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'[OT] Lawn mower rock sensor'
2005\08\15@171916 by Walter Banks

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I have an old lawn mower that has shear pins in the blade drive. What
it uses and the way it works is quite interesting.
The shear pins are in the drive of the blade so the blade and mower
will not part company. The shear pins (for those old agriculture types)
are agriculture mower blade reviets from a cutting bar on a tractor
mounted mower, dropped through the blade as a pin where the
reviet  head is driven by the motor.

The failure mode is interesting. When the pins shear the blade
will keep turning because the trapped decapitated reviet head
will still catch the hole in the blade. This is a mode that I have
left it in to accomplish what is effectively a a rock mower.

I have been replacing pins about every couple years as the
reviet heads wear out with each rock hit.

w..



Michael Rigby-Jones wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2005\08\16@192055 by Michael Dipperstein

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flavicon
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> From: spam_OUTpiclist-bouncesTakeThisOuTspammit.edu [.....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu] On
Behalf
> Of marcelspamKILLspamcarrietech.com
> Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 3:57 PM
> To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
> Subject: Re: [EE] Lawn mower rock sensor
>
> And you could mount some Sidewinder missiles on the lawn mower to
destroy
> any
> interfering objects... Or high-powered lasers! Or some sort of
high-energy
> ray
> thing.
> Or, y'know. A cowcatcher or mechanical detector, as has been
suggested.
> - Marcel

Sidewinders probably wouldn't work on rocks, they use IR for guidance.
I'm guessing that rocks are too close to the temperature of the rest of
the surrounding ground.  It might work if you use a high-powered laser
to heat up the rock first.

-Mike

2005\08\16@231958 by R. I. Nelson

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I have my fathers John deere  riding lawn mower he bought new in 1974.  
His method seemed to work best and has worked well for me.
You mount a small box to the back of the mower.  You look for the rocks
or other things that might damage the blades.  When you see one of these
you get off your A**  pick it up, put it in the box and the problem is
solved some what permenantly.  You also drive over the area before the
grass gets long enough to hide such things and pick them up.  These
things have made the mower last 31 seasons.

>  
>



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2005\08\17@080503 by Howard Winter

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Michael,

On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 16:20:54 -0700, Michael Dipperstein wrote:

> Sidewinders probably wouldn't work on rocks, they use IR for guidance.
> I'm guessing that rocks are too close to the temperature of the rest of
> the surrounding ground.  It might work if you use a high-powered laser
> to heat up the rock first.

Or a flame-thrower - which would remove the problem of cutting the grass too!  :-)

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2005\08\17@114012 by KY1K

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>
>
>Or a flame-thrower - which would remove the problem of cutting the
>grass too!  :-)


The controlled burn is not a bad idea, it would expose the bare
ground and allow us to have the backhoe remove the boulders and do
the regrading necessary to smooth out the ground surface.

But, our local Fire Department refuses to do controlled burns and we
can't do it ourselves without breaking the law.

Have a great day.

Art in Maine


2005\08\17@160457 by Peter

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On Wed, 17 Aug 2005, KY1K wrote:

> But, our local Fire Department refuses to do controlled burns and we can't do
> it ourselves without breaking the law.

Open the field for camping for a token fee and wait ?

Peter

2005\08\18@035624 by Alan B. Pearce

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>> But, our local Fire Department refuses to do controlled burns
>> and we can't do it ourselves without breaking the law.
>
>Open the field for camping for a token fee and wait ?

Well, my thoughts were more along the lines of "why get sooty and smoky,
just get the backhoe straight in"

2005\08\19@134139 by KY1K

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>
>Well, my thoughts were more along the lines of "why get sooty and smoky,
>just get the backhoe straight in"

Sounds like a good idea...on the surface that is......

BUT.........

We can't do it in the Spring, there is to much water and mud from
snow melting. Later in the summer, there is to much grass for the
backhoe operator to see what he's doing and the job comes out with
many rough surfaces and holes, rocks left in etc.

It doesn't work-we've been there, done that. If the surface isn't
reasonably prepped and mowed/nearly bare, it don't work.

This is our 12th year at this location, we've got a fair amount of
real life experience from this ongoing project.

GL to all.

Art


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