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'[OT] Mattel takes full responsibility for toy reca'
2007\09\21@205104 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/7006599.stm
I guess this is because of the "relentless effort to drive low cost"
in many large western companies. That is why I feel a bit uneasy when
people in this list trying to find some "lowest cost xxx"...

[quote]
But Thomas Debrowski, Mattel's executive vice president for worldwide
operations, said on Friday that the firm should shoulder the burden of
responsibility for the safety breaches.

"Mattel takes full responsibility for these recalls and apologises
personally to you, the Chinese people and all of our customers who
received the toys," he told Li Changjiang, head of China's product
quality watchdog.
[/quote]

2007\09\21@231637 by Jinx

face picon face
> Thomas Debrowski, Mattel's executive vice president for
> worldwide operations, said on Friday that the firm should
> shoulder the burden of responsibility for the safety breaches

I heard this earlier today and immediately thought Debrowski
was taking a bullet for the team. Who knows what back-room
face-saving appeasement deal has been done ? I have always
been concerned at the quality control, regardless of who is
responsible. Which you would assume is Mattel and other
importers because they are commissioning and buying the
products. To me it seems that the statement is too little too late
after being caught out by "someone's" ineptitude. And the fact
remains that the quality or suitability of some goods coming out
of China is not what is acceptable to the consumer (low low
prices notwithstanding) because of poor QC and manufacturing
monitoring

2007\09\22@000942 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On 9/22/07, Jinx <spam_OUTjoecolquittTakeThisOuTspamclear.net.nz> wrote:
>  And the fact
> remains that the quality or suitability of some goods coming out
> of China is not what is acceptable to the consumer (low low
> prices notwithstanding) because of poor QC and manufacturing
> monitoring

This is true. Some of the exporters in China are
suffering from over-competition and thus have quality
problem. I should say that the importers and the consumers
are  also partially responsible. To be honest, the exported
goods from China are in general of the better quality than
many product targeted only to the domestic mainland
China market.

Still I would like to share one of my own experiences.
Take note a lot of the QC comes from the importer
or exporter or even some 3rd party standard body. But
you can not guarantee the quality if the design was flawed.

13 years back I was working for a comestic bags company.
Do not ask me why I worked there. It was kind of
interesting experience and I did learn to speak Cantonese
because of the job. I also got to know brands like Chanel,
CD, Kenzo, etc when not many people heard of them in
China.

The quality control was quite good in most cases. In the line,
there were quite some QCs. In the end, the exporter would
send some people to do the final checkup. Sometimes they
asked a 3rd party QC companies to do the checkup. Still
in one case, after the exporter QC checked the product
(we were also confident about the quality), the product was
recalled after some time. The poor QC guy got fired and we
had to do all the reword. The final retailed charged a high
cost to rework and finally sent back all the bags for rework.

After that we found out the problem was actually the material
problem which was specified by the final customer. The
material would have some black dots due to some chemical
reaction with the lubricant oil used in the sewing machine.The
company and the exporter had to bear the full costs since we
could not afford to lost the big customer. I would say it was
still the fault of the company and the exporter in this case since
we did not know the problem of the material.


Regards,
Xiaofan

2007\09\22@001527 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
Re-post because of too many spelling errors and grammar mistakes.
Sorry. Somehow today the Gmail "Check spelling" function does not
work for me. There will still be some errors remaining but hopefully
they would not hinder your ability to understand me.

On 9/22/07, Xiaofan Chen <.....xiaofancKILLspamspam@spam@gmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2007\09\22@003144 by Marcel Duchamp

picon face
Xiaofan Chen wrote:
> There will still be some errors remaining but hopefully
> they would not hinder your ability to understand me.

Never happened yet.

Xiaofan Chen, I always appreciate your efforts.  You are from many
cultures - Chinese, Singapore, study in U.S., work for German company,
etc.  You present a very wide perception of experience.  I find much in
your emails of interest.  You offer many points of view and you do this
I think very candidly.  Honestly from your point of view.

Thank you.

2007\09\22@010254 by Jinx

face picon face
> 13 years back I was working for a comestic bags company.

> The quality control was quite good in most cases

Now I don't want to start anything, but ......

Funny you mention bags. It's not strictly a QC issue (although
someone took it upon themselves to modify the design), but is
what I'd call a suitability issue, as I mentioned in the previous
post

Swastika handbag pulled from sale

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/2/story.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10465048

"The bags were made by a supplier in India and inspired by
commonly used Hindu symbols, which include the swastika.
The original design approved by Zara did not have swastikas
on it, Inditex said"

The swastika had been around a long long time before being
appropriated by the Nazi Party

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swastika

and you might assume that a worker in India has no knowledge
of what went on over 60 years ago

Unfortunately the existence of modern-day Neo-Nazis makes
the symbol forever tainted, and not a suitable accessory for the
girl-about-town

Coincidentally the story appeared on the same day as this

http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/1318360/1374729

"There is no mistaking the symbol of hate"

Well, it's backwards, so I'd say there is a mistake

"She says the resident "freaked out" when he saw it. The Nazi
emblem stressed him out so much it sent him on a crime spree"

What a pathetic excuse

2007\09\22@013535 by John Chung

picon face
At times low cost comes to high a price. Low cost for
certain items are okay at times. Example, some of the
hot air rework station from atten is pretty decent. I
own one and provides what I need.

John


--- Xiaofan Chen <.....xiaofancKILLspamspam.....gmail.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> --

2007\09\22@132421 by Paul Hutchinson

picon face
> -----Original Message-----
> From: EraseMEpiclist-bouncesspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu On Behalf Of Xiaofan Chen
> Sent: Saturday, September 22, 2007 12:07 AM
>
> This is true. Some of the exporters in China are
> suffering from over-competition and thus have quality
> problem. I should say that the importers and the consumers
> are  also partially responsible. To be honest, the exported
> goods from China are in general of the better quality than
> many product targeted only to the domestic mainland
> China market.
>
> Still I would like to share one of my own experiences.
> Take note a lot of the QC comes from the importer
> or exporter or even some 3rd party standard body. But
> you can not guarantee the quality if the design was flawed.

Problems with design quality and QC failures don't bother me, as far as I'm
concerned, you get what you pay for. However the most recent big problems
are not cases of design or QC problems. Putting melamine in food products to
provide a boost in the nutritional test results, using lead paint on
children's toys and, putting lead in children's jewelry, seems to me can
only be accounted for by greed and lack of respect for the safety of
consumers. If US companies had done this, the lawsuits from US citizens
would at least put the fear of loss of money into the offenders if not put
them right out of business.

Paul

{Quote hidden}

2007\09\22@201553 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On 9/23/07, Paul Hutchinson <paullhutchinsonspamspam_OUTyahoo.com> wrote:
> Problems with design quality and QC failures don't bother me, as far as I'm
> concerned, you get what you pay for.

I would not say that but that is why I say that the consumers are partially
to be responsible. To be honest, the quality of quite some goods in
those dollar shops and even Walmart in US bothers me...

> However the most recent big problems
> are not cases of design or QC problems. Putting melamine in food products to
> provide a boost in the nutritional test results, using lead paint on
> children's toys and, putting lead in children's jewelry, seems to me can
> only be accounted for by greed and lack of respect for the safety of
> consumers. If US companies had done this, the lawsuits from US citizens
> would at least put the fear of loss of money into the offenders if not put
> them right out of business.
>

Yes I agree there are people and companies greedy and lack of respect
for the safety of consumers. Some of the reports for food quality in
China is very worrysome. In China a lot of the policies in place are good
but they are not followed in the local level. The central government
are trying to change that but China is such a vast country...

Partly this is due to the fast changing society in China. Over-competition
is partly resulted from over-population and lack of opportunities. Many
people want to get rich fast and I certainly feel this kind of atmosphere
when I went back home this past Chinese New Year.

And if these kind of companies got caught in China, they will be
punished as well. However sometimes the greediness just overcome
the fear...

Moreover, some of the cases are really caused by lack of education
and they just do not know what the harm they can do to the
consumers. Many of the people in rural areas do not have proper
education and do not know the laws. It will take a long long time
for China to reach the level of a developed country. Take note
the average GNP is only about US$1300 now...


Xiaofan

2007\09\23@092530 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Xiaofan Chen wrote:

> Moreover, some of the cases are really caused by lack of education and
> they just do not know what the harm they can do to the consumers.

That's probably one of the main issues. Things that are commonplace in one
country and even largely known by people who are not experts in an area may
only be known to the better experts of that particular area in another
country.

> Many of the people in rural areas do not have proper education and do not
> know the laws. It will take a long long time for China to reach the
> level of a developed country. Take note the average GNP is only about
> US$1300 now...

Right, and anybody trying to save a buck by producing in such a low-wage
country should be aware that there /is/ a difference -- after all, that's
why they moved the production there in the first place :)  Sometimes they
are, sometimes they aren't -- and sometimes they are but still don't act
accordingly.

Gerhard

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