08:42 PM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


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       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [OT] My Time Capsule


>I won't even start on the number of times I've gained skin burns from the
>soldering iron.

My first ever lesson in lab/desk safety came in high school, when I stuck
the
handle end of a soldering iron in my mouth and reached to the left with my
right hand.  When I could find what I was looking for, I turned my head to
look over and stuck the iron into the back of my left hand.

I naturally opened my mouth to, ah, loudly express my displeasure with the
situation, which sent the iron tumbling into my lap.

Lesson learned.

Mike H.

_________________________________________________________________
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playing
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http://join.msn.com/?page=offers/premiumradio

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2003\11\11@103804 by Ian McLean

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Any of you ever dropped a blob of molten solder onto your skin ?

I did this a few years ago when soldering some heavy guage high current wire
for a power supply and dropped a sizable blob of molten solder onto my
exposed thigh.  I tried to brush the solder off, but of course the solder
was still semi-molten, so I managed to burn my fingers as well as smear the
blob over a larger surface area of my leg.  Nothing to do except wait for
the solder the harden.  After 30 seconds of burning agony, I peeled the
solidified solder off my thigh, along with the top few layers of skin to
reveal a nice second degree burn.  It took several weeks to heal.  Been very
careful not to repeat that trick again ;)

Rgs
Ian

{Original Message removed}

2003\11\11@104843 by Marcel van Lieshout

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So, next to safety glasses, we need a complete safety suit incl. gloves and
boots! Never knew this work was so dangerous ;-)

Marcel

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ian McLean" <RemoveMEianmmTakeThisOuTspamOPTUSNET.COM.AU>
To: <spamBeGonePICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, November 11, 2003 4:37 PM
Subject: Re: [OT] My Time Capsule


> Any of you ever dropped a blob of molten solder onto your skin ?
>
> I did this a few years ago when soldering some heavy guage high current
wire
> for a power supply and dropped a sizable blob of molten solder onto my
> exposed thigh.  I tried to brush the solder off, but of course the solder
> was still semi-molten, so I managed to burn my fingers as well as smear
the
> blob over a larger surface area of my leg.  Nothing to do except wait for
> the solder the harden.  After 30 seconds of burning agony, I peeled the
> solidified solder off my thigh, along with the top few layers of skin to
> reveal a nice second degree burn.  It took several weeks to heal.  Been
very
> careful not to repeat that trick again ;)
>
> Rgs
> Ian
>
> {Original Message removed}

2003\11\11@110505 by Edward Gisske

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Ian...
Put your pants on the next time you decide to solder big wires.....
Ed
----- Original Message -----
From: "Marcel van Lieshout" <TakeThisOuTmarcelEraseMEspamspam_OUTHMCS.NL>
To: <RemoveMEPICLISTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, November 11, 2003 9:48 AM
Subject: Re: [OT] My Time Capsule


> So, next to safety glasses, we need a complete safety suit incl. gloves
and
{Quote hidden}

solder
> > was still semi-molten, so I managed to burn my fingers as well as smear
> the
> > blob over a larger surface area of my leg.  Nothing to do except wait
for
> > the solder the harden.  After 30 seconds of burning agony, I peeled the
> > solidified solder off my thigh, along with the top few layers of skin to
> > reveal a nice second degree burn.  It took several weeks to heal.  Been
> very
> > careful not to repeat that trick again ;)
> >
> > Rgs
> > Ian
> >
> > {Original Message removed}

2003\11\11@110712 by David VanHorn

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At 04:48 PM 11/11/2003 +0100, Marcel van Lieshout wrote:

>So, next to safety glasses, we need a complete safety suit incl. gloves and
>boots! Never knew this work was so dangerous ;-)

I think you could sell chainmail gauntlets to the guys who build PCs.
I saw a guy cut his finger to the bone on one of those stamped edges once.

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2003\11\11@112923 by Ian McLean

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Hi Edward,

Good advice !  Just to be clear, I WAS wearing shorts.  (I live in Australia
and this was in summertime).  I don't want to give people the idea I'm some
sort of kinky electronics person ;-)

I know I am partly to blame for perpetuating it, but has this thread
wandered several light years off-topic from the original post, or what ?

Rgs
Ian.

{Original Message removed}

2003\11\11@112924 by Mike Hord

picon face
>Any of you ever dropped a blob of molten solder onto your skin ?
>
A few weeks ago I managed to drop a blob of solder into my shoe
between the sock and the shoe.  I don't think a shoe has ever
been removed faster, anywhere.  Thankfully, the sock took the
brunt of the damage.

Mike H.

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2003\11\11@120040 by Herbert Graf

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> > Never grab a falling soldering iron. :)
>
> When young, I had a habit of picking up a soldering iron by pinching the
> handle between the first two fingers of my left hand.
>
> One day, a friend and I were sitting in my driveway, building a flip-flop
> out of a 12AU7A vacuum tube. I reached down to pick up the soldering iron,
> without looking, and instead of pinching the handle, I got my fingers
> astraddle the barrel. After some screaming (extra loud, since I
> don't swear
> and couldn't express myself that way), I decided right then and there to
> change the way I handled soldering irons.
>
> Since then, I haven't receive any more significant burns in the last 30
> years or so.

       Well Bob, then you are NOT a TRUE hobbyist. Like the grease under the
fingernails for a TRUE mechanic scars and blisters from soldering irons are
THE MARK of a TRUE electronics hobbyist! :) Just kidding, I haven't been
burned by mine in a while either. Of course, having said that, I'll probably
have been burned by it (literally) within the next week. Thanks in advance
Bob! :)

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2003\11\11@124020 by M. Adam Davis

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I forget the exact industry but it involved very sharp knives - they
have gloves available which use finely woven metal (and kevlar, now) to
prevent (not get rid of!) cutting accidents.

I work on PC cases all the time, and I rarely pass a week without
getting a cut or two.  Recently one cut so clean and bled so profusely
that I didn't notice it until I came acros my own blood droplets..."Hmm,
it doesn't look like old blood..."  looking carefully at one hand, then
the other, "Ah!  Nice...  Where's my bandaid..."

I never work on the car without getting my knuckles bangs and scraped
though.  Orange clean helps to identify any cuts I didn't notice while I
was working...

-Adam

David VanHorn wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2003\11\11@124229 by Denny Esterline

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> >Any of you ever dropped a blob of molten solder onto your skin ?
> >
> A few weeks ago I managed to drop a blob of solder into my shoe
> between the sock and the shoe.  I don't think a shoe has ever
> been removed faster, anywhere.

Don't be to sure of that, in my younger days I used to arc weld in
sneakers. Solder's bad enough at ~300 degrees, try molting iron at
~2000 degrees!

I think it was a Jeff Foxworthy joke (redneck comedian for you guys
accross the pond) talking about kids getting hurt "Let 'em pull it on
thier head a time or two, the'll learn"

I don't weld in sneakers anymore.  :o)


-Denny

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2003\11\11@124230 by M. Adam Davis

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I've gotten used to the 'fling'.  All you can do with molten solder is
fling the afflicted body part, and hope most of it flies off.  Leg
flings involve jumping up and doing the hokey pokey.

I generally prefer jeans and long sleeves when soldering.

-Adam

Ian McLean wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>{Original Message removed}

2003\11\11@125057 by Hazelwood Lyle

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> >Any of you ever dropped a blob of molten solder onto your skin ?
> >
> A few weeks ago I managed to drop a blob of solder into my shoe
> between the sock and the shoe.  I don't think a shoe has ever
> been removed faster, anywhere.

I worked for a short time in Electronics assembly, and one task
involved tinning the ends of tightly coiled springs in a soldering pot.
(Making antennas for emergency transmitter beacons)
Well, dipping one or two at a time seemed to be less productive than dipping a few dozen at a time. Nobody had warned me that the thermal shock
could cause an eruption of solder. I was lucky to escape with only
spot burns on my face and arms. The solder pot was emptied by the event.

Lyle

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2003\11\11@134218 by Philip Pemberton

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In message <000a01c3a80d$71a0f140$0201a8c0@janso>
         Mauricio Jancic <KILLspamjancicspamBeGonespamARNET.COM.AR> wrote:

> moved faster until it reach my lips: conclusion:
> " Human flesh, when iron burned, smells like hamburger"
Why do you think most firefighters refuse to eat bacon or pork? Seems human
smells remarkably like pork/bacon when cooked. That's hearsay - I don't know
if it's true and I don't want to test it.

> Don’t know why, but keep testing temperature with my lips....
I use the back of my hand - if the soldering iron is hot enough, you can feel
the heat on the outside of the second wire spring on the solder stand.

Later.
-- Phil.                              | Acorn Risc PC600 Mk3, SA202, 64MB, 6GB,
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2003\11\11@151849 by John Ferrell

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Kevlar gloves are available at K-Mart in the fishing supplies. Buy a right
and a left, they are called filet gloves.

Ground black pepper works well as a coagulant. No, it does not hurt...

John Ferrell
6241 Phillippi Rd
Julian NC 27283
Phone: (336)685-9606
spamBeGonejohnferrellspamKILLspamearthlink.net
Dixie Competition Products
NSRCA 479 AMA 4190  W8CCW
"My Competition is Not My Enemy"


{Original Message removed}

2003\11\11@152306 by D. Jay Newman

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> > I forget the exact industry but it involved very sharp knives - they
> > have gloves available which use finely woven metal (and kevlar, now) to
> > prevent (not get rid of!) cutting accidents.

I had a friend who was a butcher who had a chain-mail glove.
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2003\11\11@153307 by William Chops Westfield

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On Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003, at 08:27 US/Pacific, Ian McLean wrote:
>
> I know I am partly to blame for perpetuating it, but has this thread
> wandered several light years off-topic from the original post, or what
> ?
>

yeah.  And the original poster is having to read it in braille.
(or maybe not.  The blind programmer here has this device that
"displays" a
line of text at a time in braille somehow.  But perhaps text-to-speech
has
taken over...)

BillW

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2003\11\11@155427 by Andrew Warren

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William Chops Westfield <.....PICLISTspamRemoveMEmitvma.mit.edu> wrote:

> yeah.  And the original poster is having to read it in braille.

   Martin uses text-to-speech, as far as I know... But even so,
   having to "read" through irrelevant quoted paragraphs and
   headers/footers must be really time-consuming and frustrating.
   Yet another reason for us all to remember to trim the quoted text
   in our replies.

   -Andrew

=== Andrew Warren -- RemoveMEaiwspamspamBeGonecypress.com
=== Principal Design Engineer
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===
=== Opinions expressed above do not
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=== Cypress Semiconductor Corporation

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2003\11\11@170718 by Martin McCormick

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William Chops Westfield writes:
>On Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003, at 08:27 US/Pacific, Ian McLean wrote:
>>
>> I know I am partly to blame for perpetuating it, but has this thread
>> wandered several light years off-topic from the original post, or what
>> ?
>>
>
>yeah.  And the original poster is having to read it in braille.

       No, not quite.

>(or maybe not.  The blind programmer here has this device that
>"displays" a
>line of text at a time in braille somehow.  But perhaps text-to-speech
>has
>taken over...)

       Most blind computer users use speech synthesizers.  In the
first place, it is kind of hard to type and read Braille at the same
time.  Secondly, unless you really need a Braille display, speech is
much, much cheaper.  Some speech synthesizers are nothing more than
software and can, in certain situations, cost nothing such as the
festival application in Linux.

       Other speech boxes are in the $100 to $200 range.  Still
others near $1,000, but the crown jewels for sheer expense are Braille
displays.  How does $5,000 for a 1-liner sound?

       This isn't necessarily folks trying to rip off blind
consumers, either although some of that goes on in the access
industry.  The reason why Braille displays are so hideously expensive
is due to the fact that you somehow have to cram a little solenoid or
piezoelectric reed in to extremely close quarters with others, one for
each dot.

       Nobody has figured out any magic Jello that you could pour in
to a matrix and have the electric charges between rows and columns
cause the magic goo to rise up and form dots.  Unless the goo
contained gold or platinum dust, the need for precision manufacturing
would not be as great and the display would work as long as the stuff
didn't run out.  It also would be less expensive.

       I have read of electrorealogical fluids and thought there
might be something there.  A group in Germany was working on a Braille
screen using that technology, but I never heard anything about a
follow-up.

       Anyway, I have been reading the messages about all the novel
ways people have picked up soldering irons and how little time it
takes to read a soldering iron in Braille.

       I have done a few of those things myself, but nothing really
special.  My favorite soldering tool for little work is one of those
Wahl cordless miniature guns with the smallest tip they sell.  My only
complaint is that they use nicads.  I hate those things.  You can't
live with them and can't live without them.  After a few years, one
is forced to go to the mechanically annoying task of replacing them,
carefully fitting the new ones exactly back in to the place the old
ones occupied without breaking anything, and then disposing of the old
ones in a proper manner.  Actually, this last part has nothing to do
with blind issues, so I am just as guilty of digression as everybody
else.

       I should also probably get back to doing what I am paid to do
so I can buy PICStart Plusses and newer PIC's when I use up what I've got.

       What does the PICStart Plus sell for at this time?

       Remember to pick up your soldering irons on the cord end.

Martin McCormick WB5AGZ  Stillwater, OK
OSU Information Technology Division Network Operations Group

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2003\11\11@181531 by Bob Ammerman

picon face
> Ian...
> Put your pants on the next time you decide to solder big wires.....
> Ed

I remember the solder blobs that used to stick so well in polyester pants.
Trying to pull it out would just make a hole in the pants (which were
typically already half burnt thru by the blob.

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems

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2003\11\11@213836 by Denny Esterline
picon face
>         This isn't necessarily folks trying to rip off blind
> consumers, either although some of that goes on in the access
> industry.  The reason why Braille displays are so hideously
expensive
> is due to the fact that you somehow have to cram a little solenoid
or
> piezoelectric reed in to extremely close quarters with others, one
for
> each dot.
>
>         Nobody has figured out any magic Jello that you could pour
in
> to a matrix and have the electric charges between rows and columns
> cause the magic goo to rise up and form dots.  Unless the goo
> contained gold or platinum dust, the need for precision
manufacturing
> would not be as great and the display would work as long as the
stuff
> didn't run out.  It also would be less expensive.
>
>
That brings up an interesting idea for using SMA (shape memory alloy,
commonly known as muscle-wire) :-)

-Denny

(of course this thread is now even farther off topic ;-)

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2003\11\11@231251 by Martin McCormick

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       I wrote my own screen reader in 8086 assembler and have been
using it with slight modifications since about 1987 or so.  One of the
first things I put in it after getting the basics of just making it
work running pretty well, was a feature I can turn on and off which
looks for the > or | that many-times precedes quoted lines in Email
messages.  If the first character is either of those, no speech is
generated.  When the end of the line is reached, the flag is reset so
it will speak if the next line doesn't have this character as its
first, but the end result is that one can buzz through all the quotes
very fast and only hear the status message which may  say, "more" or
"15%" or whatever the paging application you are using puts at the
bottom.  That makes the quotes very painless.

       The other thing I put in extremely soon after starting to use
this program was a nuisance killer that silences the speech after the
second repeated character for example a line of 80 dashes or stars
or some other thing that is just lovely to hear several hundred times
in arow.  I'm not kidding!

       I override this if the characters are the digits0-9 or a-f or
the letter w because of www.

       Those filters are probably the smartest thing I ever did in
that whole project and the reason why I haven't gone outside and laid
down in front of a stream of heavy traffic.  That kind of stuff can
drive a person batty in minutes.

       The traffic starts looking pretty good, though, when somebody
sends a message and includes 15 or 20 screens worth of names also
receiving a copy.  That is also a massive violation of those people's
privacy, to.  It just seems so dorky.

Andrew Warren writes:
>    Martin uses text-to-speech, as far as I know... But even so,
>    having to "read" through irrelevant quoted paragraphs and
>    headers/footers must be really time-consuming and frustrating.

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2003\11\12@080241 by Jake Anderson

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>Any of you ever dropped a blob of molten solder onto your skin ?

I did once, I had a big blob of solder on the tip of the iron and went to
flick it off like I had a hundred times before, cept this time I flicked the
iron and the solder blob stayed in the same place, a place which was later
occupied by my arm. well needless to say I swiped at the sizzling blob of
solder on my arm stupid thing is I missed the first time. seriously how do
you miss a burning blob of metal on your arm?? I got it the second time
(luckily I didn't stab myself with the solder). but I had the oddest shaped
blister I've ever had, it was a perfect cylinder about 1cm high and half
that across.

now if you really want to burn yourself sugar syrup is the way to go.

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2003\11\12@105257 by llile

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face
Martin,

You must have a devil of a time with spam.

I used to read for a nearly blind guy who was way into computers.  He had
software that would magnify the text so each character would fill the
screen, which he could then read through inch-thick glasses.  However, it
was more efficient to have somebody read it to him.  I, in turn, learned
an awful lot from him so it was a great trade.

-- Lawrence Lile





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Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


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       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [OT] My Time Capsule


       I wrote my own screen reader in 8086 assembler and have been
using it with slight modifications since about 1987 or so.  One of the
first things I put in it after getting the basics of just making it
work running pretty well, was a feature I can turn on and off which
looks for the > or | that many-times precedes quoted lines in Email
messages.  If the first character is either of those, no speech is
generated.  When the end of the line is reached, the flag is reset so
it will speak if the next line doesn't have this character as its
first, but the end result is that one can buzz through all the quotes
very fast and only hear the status message which may  say, "more" or
"15%" or whatever the paging application you are using puts at the
bottom.  That makes the quotes very painless.

       The other thing I put in extremely soon after starting to use
this program was a nuisance killer that silences the speech after the
second repeated character for example a line of 80 dashes or stars
or some other thing that is just lovely to hear several hundred times
in arow.  I'm not kidding!

       I override this if the characters are the digits0-9 or a-f or
the letter w because of www.

       Those filters are probably the smartest thing I ever did in
that whole project and the reason why I haven't gone outside and laid
down in front of a stream of heavy traffic.  That kind of stuff can
drive a person batty in minutes.

       The traffic starts looking pretty good, though, when somebody
sends a message and includes 15 or 20 screens worth of names also
receiving a copy.  That is also a massive violation of those people's
privacy, to.  It just seems so dorky.

Andrew Warren writes:
>    Martin uses text-to-speech, as far as I know... But even so,
>    having to "read" through irrelevant quoted paragraphs and
>    headers/footers must be really time-consuming and frustrating.

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2003\11\12@114804 by Tim Hart

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Snip...
>now if you really want to burn yourself sugar syrup is the way to go.<

AMEN BROTHER!!  My Friend made some of that and the bottle was still hot....the steam built up and when I went to pour it....boom!  It shot a nice line across my arm.....blister was 4 inches long and 2mm wide...it was quite odd...not to mention painful.  
I'm sticking with fresh cool corn syrup fresh from the bottle :)  Nice and thick!!! :)

As a side note....Metallic Sodium burns nicely when it catches fire on your skin (perspiration + carelessness) .....I still have that scar 10 years later!!

Tim

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2003\11\12@120258 by Mauricio Jancic

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Yet another topic here..:

>>It shot a nice line across my arm.....blister
>>was 4 inches long and 2mm wide...it was quite odd...not to

What a mess of units you have! That's because the transition between the
metric system  and the english system, right?

Me:

My height       => 1.80 m = 5.9 feet    = 70 inches = 1.96 yard
My weight       => 70 Kg  = 2469 ounces = 154 pounds

:) Just for fun!

Mauricio Jancic
Janso Desarrollos
Microchip Consultant
(54) - 11 - 4542 - 3519


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2003\11\12@125243 by David VanHorn

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>
>Me:
>
>My height       => 1.80 m = 5.9 feet    = 70 inches = 1.96 yard
>My weight       => 70 Kg  = 2469 ounces = 154 pounds

No furlongs and stones?

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2003\11\12@132538 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
> From an old opamp book by Smith,
> " A soldering iron has two ends, which differ markedly in the degree of
> comfort with which they can be grasped. "

Ah, this is along the lines of "hot glass looks just like cold glass"
(gotten from the www). If you make your own lab glassware you will know
what I mean here.

Peter

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2003\11\12@132742 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
> So, next to safety glasses, we need a complete safety suit incl. gloves
> and boots! Never knew this work was so dangerous ;-)

Actually working with any molten metal (excepting perhaps Wood's metal)
requires leather (or suitable substitute) apron, shoes or boots, gloves,
and no exposed body parts on front (i.e. face mask). This includes working
with molten solder or tin (such as tinning machine, wave soldering etc).
When you cast something (and often normal solder is used to test a mold)
and the cast is not perfect you can get evil gas bubbles and small steam
explosions quite easily.

My closest call was a board being reworked on a makeshift wooden table
with melamine covering (never do this) with some spacers (board feet).
The melamine heated up until a gas bubble formed under it and abruptly
rised the board as it ripped the glue off the wood. Instant mayhem, molten
solder everywhere, parts flying etc. The melamine grew a bubble the area
of a fist and 1 cm above the wood when cooled. It all happened very fast.

Peter

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2003\11\12@143052 by Tim Hart

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Yeah....I was raised on the stupid US system and then found the love of metric in College Chemistry and Calculus.  So I'm a bit messed up :)

When will the US stop ruining the children and just give up?!  Metric is far easier to work with!!  I hate my US socket set...5/16 and then ½....come on!!  11mm to 12mm....much more logical!!  Quarts, pints....two different teaspoons!!!  What a waste!!

I know this teenager and I'm attempting to teach him a mixer board.....he has no concept of K...."12K is pretty high".  He can't get it....I write it as 12,000 and he understands.  Kilo is so easy....grgrgrrrr...stupid schools!!!

It's still hard to visualize the Kilometer.....the mile is hard to ditch.

Tim

>>> jancicspam_OUTspam@spam@ARNET.COM.AR 11/12/03 11:02AM >>>
Yet another topic here..:

>>It shot a nice line across my arm.....blister
>>was 4 inches long and 2mm wide...it was quite odd...not to

What a mess of units you have! That's because the transition between the
metric system  and the english system, right?

Me:

My height       => 1.80 m = 5.9 feet    = 70 inches = 1.96 yard
My weight       => 70 Kg  = 2469 ounces = 154 pounds

:) Just for fun!

Mauricio Jancic
Janso Desarrollos
Microchip Consultant
(54) - 11 - 4542 - 3519


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2003\11\12@144538 by Michael J. Pawlowsky

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It's funny because I was initially raised with English units and then somewhere durgin my youth everything got switched over to metric (in Canada).
For a lot of things it went fine such as speed (KM/h) and I prefer working in mm than mils on PCB etc.
But there some stuff I have a hard time getting used to. Like for a person's height and weight. I still use feet and pounds.
But when buying meat/produce or whatever at a supermarket I work in grams and kilos.

So I guess it will still take one more genberation to totally sink in!

Cheers,
Mike

P.S. Has this thread ever gone it so many weird directions or what!

*********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********

>It's still hard to visualize the Kilometer.....the mile is hard to ditch.

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2003\11\12@175857 by David VanHorn

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>
>It's still hard to visualize the Kilometer.....the mile is hard to ditch.

I can't picture a hectare at all.

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2003\11\12@181137 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
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> I can't picture a hectare at all.

It's 100 ares :-)

10,000 m^2 or 100m x 100m
Each are is 100m^2 or 10m x 10m
A typical medium size house * is about 100 m^2.

So a hectare is 100 medium sized houses close packed.

This could be in a 10 x 10 square or some other shape.

In NZ the once upon a time standard section was about 1/4 acre.
A 1/4 acre is about 1000 m^2 so you should be able to close pack about 10 x
100 m^2 houses on a 1/4 acre section.
And a hectare should be about 10 x 1/4 acre sections.



       RM

* What constitutes a medium sized house will vary with locale.
Find a 100 m^2 house, decide what size it is and insert in above
descriptions :-)

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2003\11\12@181527 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 05:58 PM 11/12/2003 -0500, you wrote:
> >
> >It's still hard to visualize the Kilometer.....the mile is hard to ditch.
>
>I can't picture a hectare at all.

One km is about a city big block.

A hectare is about 2.5 acres.

They are pretty reasonable scale. A Pascal, OTOH..

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
EraseMEspeffRemoveMEspamSTOPspaminterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com

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2003\11\12@183807 by David VanHorn

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At 12:12 PM 11/13/2003 +1300, Russell McMahon wrote:

>> I can't picture a hectare at all.
>
>It's 100 ares :-)

That explains it! :)

At one time, I did an include file for Povray, for the internet movie project, because there was so much dissention over what units to use.

It took every unit of length I could find, and converted them all to the same scale, so an object that was (3*foot) was properly scaled to an object of (1.61 * cubit) or many other more obscure measurements.

I went from Angstrom to Light year, if I remember right..

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2003\11\12@184702 by Liam O'Hagan

flavicon
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www.onlineconversion.com has lots of interesting conversions available...

for example, did you know that 1 bamboo = 492.3076923 bee spaces

or that 1 fist = 5.2493438 fingerbreadths (handy!)

and that 1 gigaparsec =
2,468,542,400,000,000,512,144,840,416,808.4685424e+30 gnat's eyes


Very handy for relevant units of measurement too :)

Do I dare change the subject line?? Naaah

> {Original Message removed}

2003\11\12@190835 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
> At 05:58 PM 11/12/2003 -0500, you wrote:
> > >
> > >It's still hard to visualize the Kilometer.....the mile is
> hard to ditch.
> >
> >I can't picture a hectare at all.
>
> One km is about a city big block.
>
> A hectare is about 2.5 acres.

       Actually hectare is easy for me: a square 100m to a side.

       Acre is harder for me, I usually think of it as a square, ~60m to a side.
Not perfectly accurate but "good enough" to have an idea. TTYL

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2003\11\13@055954 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>I can't picture a hectare at all.

I used to have a property that was an acre plus 10 square metres :))

That is about 0.45 hectare.

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2003\11\13@094421 by Martin McCormick

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Herbert Graf writes:
>        Actually hectare is easy for me: a square 100m to a side.

       That's a good thing to remember for us US citizens.  A hundred
metres is a little longer than an American football field from goal line
to goal line.  I believe the end zones add 20 yards all together
so I'll think of a hectare as a square about the length of a football
field on each side.

Martin McCormick WB5AGZ  Stillwater, OK
OSU Information Technology Division Network Operations Group

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2003\11\13@124116 by gtyler

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A Ha (Hectare) is actually 2.2 acres.

George

----- Original Message -----
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To: <spam_OUTPICLISTspam_OUTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2003 1:12 AM
Subject: Re: [OT] My Time Capsule


{Quote hidden}

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2003\11\13@131101 by llile

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face
Humph!  Google does not recognize the term "picocubits" .  How could they
have gotten along in ancient Sumeria?


-- Lawrence Lile





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       To:     KILLspamPICLISTspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [OT] My Time Capsule


A Ha (Hectare) is actually 2.2 acres.

George

{Original Message removed}

2003\11\14@042007 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>Humph!  Google does not recognize the term "picocubits" .
>How could they have gotten along in ancient Sumeria?

Did not matter as they were not making microcircuits :))

Somewhere I do have an HP Journal where they talk of the chip size in
nano-acres :)

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2003\11\14@043706 by Denny Esterline

picon face
Suprising, I thought everybody worked in picocubits and nanoacres.
I was just looking to buy a 12.234 EE 11 nanoacre farm with 4.125 EE
12 picocubit high fencing all around the 1.3423 EE 6 microrod
perimiter. Complete with a 7.343 EE 6 sq gigaAngstrom barn.

-Denny


> >Humph!  Google does not recognize the term "picocubits" .
> >How could they have gotten along in ancient Sumeria?
>
> Did not matter as they were not making microcircuits :))
>
> Somewhere I do have an HP Journal where they talk of the chip size
in
> nano-acres :)
>
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