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'[OT] Mist maker'
1998\10\03@090702 by Quentin

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Hi
The Boss and I were at the garden centre today where I saw a small mist
maker. It is a little electric device (size of an ice hockey puc) that sit
in the water and emits mist. Looks very much the same as when you put dry
ice in water.
How does this work? Can it be build?

For the curious one in me (my mother knew from that day I was going to be
trouble when I stripped her alarm clock when I was 5)
Quentin

1998\10\03@092824 by goflo

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Late bloomer, eh?

Jack

Quentin wrote:
> my mother knew ... I was going to be
> trouble when I stripped her alarm clock when I was 5)

1998\10\03@100014 by Peter L. Peres

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On Sat, 3 Oct 1998, Quentin wrote:

> Hi
> The Boss and I were at the garden centre today where I saw a small mist
> maker. It is a little electric device (size of an ice hockey puc) that sit
> in the water and emits mist. Looks very much the same as when you put dry
> ice in water.
> How does this work? Can it be build?

It's got a piezo ceramic or magneto-strictive power ultrasound oscillator
in it that causes the effect. Very easy to make IF you have the power
transducer. This is not your average piezo disc. Also, if you happen to
work with power ultrasound take precautions, this is not good for your
body & eyes, also wear hearing protection.

I think there was a project about such a thing using a normal (large)
piezo disc and some garden variety components in an electronics magazine.
Try to search the web or dejanews for references on 'ultrasonic mist
generator' or 'humidifier'. I don't remember now if it was a cleaner or a
mist generator.

Peter

1998\10\03@115743 by Morgan Olsson

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At 15:02 1998-10-03 +0200, you wrote:
>Hi
>The Boss and I were at the garden centre today where I saw a small mist
>maker. It is a little electric device (size of an ice hockey puc) that sit
>in the water and emits mist. Looks very much the same as when you put dry
>ice in water.
>How does this work? Can it be build?

I once redesigned a simple oscillator for a similar thing.
It was ti make mist of oil for a combustion heat generator.

That thing vas a piezo-ceramic driven mechanic disc resonator.
Piezo disc at the base, and on that a turned metal thing consisting of a
1.5cm disk 1mm thick, and a 2cm pipe 4mm diam, with a oil feeding hole of 1mm.

The piezo drove the pipw some micrometer oscillating axially, making the
disc edge resomnate at some micrometer more amplitude.

The oil flowed very thin on the surface of the disc from the center hole
out to the edge, and from the disc edge it got thorwn out radially like a
fine mist.

Probably this is something like it.
I think maybe the water can be fed to the disc capillary, so no pump is
needed.

A simpler solution is to use a high rpm motor to trotate a disc, but that
dont'give such fine mist.

/Morgan

>For the curious one in me (my mother knew from that day I was going to be
>trouble when I stripped her alarm clock when I was 5)
>Quentin
>
>
/  Morgan Olsson, MORGANS REGLERTEKNIK, SE-277 35 KIVIK, SWEDEN \
\  spam_OUTmrtTakeThisOuTspaminame.com     ph +46(0)414 70741     fax +46(0)414 70331 /

1998\10\03@122103 by Peter L. Peres

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> disc, flowing oil

Actually you don't need that. Simply immerse the disc such that it is
covered by the liquid by 1-10 mm. The pulverisation relies on breaking
cavitation bubbles near the surface. About half the liquid 'around' the
bubbles will become aerosol. Of course if the power is not enough a simple
resonator can be used to raise the local field strength as required (as in
Morgan's tube). In this case the assembly needs to be tuned mechanically
for resonance.

Peter

1998\10\03@123939 by Morgan Olsson

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At 19:02 1998-10-03 +0000, you wrote:
...
>Of course if the power is not enough a simple
>resonator can be used to raise the local field strength as required (as in
>Morgan's tube). In this case the assembly needs to be tuned mechanically
>for resonance.
>
>Peter

Actually, the piezo was connected as the resonating part of the oscillator
(through a transformer to increase voltage).
So, no tuning was needed, just some start-up and power optimization.
If I remember correct (it was 15 years ago), the original design was based
on the simple two-transistor classic bistable design, with the primary
transformer winding connected between the collectors.
/Morgan
/  Morgan Olsson, MORGANS REGLERTEKNIK, SE-277 35 KIVIK, SWEDEN \
\  .....mrtKILLspamspam@spam@iname.com     ph +46(0)414 70741     fax +46(0)414 70331 /

1998\10\03@130646 by Brian Gracia

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At 03:02 PM 10/3/98 +0200, you wrote:
>Hi
>The Boss and I were at the garden centre today where I saw a small mist
>maker. It is a little electric device (size of an ice hockey puc) that sit
>in the water and emits mist. Looks very much the same as when you put dry
>ice in water.
>How does this work? Can it be build?
>
>For the curious one in me (my mother knew from that day I was going to be
>trouble when I stripped her alarm clock when I was 5)
>Quentin
>
>

It does this using ultrasonics.  I have seen them in pet stores.  Cool looking

Brian

1998\10\03@133841 by Bob Cousins

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Quentin wrote:

>The Boss and I were at the garden centre today where I saw a small mist
>maker. It is a little electric device (size of an ice hockey puc) that sit
>in the water and emits mist. Looks very much the same as when you put dry
>ice in water.

Does anyone know if these are available in the UK?

--
Bob Cousins, Software Engineer.
Home page at http://www.lintilla.demon.co.uk/

1998\10\03@140555 by Quentin

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Bob Cousins wrote:

>
> Does anyone know if these are available in the UK?
>
> --
> Bob Cousins, Software Engineer.
> Home page at http://www.lintilla.demon.co.uk/
As someone here told me that I must do a search on it at Deja news. I did
and I found that the discussion was from UK. In one of the posts they
mentioned a place where in the UK.
Thanks to all that replied. What I saw today was a ceramic ultrasonic
resonator. Thinking of getting one.

Quentin

1998\10\03@142659 by Peter L. Peres

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On Sat, 3 Oct 1998, Bob Cousins wrote:

> Quentin wrote:
>
> >The Boss and I were at the garden centre today where I saw a small mist
> >maker. It is a little electric device (size of an ice hockey puc) that sit
> >in the water and emits mist. Looks very much the same as when you put dry
> >ice in water.
>
> Does anyone know if these are available in the UK?

Have to be. They are used in houses heated with electricity to provide the
required humidity for reasonable conditions. Try to look at a catalog from
a heating/electrial appliance supplier. Although I understand that you
have enough natural mist there most of the time ;)

The video/show effect industry suppliers is another place to look at. Mist
generators are sometimes used to provide a 'screen' for laser light shows
over water.

Peter

1998\10\03@185423 by gwaiche

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Hi!

The mist generators used in the special effects industry and
at the disco are based on a radically different technology:

They use a mixture of water and glycol (of course each
manufacturer has its own secret receipe) that drips over
an heated surface.

gael

Peter L. Peres wrote:

> The video/show effect industry suppliers is another place to look at. Mist
> generators are sometimes used to provide a 'screen' for laser light shows
> over water.
>
> Peter

1998\10\04@072715 by Peter L. Peres

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On Sun, 4 Oct 1998, Gael Waiche wrote:

> The mist generators used in the special effects industry and
> at the disco are based on a radically different technology:
>
> They use a mixture of water and glycol (of course each
> manufacturer has its own secret receipe) that drips over
> an heated surface.

Not the ones I mean. The ones I mean are installed in decorative ponds of
floated on a lake to generate low-lying mist onto which laser light s(and
also normal beam lights) can project images such that the beam(s) are
visible.

Re: glycol, it's actually an oil and it's not very very healthy as far as
i can tell. I did service dubbing videos and U-matics that operate in a
large disco with oil-based mist and I have to say that the layer of gunk
inside the machines was millimeter thick, sticky, and stinking. Th
ewater-based mist is nothing to worry about, excepting corrosion and
electrics operated at 100% humidity.

Peter

1998\10\04@114320 by Morgan Olsson

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> The mist generators used in the special effects industry and
> at the disco are based on a radically different technology:
>
> They use a mixture of water and glycol (of course each
> manufacturer has its own secret receipe) that drips over
> an heated surface.

Someone has told me it is banana (tree?) oil.
/Morgan
/  Morgan Olsson, MORGANS REGLERTEKNIK, SE-277 35 KIVIK, SWEDEN \
\  mrtspamKILLspaminame.com     ph +46(0)414 70741     fax +46(0)414 70331 /

1998\10\05@053526 by - Underwater Acoustics Group

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On Sat, 3 Oct 1998, Bob Cousins wrote:
> Quentin wrote:
>
> >The Boss and I were at the garden centre today where I saw a small mist
> >maker. It is a little electric device (size of an ice hockey puc) that sit
> >in the water and emits mist. Looks very much the same as when you put dry
> >ice in water.
>
> Does anyone know if these are available in the UK?

It was recently discussed on uk.d-i-y after someone saw one at a garden
centre in the UK- DejaNews will probably help- it was about a month ago,
probably mentions ultrasonic or mist in the subject header...

Nigel

1998\10\05@092033 by Thurman, Chuck

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This thing is called a "nebulizer" and can be found in the cool mist
humidifiers that you see on sale in drugstores.  I was the product engineer
for these when I worked for Northern Electric, home and health care
division.  The device is a ultrasonic mechanism, and NE bought them from
Japan, the Panasonic group, as I remember as an OEM sort of thing.  The
ultrasonic portion is a thing about the size of the Nickel, a small US bit
of coinage, worth 5 cents.  The actual design of the the transducer is made
by sintering or compressing special metal alloys into a coin shape.  It is
also important to realize that the transducer power head is tilted at a 7
degree angle inside the mount.  Try to find a broken one, "humidifier",
before buying to take apart and play with it........chuck

> {Original Message removed}

1998\10\05@113856 by Matt Bonner

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Quentin (.....qscKILLspamspam.....icon.co.za) wrote:
>
> The Boss and I were at the garden centre today where I saw a small mist
> maker. It is a little electric device (size of an ice hockey puc) that sit
> in the water and emits mist. Looks very much the same as when you put dry
> ice in water.
> How does this work? Can it be build?

The bigger question: how does anyone in the Democratic Republic of Congo
(Zaire) know what a hockey puck looks like?
:-)

--Matt

1998\10\05@134903 by gwaiche

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Hi!

I agree Peter. What you state is exactly what I meant:
The the process are very different....

Cheers

Gael


> Peter wrote:

> Not the ones I mean. The ones I mean are installed in decorative ponds of
> floated on a lake to generate low-lying mist onto which laser light s(and
> also normal beam lights) can project images such that the beam(s) are
> visible.
>
> Re: glycol, it's actually an oil and it's not very very healthy as far

1998\10\05@151421 by Quentin

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Matt Bonner wrote:

> The bigger question: how does anyone in the Democratic Republic of Congo
> (Zaire) know what a hockey puck looks like?
> :-)
>
> --Matt
Yes it's something you can use as a projectile to hit somebody in the head
with.
:)
ZA is the international ID for South Africa (from Dutch: Zud Afrika, or
something like that). Yes, we know what ice hockey is, although the weather
is so good we have make artificial ice for it.

Quentin

1998\10\05@173415 by Andy Kunz

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>The bigger question: how does anyone in the Democratic Republic of Congo
>(Zaire) know what a hockey puck looks like?

How did Jamaicans know what a bobsled is? <G>

Andy


==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
==================================================================

1998\10\06@012613 by Barry Cooper

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>Yes it's something you can use as a projectile to hit somebody in the head
>with.
>:)

 Snicker

>ZA is the international ID for South Africa (from Dutch: Zud Afrika, or
>something like that). Yes, we know what ice hockey is, although the weather
>is so good we have make artificial ice for it.

 You say that like it's a bad thing. (g)

   Barry

1998\10\06@060200 by Russell McMahon

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New Zealand has a luge team - maybe the Jamaicans asked us?
(they practice on steep hills with boards with rollers on).
.
       Russell
>>The bigger question: how does anyone in the Democratic Republic of
Congo
>>(Zaire) know what a hockey puck looks like?
>
>How did Jamaicans know what a bobsled is? <G>
>
>Andy
>
>

1998\10\06@095948 by Matt Bonner

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Quentin wrote:
>
> ZA is the international ID for South Africa (from Dutch: Zud Afrika, or
> something like that). Yes, we know what ice hockey is, although the weather
> is so good we have make artificial ice for it.
>
We did the opposite here in Calgary last summer - ski jumping without
snow at Calgary Olympic Park.  If you've ever stood at the top of a 90
metre jump, you'll wonder how anyone could go down one of those things
(on snow or grass).

--Matt

1998\10\06@101238 by Quentin

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Matt Bonner wrote:

> We did the opposite here in Calgary last summer - ski jumping without
> snow at Calgary Olympic Park.  If you've ever stood at the top of a 90
> metre jump, you'll wonder how anyone could go down one of those things
> (on snow or grass).
>
> --Matt

I can only imagine. Grass burns, Ouch!

Quentin

1998\10\06@182033 by Russell McMahon

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Hey - going down is easy, I'm sure - its just the very start that's
hard!
.
-----Original Message-----
From: Matt Bonner <EraseMEmbonnerspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTSUNADA.COM>

>We did the opposite here in Calgary last summer - ski jumping
without
>snow at Calgary Olympic Park.  If you've ever stood at the top of a
90
>metre jump, you'll wonder how anyone could go down one of those
things
>(on snow or grass).

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