Searching \ for '[OT] Legal status of improved source code' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=legal+status+improved
Search entire site for: 'Legal status of improved source code'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT] Legal status of improved source code'
2012\02\15@122739 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

flavicon
face
Dear all,


Many should know that Microchip's MPLAB C18 compiler comes with full
source code of its libraries, even the lite and eval versions.

I made many improvements to said files for my own use. My question is:
how could I share my improvements with others without breaching
Microchip's copyright?

I have thought that perhaps I can publish the diffs between my versions
and Microchip's. Diff files bear a minimum of the original source code
just to contextualize where the changes are to be inserted. This way, by
using my diffs alone nobody can retrieve Microchip's source code, he/she
would need to have already the original source code to apply the patches
against.

What do you think?


Some files I rewrote from scratch. Those I think are safe to share.


Best regards,

Isaac

2012\02\15@123827 by Alex Harford

face picon face
On Wed, Feb 15, 2012 at 9:27 AM, Isaac Marino Bavaresco
<spam_OUTisaacbavarescoTakeThisOuTspamyahoo.com.br> wrote:
> Many should know that Microchip's MPLAB C18 compiler comes with full
> source code of its libraries, even the lite and eval versions.
>
> I made many improvements to said files for my own use. My question is:
> how could I share my improvements with others without breaching
> Microchip's copyright?

Do they include licensing information in the files, or elsewhere in
the C18 documentation?

Even things you rewrote from scratch may still be affected as they are
presumably based on copyrighted interfaces that Microchip developed

2012\02\15@132050 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

flavicon
face
Em 15/2/2012 15:38, Alex Harford escreveu:
> On Wed, Feb 15, 2012 at 9:27 AM, Isaac Marino Bavaresco
> <.....isaacbavarescoKILLspamspam@spam@yahoo.com.br> wrote:
>> Many should know that Microchip's MPLAB C18 compiler comes with full
>> source code of its libraries, even the lite and eval versions.
>>
>> I made many improvements to said files for my own use. My question is:
>> how could I share my improvements with others without breaching
>> Microchip's copyright?
> Do they include licensing information in the files, or elsewhere in
> the C18 documentation?


The only reference to libraries in the file "MPLABC18CompilerLicense.txt":


"You may modify the Software runtime libraries at your discretion and risk.
For purposes of clarity, such modifications constitute derivatives of the
Software subject to the terms of Section 3 below."

....

"3.    OWNERSHIP AND TITLE. Software is licensed pursuant to the Agreement,
not sold. Except for the free software described in Section 1, all right,
title and interest, including intellectual property rights, in and to
Software, derivatives thereof, implementation of the Software in
microcontrollers, and hardware and software implementations of Software or
derivatives shall remain in Company. You will not obtain ownership rights
to derivatives of Software, and by accepting the terms of this Agreement
assign any such rights to Company that You do receive. Except as
specifically stated in the Agreement, You are granted no other rights,
express or implied, to the Software, derivatives thereof, or other Company
intellectual property such as trade secrets, patents, copyrights,
and trademarks."


What parts are free software? Section 1 doesn't make it clear. The only
files bearing a "Red Hat" copyright are in the directory "libpopt":


"1.    FREE SOFTWARE. Portions of the Software are based on the command-line
options processing source code copyrighted by Red Hat Software. The Red Hat
source code and accompanying documentation files ("Red Hat Source Code") is
offered with the Software licensed under this Agreement. Permission is
hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this
Software to deal in the Red Hat Source Code only without restriction,
including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge,
publish,
distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of Red Hat Source Code, and to
permit persons to whom the Red Hat Source Code is furnished to do so,
provided that the permission notice (provided in the file in the
preprocessor
source code called, "COPYING") and the following copyright notice are
included in all copies or substantial portions of the Red Hat Source Code:

   Copyright (c) 1998 Red Hat Software

Portions of the Software are based on C parser source code copyrighted by
James A. Roskind ("Roskind Source Code"). With regard to Roskind Source Code
(which is not offered with the Software), no royalties, licenses or
commissions of any kind are required to copy such code, its translations,
or derivative products provided that the following copyright notice appears
in keeping with copyright law:

   Copyright (c) 1989, 1990 James A. Roskind"


> Even things you rewrote from scratch may still be affected as they are
> presumably based on copyrighted interfaces that Microchip developed.


In this case I don't think so, because the files implement the standard
C library, that Microchip also based on somebody's else code.


Isaac

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2012 , 2013 only
- Today
- New search...