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'[OT] International Move - What materials are banne'
2012\04\30@082905 by Tamas Rudnai

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Hi list,

Does anyone has experience on what type of materials are banned from
shipping by sailing? I have quite a few pressurized cans of PCB lacquer,
PCB cleaner, contact cleaner airdust etc, not sure what can and what cannot
be sent over the ocean? Also I have a 3/4 full jerrican of imperial gallon
of nitro-methanol fuel for my RC aircraft, has anyone already shipped
anything like that?

Many thanks,
Tama

2012\04\30@090500 by RussellMc

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> International Move

>From ... To ?
Liable to be relevan

2012\04\30@123658 by Tamas Rudnai

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>From the UK (Reading) to US (California).

In the meanwhile the moving company responded and they have said I cannot
take those cans and the fuel with me.

Thanks,
Tamas


On 30 April 2012 14:04, RussellMc <spam_OUTapptechnzTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:

> > International Move
>
> >From ... To ?
> Liable to be relevant
>

2012\04\30@140210 by John Ferrell

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RC Fuel is readily available in all of the US. Most paints are also readily available. California originates a lot of Junk Science and has a lot of laws conjured up by aging, drug damaged Hippies. No point in trying to reason with them...

On 4/30/2012 12:36 PM, Tamas Rudnai wrote:
> > From the UK (Reading) to US (California).
>
> In the meanwhile the moving company responded and they have said I cannot
> take those cans and the fuel with me.
>
> Thanks,
> Tamas
>
>
> On 30 April 2012 14:04, RussellMc<.....apptechnzKILLspamspam@spam@gmail.com>  wrote:
>
>>> International Move
>> > From ... To ?
>> Liable to be relevant
>> -

2012\04\30@144904 by Bob Blick

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It's the moving company that is objecting, John. They don't want one
customer's cargo to set everything on fire.

California is beautiful, everybody else badmouths us because they are
jealous. Especially gap-toothed meth-heads from the South :) Just
trading stereotypes.
Don't start a war if you don't want one.

Best regards,

Bob


On Mon, Apr 30, 2012, at 02:02 PM, John Ferrell wrote:
{Quote hidden}

-- http://www.fastmail.fm - Access all of your messages and folders
                         wherever you are

2012\04\30@152836 by Tamas Rudnai

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Haha, good one :-)

Yes, the moving company is objecting, but also there are quite a few law in
the US -- for example as I have heard they do not like if someone brings a
sword over, even if that is non-sharp and is for display only. I think they
should worry about my piano instead as I can hurt more people with that by
trying to play on it :-)

Tamas



On 30 April 2012 19:49, Bob Blick <bobblickspamKILLspamftml.net> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>

2012\04\30@153530 by Bob Blick

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Pretty much the objections to swords can be overcome, my son has
traveled to and from Hong Kong with swords and spears. (he's a martial
arts instructor).

Best regards,

Bob


On Mon, Apr 30, 2012, at 08:28 PM, Tamas Rudnai wrote:
{Quote hidden}

-- http://www.fastmail.fm - Does exactly what it says on the tin

2012\04\30@154845 by Tamas Rudnai

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Good to know this, thanks. In fact this sword was bought by my friend in
Japan, and he could bring it here to the UK, just heard that is was
different in the US, but then obviously not much.

To be honest I do not know how to handle it, but fascinated by the asian
martial arts - and it looks very nice.

Tamas


On 30 April 2012 20:35, Bob Blick <.....bobblickKILLspamspam.....ftml.net> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>

2012\04\30@160232 by John Ferrell

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Sorry if I pinched a nerve! I concede, all of the US shares in the same problems...

On 4/30/2012 2:49 PM, Bob Blick wrote:
{Quote hidden}

-- John Ferrell W8CCW
“During times of universal deceit,
  Telling the TRUTH becomes a revolutionary act”
     George Orwell

2012\04\30@175210 by Luis Moreira

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Hi Tamas,
Come on mate be reasonable, even in the UK the transport companies don't
like to carry that stuff, why would you want to create problems on your
move because of that? Just leave it behind, I am sure you will find r/c
fuel in California.
By the way have nice time,   I like the rain, me, can not think how you
will cope with the sunshine and the girls :-)
Best regards
              Luis
On Apr 30, 2012 7:06 PM, "John Ferrell" <EraseMEjferrell13spam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTtriad.rr.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2012\04\30@194350 by peter green

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Tamas Rudnai wrote:
> Hi list,
>
> Does anyone has experience on what type of materials are banned from
> shipping by sailing? I have quite a few pressurized cans of PCB lacquer,
> PCB cleaner, contact cleaner airdust etc, not sure what can and what cannot
> be sent over the ocean? Also I have a 3/4 full jerrican of imperial gallon
> of nitro-methanol fuel for my RC aircraft, has anyone already shipped
> anything like that?
I'm sure pretty much anything (provided it's legal to import to the destination country)
can be and are moved arround the world by ship. The risks to the crew from
most cargos is probablly FAR FAR lower on a ship than on a plane due to a combination
of the sheer scale of a cargo ship, the fact weight is less of a factor meaning stuff
can be more heavilly built and the fact there is a ready supply of water for emergency
firefighting and decontamination.

The real question IMO is one of cost. Are the products in question worth the costs
involved (paperwork both by you and the shipping company, proffessional packaging,
dealing with customs etc) in shipping  them to your destination. And I suspect the answer
to that question is no

2012\04\30@202414 by Carl Denk

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Was said:

The risks to the crew from most cargos is probablly FAR FAR lower on a ship



Some years ago, daughter was scheduling ocean container shipping from origin > truck > rail > ocean ship > truck > destination

Hazardous containers were loaded on the ship, top, and outside. Occasionally a container would get "lost at sea". The word was, if a container caught fire, leaked hazardous material, etc. was just pushed overboard


'[OT] International Move - What materials are banne'
2012\05\03@173920 by David Harmon
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2012 22:52:09 +0100, Luis Moreira
<@spam@luis.moreira1575KILLspamspamgooglemail.com> wrote:
>Come on mate be reasonable, even in the UK the transport companies don't
>like to carry that stuff, why would you want to create problems on your
>move because of that? Just leave it behind, I am sure you will find r/c
>fuel in California.

R/C fuel is available both in bottles and bulk.  But you may want to
bring the cans.  Jerrycans are regulated, must have a DOT (Department of
Transportation) approved anti-spill valve on the filler in order to be
sold

2012\05\03@204146 by Tamas Rudnai

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Thanks guys for your help. Now I have sorted it out by donating the fuel
and the cans of other materials to the local RC club I was flying with.

Next thing to find out if my BMFA membership covers me insurance wise in
the US or need to join to AMA.

Tamas


On 3 May 2012 22:38, David Harmon <KILLspamrobocatKILLspamspampobox.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>

2012\05\04@085121 by John Ferrell

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Go to http://www.modelaircraft.org/
If they cannot help you with all of the details please let me know and I will find someone with experience in that area.
I had a successful business producing Precision Aerobatic Model Airplanes that were winners in International & Domestic Contests.
I gave that up in 1999 but many of my friends are still active in the sport..

Many of the answers to your questions are dependent on your anticipated length of stay and who is paying for the move.
If I were you, I would consider giving up fuel and transitioning to electric for many reasons.
You can buy a lot of airplane stuff for the cost of shipping.

On 5/3/2012 8:41 PM, Tamas Rudnai wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>> -

2012\05\05@052613 by Tamas Rudnai

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John,

Thank you very much for all of these info. This site is very useful and I
am surprised how many RC clubs are in San Diego area. It seems this sport
is very popular in the US :-)

Could you please explain why electric fly better than the IC one? Back in
Ireland I had a smaller electric plane (still have the motor, speed
controller, battery and charger, so I guess such transition would not be a
too big investment). However, I thought it was not as powerful as an IC
would be, or maybe I just had a too small motor?

Thanks,
Tamas


On 4 May 2012 13:51, John Ferrell <RemoveMEjferrell13spamTakeThisOuTtriad.rr.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2012\05\05@091732 by John Ferrell

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As far as flight parameters go both fuel and electric are pretty close in today's environment.
E planes are handicapped in competition because the rules require they be weighed with batteries in place. IC's are not weighed with fuel.
The E's are  more reliable and provide greater usable power with less vibration. Power control is immediate.
The absence of vibration allows a much lighter airframe than with an IC.  Fuel proof paint is not required. In fact, paint is not required.

If you go to Horizon Hobbies web site you will find a wide range of products that work. Electric flights usually are less that 8 minutes regardless of size.
I do have a 10 pound pattern plane but the batteries are expensive and I rarely fly it. I prefer the 3 cell Lipo's. The public perception is that electrics are safer. I disagree, A careless flyer will at some point allow an unplanned motor start. Danger to people and property.  An IC usually stops with a prop strike. A electric chews on what ever it encounters until power is removed.  I have had a speed controller catch fire.  I did manage to not burn the airplane up!

The Lipo's we use are bare cells. charge & discharge are up to the user. Too fast of either makes for a road flare. Best done outside!

Foamies are neat! Small fields are fine. Break it into pieces, glue it back together and fly some more.
No more nasty oil to deal with though!

On 5/5/2012 5:26 AM, Tamas Rudnai wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2012\05\05@182350 by Tamas Rudnai

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Thank you very much for the explanation John. For me right now the biggest
disadvantage of the IC engine is that even at idle speed it produce a
significant thrust which is not nice when landing. I could kill the engine
but then there would be no chance of restart if something goes wrong. With
electric I could shut the prop down completely which then pretty much
worked as an air brake.

Anyway, will give it a go again, thanks for the advice!

Tamas



On 5 May 2012 14:17, John Ferrell <EraseMEjferrell13spamspamspamBeGonetriad.rr.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>

2012\05\05@190309 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco
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Em 5/5/2012 10:17, John Ferrell escreveu:
> I do have a 10 pound pattern plane but the batteries are expensive and I
> rarely fly it. I prefer the 3 cell Lipo's. The public perception is that
> electrics are safer. I disagree, A careless flyer will at some point
> allow an unplanned motor start. Danger to people and property.  An IC
> usually stops with a prop strike. A electric chews on what ever it
> encounters until power is removed.


Not brushless motors with a good modern controller. Indeed, for a
brushless motor run, the controller has to do a damn lot of work.
If anything wrong happens, the motor simply stops, possibly blowing some
MOSFETS in the controller.
The good controllers will detect if the motor got stuck and stop it,
only restarting after the throttle is set to zero and up again.


>   I have had a speed controller catch
> fire.  I did manage to not burn the airplane up!
>
> The Lipo's we use are bare cells. charge & discharge are up to the user.
> Too fast of either makes for a road flare. Best done outside!


Early Lipos were much more dangerous than modern ones.

>
> Foamies are neat! Small fields are fine. Break it into pieces, glue it
> back together and fly some more.
> No more nasty oil to deal with though!

I agree!


Isaac

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