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'[OT] Image stored in a single photon?'
2007\01\22@124934 by David VanHorn

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Could this be real?

http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2007/01/22/photon-storage.html

--
Feel the power of the dark side!  Atmel AVR

2007\01\22@130912 by Michael Rigby-Jones

picon face


>-----Original Message-----
>From: spam_OUTpiclist-bouncesTakeThisOuTspammit.edu [.....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu]
>On Behalf Of David VanHorn
>Sent: 22 January 2007 17:50
>To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
>Subject: [OT] Image stored in a single photon?
>
>
>Could this be real?
>
>http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2007/01/22/photon-storage.html

As the article says, it sounds impossible.

(Just for context the 'UR' is a small pixelated image of the letters U and R for Rochester University)

"The UR was made by sending a single photon through a stencil with U and R etched out. The photon carried the shadow of the UR with it into a cell of cesium gas, where it was slowed and compressed, so many pulses could be held there at the same time."

I've almost certainly misunderstood this quote, but how can a mask possibly cause a single photon to cast a shadow?  A shadow is just the contrast between high and low light areas, so with a single photon how can the shape of this area be defined?

Regards

Mike

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2007\01\22@131057 by Marc Nicholas

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Given that I was recently told you can "reconstruct" an image from a single
photon camera-- possibly!

*How* is a different matter ;-)

-marc

On 1/22/07, David VanHorn <dvanhornspamKILLspammicrobrix.com> wrote:
>
> Could this be real?
>
> http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2007/01/22/photon-storage.html
>
> --
> Feel the power of the dark side!  Atmel AVR
> -

2007\01\22@132757 by Alex Harford

face picon face
On 1/22/07, Michael Rigby-Jones <.....Michael.Rigby-JonesKILLspamspam.....bookham.com> wrote:

>
> I've almost certainly misunderstood this quote, but how can a mask possibly cause a single photon to cast a shadow?  A shadow is just the contrast between high and low light areas, so with a single photon how can the shape of this area be defined?

Sounds like the single photon expermient:

http://www.physique.ens-cachan.fr/franges_photon/index.htm

It's not a particle, it's a wave-particle duality.

Alex

2007\01\22@132941 by David VanHorn

picon face
>
>
> I've almost certainly misunderstood this quote, but how can a mask
> possibly cause a single photon to cast a shadow?  A shadow is just the
> contrast between high and low light areas, so with a single photon how can
> the shape of this area be defined?


Sounds like a relative of the two-slit experiment, in some ways.

2007\01\22@141654 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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>-----Original Message-----
>From: EraseMEpiclist-bouncesspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu [piclist-bouncesspamspam_OUTmit.edu]
>On Behalf Of David VanHorn
>Sent: 22 January 2007 18:29
>To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
>Subject: Re: [OT] Image stored in a single photon?
>
>
>>
>>
>> I've almost certainly misunderstood this quote, but how can a mask
>> possibly cause a single photon to cast a shadow?  A shadow
>is just the
>> contrast between high and low light areas, so with a single
>photon how
>> can the shape of this area be defined?
>
>
>Sounds like a relative of the two-slit experiment, in some ways.

Would you not need more than one photon to create interference?

Regards

Mike

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not make any use of this information, or copy or show it to any
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2007\01\22@142736 by William Chops Westfield

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On Jan 22, 2007, at 9:49 AM, David VanHorn wrote:

> Could this be real?
> http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2007/01/22/photon-storage.html
>
Me thinks the reporter is somewhat confused.  More details here:

<http://www.science.rochester.edu/depts/physics/archives/
physics_012207.html>

BillW

2007\01\22@143030 by Alex Harford

face picon face
On 1/22/07, Michael Rigby-Jones <@spam@Michael.Rigby-JonesKILLspamspambookham.com> wrote:
>
> >Sounds like a relative of the two-slit experiment, in some ways.
>
> Would you not need more than one photon to create interference?

No, because it's acting as a wave in this case.

Alex

2007\01\22@143306 by M. Adam Davis

face picon face
On 1/22/07, Michael Rigby-Jones <KILLspamMichael.Rigby-JonesKILLspamspambookham.com> wrote:
>
> >Sounds like a relative of the two-slit experiment, in some ways.
>
> Would you not need more than one photon to create interference?

Interference is caused by waves, not photons.  Which leads to the
question - does a single photon have/represent several waves that
could interfere, or is it considered a single wave that becomes
several waves on the other side of the pattern, but is still merely a
single photon?

-Adam

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2007\01\22@145207 by David VanHorn

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>
> Me thinks the reporter is somewhat confused.  More details here:
>
> <www.science.rochester.edu/depts/physics/archives/
> physics_012207.html>


Yes, it seems that things got just a BIT distorted..
Oh well..

:)

2007\01\22@145555 by Tobias Gogolin

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To me it proves my theory that the photon travels back and forth through
time and passes the scanned object more than once in the moment that it
establishes this 'standing wave'...

On 1/22/07, Alex Harford <RemoveMEharfordTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
>
> On 1/22/07, Michael Rigby-Jones <spamBeGoneMichael.Rigby-JonesspamBeGonespambookham.com> wrote:
> >
> > >Sounds like a relative of the two-slit experiment, in some ways.
> >
> > Would you not need more than one photon to create interference?
>
> No, because it's acting as a wave in this case.
>
> Alex
> -

2007\01\23@102315 by Luis.Moreira

picon face
No, Not really.

See:
http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=5792



This is where the story started.

scitation.aip.org/getpdf/servlet/GetPDFServlet?filetype=pdf&id=PR
LTAO000098000004043902000001&idtype=cvips&prog=normal




-----Original Message-----
From: TakeThisOuTpiclist-bouncesEraseMEspamspam_OUTmit.edu [RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu] On Behalf
Of David VanHorn
Sent: 22 January 2007 17:50
To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
Subject: [OT] Image stored in a single photon?

Could this be real?

http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2007/01/22/photon-storage.html

--
Feel the power of the dark side!  Atmel AVR

2007\01\24@034752 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> Given that I was recently told you can "reconstruct" an image from a
> single
> photon camera-- possibly!
>
> *How* is a different matter ;-)

It's a simple and logical consequence of quantum  mechanics. At each
possible decision point the universe divides into multiple versions
which in turn divide into ... as required, until there are enough
universes carrying enough information to store the image. Seems a bit
of an extreme waste of universes just to ge get a holiday snapshot
though.

The same principle is used by quantum computers to carry out
calculations that under ordinary conditions would require more
iterations than could, by many magnitudes, have been carried out
during the whole life ( where 6500 years < Life < 20 billion years) of
the universe to date. It still takes just as much resource with a
quantum computer but you are using the resources of all those
universes in parallel. Or, it will do when they find out how to
actually build a quantum computer.

If any of the above sounds like bunkum (hopefully it does :-)) then

- How can a single photon provide such an image?

- How can a quantum computer achieve what its proponents expect to
achieve?

The latter especially seems particularly bizzarre. But there doesn't
seem to be any more logical one on offer. And, after all, QM works
superbly but doesn't make any logical sense at all anyway, so why
should this aspect of it do so.  ? :-)


       Russell






2007\01\24@041304 by Jinx

face picon face

> universes carrying enough information to store the image. Seems a bit
> of an extreme waste of universes just to ge get a holiday snapshot
> though.

Who says our universe isn't being used by someone/thing else currently ?

At this very moment we could be part of a slide-show illustrating how the
Grand Imperial Forces subjugated Omega Persii 8. Again

2007\01\24@043624 by Dario Greggio

face picon face
You know Star Trek TNG's "Parallels" of course...
:-)
--
Ciao, Dario

2007\01\24@045139 by Tony Smith

picon face
> > universes carrying enough information to store the image.
> Seems a bit
> > of an extreme waste of universes just to ge get a holiday snapshot
> > though.
>
> Who says our universe isn't being used by someone/thing else
> currently ?
>
> At this very moment we could be part of a slide-show
> illustrating how the Grand Imperial Forces subjugated Omega
> Persii 8. Again


More likely an advertisement for poppers.

Mmmmmmmm poppers...

Tony

2007\01\24@120639 by Mike Hord

picon face
> > universes carrying enough information to store the image. Seems a bit
> > of an extreme waste of universes just to ge get a holiday snapshot
> > though.
>
> Who says our universe isn't being used by someone/thing else currently ?
>
> At this very moment we could be part of a slide-show illustrating how the
> Grand Imperial Forces subjugated Omega Persii 8. Again

There is of course the theory that if anyone figures out exactly why the
universe is as it is, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something
even more bizarre.

There is another theory that this has already happened.

Mike H.

2007\01\24@222008 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
I was under the impression that the "double slit experiment" worked as follows:

Any single photon will go through only ONE slit. However, if you send
MANY photons through, the probability distribution of where they
impact behind the slit screen will have the same shape as the squared
magnitude of the intensity of the wave function you would expect from
diffraction.

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-slit_experiment#Quantum_version_of_experiment

Sean


On 1/24/07, Russell McMahon <apptechEraseMEspam.....paradise.net.nz> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2007\01\25@091743 by David VanHorn

picon face
>
> Any single photon will go through only ONE slit. However, if you send
> MANY photons through, the probability distribution of where they
> impact behind the slit screen will have the same shape as the squared
> magnitude of the intensity of the wave function you would expect from
> diffraction.


Correct.  And if you block either slit, you get exactly the pattern you'd
get if you were "shootin' bullets" as feynman said.

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