Searching \ for '[OT] Liquid Mercury Source' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=liquid+mercury+source
Search entire site for: 'Liquid Mercury Source'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT] Liquid Mercury Source'
2008\06\13@154958 by piclist

flavicon
face
Strange request here.  Does anyone know how to buy small quanities of
mercury?  I like making visually interesting things, and one of my
projects I want to do involves mercury.  But due to it's dangers, finding
anyone that is willing to sell to an individual is pretty hard.

I live in Berkeley CA so I thought I could find a chemical supply place
locally, but no such luck so far.  Also I don't need 99.999999% purity
at $500 an ounce either, as it's just going to be used because it's shiny.

I am aware of it's dangers and plan on sealing it air tight and am not
going to be pouring any lefovers in the drain or putting it out in the
trash.

If I find enough, I'll be making something with a PIC to control it and
will post pictures. :-)

Thanks!

--
Ian Smith
http://www.ian.org

2008\06\13@160145 by sergio masci

flavicon
face

On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 spam_OUTpiclistTakeThisOuTspamian.org wrote:

> Strange request here.  Does anyone know how to buy small quanities of
> mercury?  I like making visually interesting things, and one of my
> projects I want to do involves mercury.  But due to it's dangers, finding
> anyone that is willing to sell to an individual is pretty hard.
>
> I live in Berkeley CA so I thought I could find a chemical supply place
> locally, but no such luck so far.  Also I don't need 99.999999% purity
> at $500 an ounce either, as it's just going to be used because it's shiny.
>
> I am aware of it's dangers and plan on sealing it air tight and am not
> going to be pouring any lefovers in the drain or putting it out in the
> trash.
>
> If I find enough, I'll be making something with a PIC to control it and
> will post pictures. :-)
>
> Thanks!

Depending on what you want to do, there is a gallium / indium ( / tin ?)
alloy that is liquid at room temp. It is used in "safe" thermometers in
place of mercury. It is non toxic unlike mercury. The upside of this alloy
is that you don't need to seal it in a container. The down side is that it
wets glass so the glass needs to be coated with something to stop it going
silver (gallium oxide IIRC).

Regards
Sergio Masci


2008\06\13@161820 by Bob Blick

face
flavicon
face

On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 15:49:34 -0400 (EDT), .....piclistKILLspamspam@spam@ian.org said:
> Strange request here.  Does anyone know how to buy small quanities of
> mercury?  

Hi Ian,

You can go to a car junkyard and get Ford trunk light switches, they
used them extensively in the 1990's.

Cheerful regards,

Bob

--
http://www.fastmail.fm - Send your email first class

2008\06\13@163030 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> Strange request here.  Does anyone know how to buy small
> quantities of
> mercury?  I like making visually interesting things, and
> one of my
> projects I want to do involves mercury.  But due to it's
> dangers, finding
> anyone that is willing to sell to an individual is pretty
> hard.


These people in Oregon have it or compounds and will sell it
to you at no minimum price. Hazmat shipping on such may be
horrendous and you may have to convince them that you are a
worthy buyer.

How much do you need?
Old large surplus thermometers may yield enough.

Very old barometers also used a  mercury column, but liable
to be vanishingly hard to find.
Like this one for $1000 :-(

       http://cgi.liveauctions.ebay.com/10041-ADMIRAL-FITZROY-ANTIQUE-MERCURY-BAROMETER_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQ_trksidZp1638Q2em124QQcategoryZ28296QQihZ014QQitemZ330240618393QQrdZ1QQsspagenameZWD4V

Dental suppliers may be able to help.
Or a friendly local dentist - old amalgam filling residue
can quite possibly be processed by heating, but it's
unlikely you will find a willing supplier and the hazards
are high.

Professional gold mining suppliers will stock it.




       Russell

2008\06\13@164313 by Brian Kraut

flavicon
face
Mercury is used on gyros for ships.  Our gyro tech at work used to have a
big bottle because when you do the service on them about once a year you
remove the old mercury and replace it.  If you are near a major port you
probably have a company that does gyro service near you.

Brian Kraut
Engineering Alternatives, Inc.
http://www.engalt.com

{Original Message removed}

2008\06\13@164353 by Vic Fraenckel

picon face
Bob Blick wrote:
> On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 15:49:34 -0400 (EDT), piclistspamKILLspamian.org said:
>  
>> Strange request here.  Does anyone know how to buy small quanities of
>> mercury?  
>>    

How about a home thermostat which often have tilt switches with a small
quantity of mercury in a glass tube. Perhaps a search of digikey or
mouser for tilt switches might be fruitful.

Vic
--

*____________________________________________________________________________________________*

*Victor Fraenckel
KC2GUI
windswaytoo ATSIGN gmail DOT com**
*

2008\06\13@165045 by piclist

flavicon
face
On Fri, 13 Jun 2008, sergio masci wrote:
> Depending on what you want to do, there is a gallium / indium ( / tin ?)
> alloy that is liquid at room temp. It is used in "safe" thermometers in
> place of mercury. It is non toxic unlike mercury. The upside of this alloy
> is that you don't need to seal it in a container. The down side is that it
> wets glass so the glass needs to be coated with something to stop it going
> silver (gallium oxide IIRC).

I actually have some nice chunks of pure gallium, as well as the alloy
that is liquid at room tempature.  The wetting problem is indeed why I
have not considered it, as I have not found a way of coating anything and
keeping it transparent.  The other issue is oxidation which will slowly
destroy the alloy unless I manage to get it into an oxygen-free
enviroment.  Fun to experiment with, but not easy to make anything long
term with which is a pain as it's not cheap either.

The weird thing about gallium is it's listed as non-toxic in most places,
but a number of others mention that nobody really knows much about it's
long term effects since contact with it was so very rare and it was not
studied.

--
Ian Smith
http://www.ian.org

2008\06\13@165540 by PAUL James

picon face

All,

This may be naïve on my part, but is there any form of Mercury other than liquid?


                                                                       Jim

{Original Message removed}

2008\06\13@170402 by Paul Anderson

face picon face
On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 4:55 PM, PAUL James <.....James.PaulKILLspamspam.....colibrys.com> wrote:
>
>
> This may be naïve on my part, but is there any form of Mercury other than liquid?
>
There's a lot of different compounds of mercury.  Ethyl mercury,
methyl mercury, mercury fulminate, mercuric chloride...

I just checked the site for United Nuclear, and they do indeed sell
mercury in small volumes.

http://www.unitednuclear.com/chem.htm

It's expensive, though.  One supplier I talked to wanted $1/ml.

--
Paul Anderson
VE3HOP
EraseMEwackyvorlonspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com
http://www.oldschoolhacker.com
QRP ARCI #13228, GQRP #12447

2008\06\13@174408 by sergio masci

flavicon
face


On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 piclistspamspam_OUTian.org wrote:

{Quote hidden}

I remember reading that cerium oxide changes the chemistry of the surface
of glass when it is used to polish it. I don't remember in what way but it
might be worth investigating (cerium oxide is very easy to get hold of and
is relatively cheap). Also it may be worth looking into how others coat
glass with gallium oxide, it may not be that hard. It would be a little
ironic if all you had to do was coat the glass with gallium and then just
let the coating oxidise :-) Anyway I was quite surprised to learn how easy
it is to coat glass with tin oxide.

Regards
Sergio Masci

2008\06\13@191419 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 04:55 PM 6/13/2008, you wrote:

>All,
>
>This may be naïve on my part, but is there any
>form of Mercury other than liquid?
>
>
>                                                                         Jim

Not generally, at STP (with some vapor pressure). But if you were in Boca,
California on January 20, 1937 you could have seen Hg in the solid state.

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wcstates.htm


Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
@spam@speffKILLspamspaminterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com



2008\06\13@193347 by Paul Hutchinson

picon face
> -----Original Message-----
> From: KILLspampiclist-bouncesKILLspamspammit.edu On Behalf Of PAUL James
> Sent: Friday, June 13, 2008 4:55 PM
>
> All,
>
> This may be naïve on my part, but is there any form of Mercury
> other than liquid?

Below -38.85 degC it's a solid and above 356.58 degC it's a gas ;-).

Paul Hutch

>
>                                                                        Jim

2008\06\13@194350 by Cedric Chang

flavicon
face
I have maybe a fluid oz of mercury that I will sell to you if we can  
figure out a safe way to ship it.
( or a partial quantity )
respond if interested at  RemoveMEmercuryTakeThisOuTspamnope9.com
I am in Denver, CO
cc


On Jun 13, 2008, at 1:49 PM, spamBeGonepiclistspamBeGonespamian.org wrote:

Strange request here.  Does anyone know how to buy small quanities of
mercury?  I like making visually interesting things, and one of my
projects I want to do involves mercury.  But due to it's dangers,  
finding
anyone that is willing to sell to an individual is pretty hard.

I live in Berkeley CA so I thought I could find a chemical supply place
locally, but no such luck so far.  Also I don't need 99.999999% purity
at $500 an ounce either, as it's just going to be used because it's  
shiny.

I am aware of it's dangers and plan on sealing it air tight and am not
going to be pouring any lefovers in the drain or putting it out in the
trash.

If I find enough, I'll be making something with a PIC to control it and
will post pictures. :-)

Thanks!

--
Ian Smith
http://www.ian.org

2008\06\13@213843 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Paul Anderson wrote:
> It's expensive, though.  One supplier I talked to wanted $1/ml.

It's not *that* expensive ($30/oz), especially considering the proposed use.

Vitaliy

2008\06\13@224903 by piclist

flavicon
face
On Fri, 13 Jun 2008, Vitaliy wrote:
> Paul Anderson wrote:
> > It's expensive, though.  One supplier I talked to wanted $1/ml.
>
> It's not *that* expensive ($30/oz), especially considering the proposed use.

Thats still about $400 for 3 fluid oz which is a lot of it to be sure.  I
am having a little sucess finding small amounts of it and will just horde
it until I have enough to do something interesting with.  It gets thrown
out and taken to disposal sites all the time.  I should just hang out at
one. "Hey buddy, can you spare a guy some mercury?"

--
Ian Smith
http://www.ian.org

2008\06\13@233402 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
piclist@ian.org wrote:
>> It's not *that* expensive ($30/oz), especially considering the proposed
>> use.
>
> Thats still about $400 for 3 fluid oz which is a lot of it to be sure.

Wait, didn't Paul say $1/ml?

1 liquid oz = 29.6 ml, which makes the cost $29.6/oz. Unless Paul made a
mistake. :)

>  I
> am having a little sucess finding small amounts of it and will just horde
> it until I have enough to do something interesting with.  It gets thrown
> out and taken to disposal sites all the time.  I should just hang out at
> one. "Hey buddy, can you spare a guy some mercury?"

Ian, I now know what you're *really* up to -- you are trying to replicate
the Michelson-Morley experiment!

"Vibrations were further reduced by building the apparatus on top of a huge
block of marble, which was then floated in a pool of mercury."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelson-Morley_experiment

Vitaliy

2008\06\14@001950 by piclist

flavicon
face
On Fri, 13 Jun 2008, Vitaliy wrote:
> TakeThisOuTpiclistEraseMEspamspam_OUTian.org wrote:
> >> It's not *that* expensive ($30/oz), especially considering the proposed
> >> use.
> >
> > Thats still about $400 for 3 fluid oz which is a lot of it to be sure.
>
> Wait, didn't Paul say $1/ml?
>
> 1 liquid oz = 29.6 ml, which makes the cost $29.6/oz. Unless Paul made a
> mistake. :)

Now I'm confused.  I went to the site...  http://www.unitednuclear.com/chem.htm

They list "2 ounce vial: $25.00" and I was assuming that was the weight
ounces, not fluid ounces.  They list some things in grams, some in ounces
and some in fl oz.

If the bottle weighgs 2 ounces, that is about 4ml of mercury which is far
less than 2 fluid ounces.  I guess I should write them and find out.

Paul, do you have a URL for the $1/ml quote?  Thanks!

--
Ian Smith

2008\06\14@004911 by Paul Anderson

face picon face
On Sat, Jun 14, 2008 at 12:19 AM,  <RemoveMEpiclistspamTakeThisOuTian.org> wrote:
>
>
> Paul, do you have a URL for the $1/ml quote?  Thanks!
>
Unfortunately, no.  It was through a canadian company, Efston Science,
that will order chemicals for it's customers.

--
Paul Anderson
VE3HOP
wackyvorlonEraseMEspam.....gmail.com
http://www.oldschoolhacker.com
QRP ARCI #13228, GQRP #12447

2008\06\14@011447 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> Thats still about $400 for 3 fluid oz which is a lot of it
> to be sure.  I
> am having a little sucess finding small amounts of it and
> will just horde
> it until I have enough to do something interesting with.
> It gets thrown
> out and taken to disposal sites all the time.  I should
> just hang out at
> one. "Hey buddy, can you spare a guy some mercury?"

Set up a battery disposal bin in a convenient location.
Render down the mercury cells. Dump the rest in an
"official" bin.


       Russell

2008\06\14@012824 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> Ian, I now know what you're *really* up to -- you are
> trying to replicate
> the Michelson-Morley experiment!
>
> "Vibrations were further reduced by building the apparatus
> on top of a huge
> block of marble, which was then floated in a pool of
> mercury."
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelson-Morley_experiment


Nah. He's trying to build a memory - he did say it was for
use with a PIC.

       http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delay_line_memory

       http://ed-thelen.org/comp-hist/vs-univac-mercury-memory.html

       http://www.maxmon.com/delay1.htm

I have one in my 'museum' which uses a similar method but
stores the data in a spiral of wire. Acoustic delay line
memory.

If you can't get enough Mercury for a memory you could try a
CRT memory.

   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williams_tube

Then you can read it optically personally at the same time
the computer (PIC) is accessing it. AND see its memory usage
patterns to boot.

And friends.
Including a picture of Grace Hopper. We won't mention the
COBOL manual.

       http://infolab.stanford.edu/pub/voy/museum/pictures/display/2-1.htm#tube

Variant of acoustic delay line memory half way down. .



       Russell

2008\06\14@081151 by Dennis Crawley

picon face
On Friday, June 13, 2008 4:49 PM [GMT-3=CET],
EraseMEpiclistspamian.org  wrote:

> Strange request here.  Does anyone know how to buy small quanities of
> mercury?  I like making visually interesting things, and one of my
> Ian Smith

Ask your dentist to gives you a sample in your next visit ;)

... my father is a dentist, an also my brother, all in law relatives,...
btw, I've never ever went to a dentist! Zero cavities, good ph I think.

Dennis


2008\06\16@063942 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>This may be naïve on my part, but is there any form of Mercury other than
>liquid?

Well, when I was at secondary school I had a piece of solid mercury sitting
on the tip of my finger for a few minutes.

But then it had just come out of a liquid nitrogen container ...

But I suspect the OP is attempting to distinguish what he wants from other
compounds of mercury that come in powder form (I think mercury fulminate is
one, but it is a component of some explosives IIRC).

2008\06\16@110317 by M. Adam Davis

face picon face
On 6/14/08, Dennis Crawley <RemoveMEdennis.crawleyEraseMEspamEraseMEusa.net> wrote:
> On Friday, June 13, 2008 4:49 PM [GMT-3=CET],
> RemoveMEpiclistspam_OUTspamKILLspamian.org  wrote:
>
> > Strange request here.  Does anyone know how to buy small quanities of
> > mercury?  I like making visually interesting things, and one of my
> > Ian Smith
>
> Ask your dentist to gives you a sample in your next visit ;)
>
> ... my father is a dentist, an also my brother, all in law relatives,...
> btw, I've never ever went to a dentist! Zero cavities, good ph I think.

You'll never see what you don't look for... ;-)

-Adam

--
EARTH DAY 2008
Tuesday April 22
Save Money * Save Oil * Save Lives * Save the Planet
http://www.driveslowly.org

2008\06\16@110834 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
Red Mercury ? ;-)

On 6/16/08, Alan B. Pearce <RemoveMEA.B.PearceTakeThisOuTspamspamrl.ac.uk> wrote:
> >This may be naïve on my part, but is there any form of Mercury other than
> >liquid?
>
> Well, when I was at secondary school I had a piece of solid mercury sitting
> on the tip of my finger for a few minutes.
>
> But then it had just come out of a liquid nitrogen container ...
>
> But I suspect the OP is attempting to distinguish what he wants from other
> compounds of mercury that come in powder form (I think mercury fulminate is
> one, but it is a component of some explosives IIRC).
>
>

2008\06\16@112923 by Paul Anderson

face picon face
On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 3:49 PM,  <EraseMEpiclistspamspamspamBeGoneian.org> wrote:
> Strange request here.  Does anyone know how to buy small quanities of
> mercury?  I like making visually interesting things, and one of my
> projects I want to do involves mercury.  But due to it's dangers, finding
> anyone that is willing to sell to an individual is pretty hard.
>
>
Well, I just got off the phone with Efston Science.  Regarding
mercury, it appears that no one who supplies them has it available
anymore.  VWR will sell it to you, but you need to be an established
customer.  They won't sell to the general public.


--
Paul Anderson
VE3HOP
RemoveMEwackyvorlonKILLspamspamgmail.com
http://www.oldschoolhacker.com
QRP ARCI #13228, GQRP #12447

2008\06\16@150834 by piclist

flavicon
face
On Mon, 16 Jun 2008, Alan B. Pearce wrote:
> But I suspect the OP is attempting to distinguish what he wants from other
> compounds of mercury that come in powder form (I think mercury fulminate is
> one, but it is a component of some explosives IIRC).

You are correct.  I should have said "elemental" mercury I suppose. :-)

Trying to clean the scum off dirty mercury is 'fun' too.  Distilling it is
simply insanity outside a fully equipped lab.  Disolving the impurities
with nitric acid is less insane, but still dangerous.  Best method I can
see is dripping it slowly through a tiny hole until all the impurities are
contained in the final drop.

--
Ian Smith
http://www.ian.org

2008\06\16@153421 by Paul Anderson

face picon face
On Mon, Jun 16, 2008 at 3:08 PM,  <piclistSTOPspamspamspam_OUTian.org> wrote:
>
> Trying to clean the scum off dirty mercury is 'fun' too.  Distilling it is
> simply insanity outside a fully equipped lab.  Disolving the impurities
> with nitric acid is less insane, but still dangerous.  Best method I can
> see is dripping it slowly through a tiny hole until all the impurities are
> contained in the final drop.
>
>
My father used to work on flow meters that relied on a fairly large
volume of mercury, about 1 liter.  He would take a cone-shaped coffee
filter or filter paper, and cut the tip off.  He would pour the
mercury through this filter paper funnel, and the impurities would
stick to the sides.

--
Paul Anderson
VE3HOP
spamBeGonewackyvorlonSTOPspamspamEraseMEgmail.com
http://www.oldschoolhacker.com
QRP ARCI #13228, GQRP #12447

2008\06\16@184039 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Alan B. Pearce wrote:
>>Well, when I was at secondary school I had a piece of solid mercury
>>sitting
on the tip of my finger for a few minutes.<<

When I was in elementary school, my cousing broke a thermometer and showed
me how to make a (Soviet) copper penny into a shiny silver dime (he rubbed
it in mercury with his fingers).

A few years later, I witnessed a group of kids breaking fluorescent bulbs
and rubbing pennies with the white powder. When I pointed out that mercury
is toxic, and they really shouldn't be handling it, they gave me a lecture
on how crazy they would have been to use mercury, and that the white powder
wasn't mercury at all. :)

Vitaliy

2008\06\16@185615 by piclist

flavicon
face
On Mon, 16 Jun 2008, Vitaliy wrote:
> A few years later, I witnessed a group of kids breaking fluorescent bulbs
> and rubbing pennies with the white powder. When I pointed out that mercury
> is toxic, and they really shouldn't be handling it, they gave me a lecture
> on how crazy they would have been to use mercury, and that the white powder
> wasn't mercury at all. :)

Is there ANYONE who has not touched or played with mercury as a kid?  Even
with all the information now I still run into people who say it's
perfectly safe to play with it in your hands.  

I do think there is overreaction going on though.  Mercury poisioning via
coal plants and it building up in fish is a very nasty problem, but you
don't have to drag your house to a toxic waste dump if you break a CF
lamp.

--
Ian Smith
http://www.ian.org

2008\06\16@191205 by Tomás Ó hÉilidhe

picon face



Anyone looking for Mercury in Ireland, let me know. A mate of mine
swiped it from school about a decade ago, still has it in his drawer.
I'd say the volume is somewhere near 100 ml or so. I'm sure it's more of
a souvenir than anything to him now, but if the price's right...

2008\06\16@202928 by Paul Anderson

face picon face
On Mon, Jun 16, 2008 at 6:55 PM,  <KILLspampiclistspamBeGonespamian.org> wrote:
>
> I do think there is overreaction going on though.  Mercury poisioning via
> coal plants and it building up in fish is a very nasty problem, but you
> don't have to drag your house to a toxic waste dump if you break a CF
> lamp.
>
>
The funny thing is that the mercury from these plants is most
emphatically not the same as the mercury that people will play with.
Pure mercury isn't nearly as toxic as organic mercury compounds, like
methyl mercury.  The biggest risk when handling pure mercury is from
it evapourating, and inhaling the fumes.  Truth is, gasoline is far
more dangerous.  It contains several known carcinogens which can be
inhaled as vapour and absorbed through the skin.  In reality, when
pumping gasoline a wise person would wear a respirator, gloves and
goggles.

Mercury is a favourite to panic over, but we deal with chemicals that
are far worse on a regular basis.  People would be horrified to see
jars of mercury at the hardware store, yet muriatic acid, drain
cleaner and chlorine bleach are perfectly fine.

--
Paul Anderson
VE3HOP
EraseMEwackyvorlonspamEraseMEgmail.com
http://www.oldschoolhacker.com
QRP ARCI #13228, GQRP #12447

2008\06\16@204515 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> Is there ANYONE who has not touched or played with mercury
> as a kid?  Even
> with all the information now I still run into people who
> say it's
> perfectly safe to play with it in your hands.

1.    There's your source - dead fluro tubes - available for
free all over. You could probably make an extractor that
removes much of the powder in a single pass. Taking the ends
off cleanly and rendering the end product safe left as an
exercise for the student.

2.    When I was very young (memories of AA Milne book title
flit across hind brain) I bit a thermometer and swallowed
the mercury. It appeared to do no harm, although some would
say that ... .

> I do think there is overreaction going on though.  Mercury
> poisioning via
> coal plants and it building up in fish is a very nasty
> problem, but you
> don't have to drag your house to a toxic waste dump if you
> break a CF
> lamp.

The cleanup suggestions for a CFL breakage seem extreme to
me.
However, as they must be written to cover all levels of
experience and general competence I guess an "Osborne 0 of
CFL breakage" is appropriate :-)


       Russell



2008\06\16@205801 by Tomás Ó hÉilidhe

picon face

I've been contacted privately by a member of the Piclist who opened my
eyes to what I was doing in posting the quoted message below.

I thought people would see the light side of it; a friend of mine took
the mercury from chemistry in school when we were 16 and he still has it
in his drawer at home. Typical teenager thing to do, you know.

I hope people don't see it as anything more sinister, i.e. enticing
people to buy stolen goods.

Offer still stands though, I'll say it to my mate and see if he wants to
get rid of it for a bit of dosh.

Tomás Ó hÉilidhe wrote:
> Anyone looking for Mercury in Ireland, let me know. A mate of mine
> swiped it from school about a decade ago, still has it in his drawer.
> I'd say the volume is somewhere near 100 ml or so. I'm sure it's more of
> a souvenir than anything to him now, but if the price's right...

2008\06\16@230613 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Apptech wrote:
> 1.    There's your source - dead fluro tubes - available for
> free all over. You could probably make an extractor that
> removes much of the powder in a single pass. Taking the ends
> off cleanly and rendering the end product safe left as an
> exercise for the student.

Those were old, Soviet-era tubes. Modern fluorescents have very little
mercury, and the tubes you're likely to find at the dump may even have none:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescent_lamp#Loss_of_mercury

> 2.    When I was very young (memories of AA Milne book title
> flit across hind brain) I bit a thermometer and swallowed
> the mercury. It appeared to do no harm, although some would
> say that ... .

Oh yeah, that certainly explains certain things, like your tendency to...
no, Russell, I'd say that you have suffered absolutely no ill effects. ;-)

I remember reading somewhere that in the olden times patients suffering from
twisted bowels were made to drink a pint of mercury to straighten them out.
I'm curious if there are any records of what happened to these patients.

There's no doubt that mercury poisoning is real, but I think it takes more
than a single exposure to get a harmful dose.

Vitaliy

2008\06\16@231915 by Marcel

picon face
Vitaliy wrote:
> Apptech wrote:
>  
> Oh yeah, that certainly explains certain things, like your tendency to...
> no, Russell, I'd say that you have suffered absolutely no ill effects. ;-)
>
> I remember reading somewhere that in the olden times patients suffering from
> twisted bowels were made to drink a pint of mercury to straighten them out.
> I'm curious if there are any records of what happened to these patients.
>
> There's no doubt that mercury poisoning is real, but I think it takes more
> than a single exposure to get a harmful dose.
>
> Vitaliy
>
>  

Mad as a hatter, 'e wuz, guvnor, mad as a hatter!

2008\06\16@235525 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
{Quote hidden}

For those who miss Marcel's allusion.
Hat makers, aka "Hatters" used to employ mercury in the
felting process whereby threads of wool etc are made into a
continuous sheet. So mercury poisoning was a trade hazard
and hatters often "went mad" as a consequence - hence the
phrase "mad as a hatter".


       Russell


2008\06\17@000450 by Jinx

face picon face
> I remember reading somewhere that in the olden times patients
> suffering from twisted bowels were made to drink a pint of
> mercury to straighten them out. I'm curious if there are any
> records of what happened to these patients.

Well, if you want a barometer of what's wrong with the health
system .......

2008\06\17@000740 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> Those were old, Soviet-era tubes. Modern fluorescents have
> very little
> mercury, and the tubes you're likely to find at the dump
> may even have none:
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescent_lamp#Loss_of_mercury


Reportedly even the "best" CFLs have some mercury. 10 to 20
mg comes to mind.


       Russell


2008\06\17@010612 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Jun 16, 2008, at 9:05 PM, Apptech wrote:

> Reportedly even the "best" CFLs have some mercury. 10 to 20
> mg comes to mind.

There was quite a bit of discussion as a result of my "take apart a  
CFL" "instructable" (http://www.instructables.com/id/Take-apart-a-
Compact-Fluorescent-Bulb/ ); see the comments.  I dunno if any of the  
number were authoritative, and I wasn't really interested in chasing  
down competing links when MY whole point was "don't break the glass",  
but the number thrown around most was "under 5mg per bulb."

BillW

2008\06\17@014930 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Apptech wrote:
>> Those were old, Soviet-era tubes. Modern fluorescents have
>> very little
>> mercury, and the tubes you're likely to find at the dump
>> may even have none:
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescent_lamp#Loss_of_mercury
>
>
> Reportedly even the "best" CFLs have some mercury. 10 to 20
> mg comes to mind.

You like to muddy the waters, Russell! :)

How many CFLs would the OP have to extract the mercury from, to obtain the
amount he needs (several fl oz)? As far as he's concerned, CFLs and most
modern FLs have *zero* mercury content. :)

Vitaliy

2008\06\17@041152 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>Trying to clean the scum off dirty mercury is 'fun' too.  Distilling
>it is simply insanity outside a fully equipped lab.  Disolving the
>impurities with nitric acid is less insane, but still dangerous.
>Best method I can see is dripping it slowly through a tiny hole
>until all the impurities are contained in the final drop.

I thought that folks using mercury to get gold out of minerals had this down
to a fine art. You heat it so the mercury fumes off, and bubble the fumes
through water to condense them. You end up with a bubble of mercury under
the water.

2008\06\17@042246 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
>> Reportedly even the "best" CFLs have some mercury. 10 to
>> 20
>> mg comes to mind.

> You like to muddy the waters, Russell! :)

I was *seeking* to assist and inform :-)

____________________

DAMAR. Straight.
Some

       http://damarww.net/common/msds/Fluorescent-MSDS.pdf

Philips MSDS CFL
0.02%

       http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/us/ecatalog/msds/s08-93005.pdf

Philips linear
0.01%

       http://www.nofs.navy.mil/about_NOFS/staff/cbl/LPSnet/FL-MSDS.pdf

Philips linear
< 0.01%

       http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/us/ecatalog/msds/s06-96001.pdf

Mercury
Quick Silver death
Lots and lots and lots of good rubbish

       http://www.home-air-purifier-expert.com/mercury-msds.html

GE
Fluro generally
Small
25% of old not small.

   http://www.geconsumerandindustrial.com/environmentalinfo/documents/msds/msds_fluorescent_lamps.pdf

Full Spectrum linear low mercury
< 20 ppm

       http://www.fullspectrumsolutions.com/MSDS-Maxum.htm

MIT environment / disposal

       http://web.mit.edu/environment/ehs/topic/haz_waste_faq.html

Oklahoma regulatory - non hazardous at < 0.2 mg/l

   http://www.deq.state.ok.us/factsheets/land/MgtUsedFluoreLamps.pdf



   Russell


> How many CFLs would the OP have to extract the mercury
> from, to obtain the
> amount he needs (several fl oz)? As far as he's concerned,
> CFLs and most
> modern FLs have *zero* mercury content. :)
>
> Vitaliy
>
> --

2008\06\17@043400 by Jinx

face picon face
> You heat it so the mercury fumes off, and bubble the fumes
> through water to condense them. You end up with a bubble
> of mercury under the water

All the rage on the banks of South American rivers. Still more
likely in a Hemingway novel than recovering mercury from an
intestine straightening. Wow, there's a job description

2008\06\17@044521 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>The biggest risk when handling pure mercury is from
>it evapourating, and inhaling the fumes.

I still think about the time when I was a lab boy in the physics lab during
my last year at secondary school. One of the science teachers wanted a
demonstration of electromagnetism in wires. She wanted to hang a couple of
wires from test tube stands into a bowl of mercury, and run a current
through them so that the first year students could see the wires move
together or apart depending on the relative current direction.

So here is Yours Truly dipping wires into the mercury bath, to turn on the
current from a 6V motor bike battery, with the only current limiting being
the resistance of the mercury bath. As you can imagine the wire drew a spark
on make and break, and sometimes the bottom of the suspended wires did as
well, all creating little puffs of mercury vapour, no face mask, no fume
cupboard, no eye protection ...

Still here 40 years later though ...

2008\06\17@052430 by Jinx

face picon face
> The biggest risk when handling pure mercury is from
> it evapourating, and inhaling the fumes.

Back when I was a chemist, a girl in our lab had a propensity
for breaking thermometers in the small controlled-environment
room. Or "Janice's Death Chamber" as it was known. Even
with a pocketful of stainless steel spatulas and glass rods she'd
still rather use a fragile thermometer as a stirrer. I've got a couple
of ml of sweepings in a vial from those days


2008\06\17@054018 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Jun 17, 2008, at 1:44 AM, Alan B. Pearce wrote:

> Still here 40 years later though

Perhaps mild mercury exposure causes ... Engineers!

 :-)
BillW

2008\06\17@062704 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
>> You heat it so the mercury fumes off, and bubble the
>> fumes
>> through water to condense them. You end up with a bubble
>> of mercury under the water

> All the rage on the banks of South American rivers. Still
> more
> likely in a Hemingway novel than recovering mercury from
> an
> intestine straightening. Wow, there's a job description

According to Josephus, Jews escaping from Jerusalem in 70 AD
before the city was taken and the temple razed, were found
by non-Jewish locals (Roman-camp camp followers) to be
sorting through excrement to recover jewels that they had
swallowed before fleeing. Subsequently all escapees were
disembowelled to recover whatever 'treasure' they may have
swallowed for a while until the Romans managed to stop it
happening.

Those attempting to flee the city were killed as traitors by
local management if possible. Those who did escape had to
run the gauntlet to safety. Most in the city were massacred
when the Temple (a superb fortress in its own right) was
overrun.


       R



2008\06\17@133906 by piclist

flavicon
face
On Tue, 17 Jun 2008, Apptech wrote:
> 2.    When I was very young (memories of AA Milne book title
> flit across hind brain) I bit a thermometer and swallowed
> the mercury. It appeared to do no harm, although some would
> say that ... .

Luckily the biggest risk is inhaling the fumes which go right into the
bloodstream.  Swallowing it is actually safer than breathing it, go
figure.

Plutonium and many other radioactives are similar.  If you ate some
plutonium you would end up dying from it's chemical toxicity but not be
too harmed otherwise. :-)

There was a recorded case of a worker swallowing a pellet of Am-232 at a
factory that makes smoke detectors.  Passed through intact and was just
fine.  What I want to know is HOW do you do that by accident?

--
Ian Smith
http://www.ian.org

2008\06\17@135042 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
Quoting @spam@piclist@spam@spamspam_OUTian.org:

> On Tue, 17 Jun 2008, Apptech wrote:
>> 2.    When I was very young (memories of AA Milne book title
>> flit across hind brain) I bit a thermometer and swallowed
>> the mercury. It appeared to do no harm, although some would
>> say that ... .
>
> Luckily the biggest risk is inhaling the fumes which go right into the
> bloodstream.  Swallowing it is actually safer than breathing it, go
> figure.

There was a case of a person who attempted suicide by injecting Hg  
into directly into a vein. It simply pooled and did not kill them, at  
least not very
quickly:

http://www.circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/91/12/3020


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
spamBeGones...spamKILLspaminterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com

2008\06\17@163447 by Gacrowell

flavicon
face
Interesting, but it didn't mention treatment other than "supportive care
suffices".  So I suppose it gets removed naturally; by the kidneys,
perhaps?  Not as bad as kidney stones, I guess.

GC

> {Original Message removed}

2008\06\17@215236 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> Plutonium and many other radioactives are similar.  If you
> ate some
> plutonium you would end up dying from it's chemical
> toxicity but not be
> too harmed otherwise. :-)

And, FWIW, Plutonium is far far less poisonous chemically
than it is usually alleged to be.




       Russell

2008\06\19@032248 by Jinx

face picon face
> Pure mercury isn't nearly as toxic as organic mercury compounds,
> like methyl mercury

That's when many elements/compounds are dangerous, when they're
fat-soluble

How about these two guys -

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10517279

I feel a little sympathetic, apart from "This person warned the
engineers that it was a hazardous substance they were letting off,
however they didn't take much notice of this warning"

I'm sure you could pick on just about anyone and dob them for
something they did/are doing

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2008 , 2009 only
- Today
- New search...