Searching \ for '[OT] I'm baaaaaack!' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=baaaaaack
Search entire site for: 'I'm baaaaaack!'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT] I'm baaaaaack!'
1999\07\19@121825 by Quentin

flavicon
face
Andy Kunz wrote:

>
> You can shoot them in NJ, too.  But they send you to jail for life for
> attempted murder and he's back on the street in a couple days.
>
Yup, same here in SA. Also, if you miss, they can prosecute you for
firing a weapon in a residential area. If you just injure him, the
criminal here can also make a case against you for man slaughter or
attempted murder. Wonder if Tjaart is OK ITR. Human Rights can have a
funny backlash on the inocent. There is a thing going around here in SA
about that the criminal got more legal rights than the victim.

So what's the moral of the story?
When you shoot, you better kill him, 'cause then you will have no
witnesses.
(Just a misquote, I don't even own a gun).

Quentin

1999\07\19@123908 by David W. Duley

picon face
In a message dated 7/19/99 9:19:07 AM Pacific Daylight Time, spam_OUTqscTakeThisOuTspamICON.CO.ZA
writes:

<<
>
> You can shoot them in NJ, too.  But they send you to jail for life for
> attempted murder and he's back on the street in a couple days.
>
Yup, same here in SA. Also, if you miss, they can prosecute you for
firing a weapon in a residential area. If you just injure him, the
criminal here can also make a case against you for man slaughter or
attempted murder. Wonder if Tjaart is OK ITR. Human Rights can have a
funny backlash on the inocent. There is a thing going around here in SA
about that the criminal got more legal rights than the victim.
 >>
In California you have to convince the burgler to shoot himself.

Dave

1999\07\19@124528 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>funny backlash on the inocent. There is a thing going around here in SA
>about that the criminal got more legal rights than the victim.

Here, too.  I'd hate to be a crime victim.  It's only the past five years
something has been done about it.   The US Supreme Court just recently
decided that "Megan's Law" (named after a girl murdered by a known violent
sex offender) is unconstitutional.

>When you shoot, you better kill him, 'cause then you will have no
>witnesses.

Yep.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
.....andyKILLspamspam@spam@rc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
andyspamKILLspammontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\07\19@130132 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>In California you have to convince the burgler to shoot himself.

What, and get blamed for causing a suicide?  Are you crazy (you need to
have a burglar answer that first)!

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
.....andyKILLspamspam.....rc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
EraseMEandyspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\07\19@130754 by Wagner Lipnharski

picon face
is there any brain-neuro-surgeon online?
I heard that exist a place at the human brain, a fresh memory system, we
(from electronics) can call it as a high speed cache, that when that
place is touched the person just lose all last memories from 12 to 72
hours... that thing exist as a way to, first, select what really matters
to store at the main memory, and second, to be able to do a "cache
clean" in case some very nasty happens to our life, as a terrible
accident or something like that you wount desire to keep remembering...
previous wife or so... <g>...  what about just invite the burgler to
dinner, and suddenly touch (by any means) the guy's part of the brain,
and then just give him a ride to the closest K-Mart or Wall-Mart...? a
non-violent solution, isn't?

1999\07\19@131205 by Adam Davis

flavicon
face
If I remember correctly, it's the hypthalamus, and it's in the center of the
brain.  If you touched that part, it'd be called 2nd degree murder...
-Adam

Wagner Lipnharski wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1999\07\19@131411 by ShadeDemon

picon face
Wagner Lipnharski wrote:
> dinner, and suddenly touch (by any means) the guy's part of the brain,

 I thought that's what Tjaart was trying to do with the
bullet?
Alan

1999\07\19@231214 by Russell McMahon

picon face
Electro convulsive therapy (ECT) achieves this.
Electrodes are applied to head and an electric shock is applied.
Knowing where and how much is a good idea before you try this :-).
Short term memory is zapped but longer term (chemical :-)) is not.

RM


{Original Message removed}

1999\07\20@020809 by Nigel Goodwin

flavicon
picon face
In message <37934FA6.F4E14DFBspamspam_OUTicon.co.za>, Quentin <@spam@qscKILLspamspamICON.CO.ZA>
writes
>Andy Kunz wrote:
>
>>
>> You can shoot them in NJ, too.  But they send you to jail for life for
>> attempted murder and he's back on the street in a couple days.
>>
>Yup, same here in SA. Also, if you miss, they can prosecute you for
>firing a weapon in a residential area. If you just injure him, the
>criminal here can also make a case against you for man slaughter or
>attempted murder. Wonder if Tjaart is OK ITR. Human Rights can have a
>funny backlash on the inocent. There is a thing going around here in SA
>about that the criminal got more legal rights than the victim.
>
>So what's the moral of the story?
>When you shoot, you better kill him, 'cause then you will have no
>witnesses.
>(Just a misquote, I don't even own a gun).

Well in the UK you're not even allowed to own a gun (except licensed
shotguns), never mind fire one at some one!.

As a practising martial artist we train NEVER to call the police, just
leave the body (dead or otherwise!) and run away :-).

My wife's cousins husband was attacked a couple of years ago taking
money out of a bank cash machine late at night, he thumped the attempted
muggers and they ran away!. Being a law abiding citizen he immediately
went to report the crime at the nearest police station, where he was
informed that if the muggers reported him he would be arrested for
assault!.

That's why we train to make a mess of the basta*ds and disappear :-).
--

Nigel.

       /--------------------------------------------------------------\
       | Nigel Goodwin   | Internet : KILLspamnigelgKILLspamspamlpilsley.demon.co.uk     |
       | Lower Pilsley   | Web Page : http://www.lpilsley.demon.co.uk |
       | Chesterfield    | Official site for Shin Ki and New Spirit   |
       | England         |                 Ju Jitsu                   |
       \--------------------------------------------------------------/

1999\07\20@114617 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>As a practising martial artist we train NEVER to call the police, just
>leave the body (dead or otherwise!) and run away :-).

Good policy.

>muggers and they ran away!. Being a law abiding citizen he immediately
>went to report the crime at the nearest police station, where he was
>informed that if the muggers reported him he would be arrested for
>assault!.

Sounds like New York!

>That's why we train to make a mess of the basta*ds and disappear :-).

What a stupid world we live in.  When is the next bus for Mars leaving?

Andy
==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
RemoveMEandyTakeThisOuTspamrc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
spamBeGoneandyspamBeGonespammontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\07\21@020110 by Nigel Goodwin

flavicon
picon face
In message <TakeThisOuT4.1.19990720114316.00943400EraseMEspamspam_OUTpop.fast.net>, Andy Kunz
<RemoveMEsupportspamTakeThisOuTMONTANADESIGN.COM> writes
>What a stupid world we live in.  When is the next bus for Mars leaving?

You should know!, if it's going from anywhere I suspect it'll be your
side of the Atlantic :-). (I bet it has PIC's on board as well!).
--

Nigel.

       /--------------------------------------------------------------\
       | Nigel Goodwin   | Internet : nigelgEraseMEspam.....lpilsley.demon.co.uk     |
       | Lower Pilsley   | Web Page : http://www.lpilsley.demon.co.uk |
       | Chesterfield    | Official site for Shin Ki and New Spirit   |
       | England         |                 Ju Jitsu                   |
       \--------------------------------------------------------------/

1999\07\21@084617 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>>What a stupid world we live in.  When is the next bus for Mars leaving?
>
>You should know!, if it's going from anywhere I suspect it'll be your
>side of the Atlantic :-). (I bet it has PIC's on board as well!).

Actually, I think it leaves from California.  On the Left Side of the
country <G>.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
EraseMEandyspamrc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
RemoveMEandyEraseMEspamEraseMEmontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\07\21@171515 by Chris Eddy

flavicon
face
Andy Kunz  wrote;
>>What a stupid world we live in.  When is the next bus for Mars leaving?
>
> Nigel wrote;
>You should know!, if it's going from anywhere I suspect it'll be your
>side of the Atlantic :-). (I bet it has PIC's on board as well!).
>--
The first operational (read actually worked) ballistic rocket (read leaves
the atmosphere and returns) was of course the German V2, which was built by
Von Braun and many others.  The guidance was a tube circuit that mixed (they
called it a mixing circuit) the gyro and vane position signals and generated
servo signals for positioning the vanes.  I bet that we can get that to work
with a PIC.  Possibly an 8 pin device.  Mars is a bit more complicated, that
might be a bit tougher.  But we certainly can loft a body to space with a
PIC.  I bet that would be great PR.

Chris Eddy

1999\07\21@173805 by Greg Wiley

picon face
> The first operational (read actually worked) ballistic rocket (read leaves
> the atmosphere and returns) was of course the German V2, which was built
by
> Von Braun and many others.  The guidance was a tube circuit that mixed
(they
> called it a mixing circuit) the gyro and vane position signals and
generated
> servo signals for positioning the vanes.  I bet that we can get that to
work
> with a PIC.

I recall reading an article about a planned amateur space
launch.  The engineer interviewed said that they had found
all kinds of uses for Basic Stamps in the project.  I don't
remember if they were using them on-board or not.

And wasn't there a segment on The Muppet Show called,
"PICs in Space?" (sorry)

 -greg

1999\07\21@173818 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>might be a bit tougher.  But we certainly can loft a body to space with a
>PIC.  I bet that would be great PR.

Yup.  Use one of those micromachine turbines for low altitude followed by a
micromachined rocket for final boost.

We can probably do it in a matchbox.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
RemoveMEandyspam_OUTspamKILLspamrc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
RemoveMEandyTakeThisOuTspamspammontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\07\21@174214 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>And wasn't there a segment on The Muppet Show called,
>"PICs in Space?" (sorry)

Hey, Greg, that was about the level of the punmanship they had on that show.

I loved it!

If I still had a TV it would definitely be on the "must watch" list.  Along
with "The Simpsons."

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
EraseMEandyspamspamspamBeGonerc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
RemoveMEandyKILLspamspammontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\07\21@175051 by Dan Tye

flavicon
face
PICs in space, of course, wouldn't be anything without Miss PICcy.....

I think Miss PICcy should be on a Tshirt....

-dan


I recall reading an article about a planned amateur space
launch.  The engineer interviewed said that they had found
all kinds of uses for Basic Stamps in the project.  I don't
remember if they were using them on-board or not.

And wasn't there a segment on The Muppet Show called,
"PICs in Space?" (sorry)

 -greg

1999\07\21@190212 by Eric Oliver

flavicon
face
>  I bet that we can get that to work
> with a PIC.  Possibly an 8 pin device.  Mars is a bit more complicated, that
> might be a bit tougher.  But we certainly can loft a body to space with a
> PIC.  I bet that would be great PR.
>

Who's body ? Any volunteers ... <g>

1999\07\21@191919 by Tony Nixon

flavicon
picon face
Eric Oliver wrote:

> Who's body ? Any volunteers ... <g>

You'd need more than a PIC and a micro machined turbo to get my bod off
the ground :-)

--
Best regards

Tony

'The Engine' - Design your own programmer.

http://www.picnpoke.com
Email picnpokeSTOPspamspamspam_OUTcdi.com.au

1999\07\21@194745 by Gennette Bruce

flavicon
face
Your wrong about California being the on the left side of the USA. Here in
Australia we turn the maps (what to you would seem) up-side-down and
therefor California is on the right (correct) side of America.

Bye.

       {Original Message removed}

1999\07\21@200452 by Wagner Lipnharski

picon face
... you just turn the map or the map is printed that way?

... then, follow some american tradition that say "Things went South"
when something goes wrong (meaning things went "down"), how do you say
it? "Things went North"?  hehe

... how do you justify the water spinning clockwise (south of equator)
when you flush the toilete, if your map is upside down?

... ok, now I got curious... is your pocket compass needle pointing to
north ... or south? (according to the map) hehe

Wagner.


Gennette Bruce wrote:
>
> Your wrong about California being the on the left side of the USA. Here in
> Australia we turn the maps (what to you would seem) up-side-down and
> therefor California is on the right (correct) side of America.

1999\07\21@201527 by Greg Brault

picon face
Wagner Lipnharski wrote:
>

> ... how do you justify the water spinning clockwise (south of equator)
> when you flush the toilete, if your map is upside down?
>


Actually, that's a common misconception... the water does not flush
opposite ways north/south of equator.

Greg

1999\07\21@210609 by Wagner Lipnharski

picon face
Free fall, or lack of gravity, pull the mass to the center of the bigger
mass's gravity, in this case, the center of the earth. Suppose the
planet is not spinning, then it doesn't matter the location of the water
to be +n or -n from the equator, read here "higher velocity surface
point", where "n" is a reference to the "hand" rotation speed and
direction.

With the planet spinning, it creates the +n and -n reference to the
highest speed surface point (equator), a free fall in this situation
would generate a long and delicate curve. This effect is also
pronnounced by the fact that the portion of the same water close to the
equator is faster than the opposite.

Even the water in a cup, the side of the cup towards the equator has a
bigger "n" independent to the "n" signal (+or-) what means few
millimeters per hour of difference. In a free fall it tends to rotate
since the +n and -n reference to the speed is lost and that speed
diference is transformed in kinetic energy.

Of course it is a joke, since toilete flushes according to the direction
of the water vents, not because the earth equator's related position,
but if you take a large perfect round tank with stable water and just
open a perfect drain hole at the bottom, after some time it would
generate a rotation, and its is not randomic. There are some
calculations (I am not expert on this) to reach the different speeds of
rotation according to the height of the water column, faster close to
the hole.

I wonder what would happens to this effect if the planet was a spinning
cylinder, not a sphere, when all the curved surface would be at the same
rotational speed...  at least we would have a better map. :)

Wagner

Greg Brault wrote:

> Actually, that's a common misconception... the water does not flush
> opposite ways north/south of equator.
>
> Greg

1999\07\22@004603 by paulb

flavicon
face
Andy Kunz wrote:

> If I still had a TV it would definitely be on the "must watch" list.
>  Along with "The Simpsons."

 The Simpsons?  I would have thought that a bit sacreligious for you,
Andy?

Wagner Lipnharski wrote:

> I wonder what would happens to this effect if the planet was a
> spinning cylinder, not a sphere, when all the curved surface would be
> at the same rotational speed...  at least we would have a better map.

 The map may be better, though it would be in three parts ;-)

 The Coriolis effect would however be the same.  Can you see why?
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.
 {Just working my way through Don Stoner's book "A New Look at an Old
Earth" which debunks Creation (Pseudo-)Science.}

1999\07\22@051516 by g.daniel.invent.design

flavicon
face
Greg Brault wrote:
>
> Wagner Lipnharski wrote:
> >
>
> > ... how do you justify the water spinning clockwise (south of equator)
> > when you flush the toilete, if your map is upside down?
> >
>
> Actually, that's a common misconception... the water does not flush
> opposite ways north/south of equator.
>
> Greg

"corollis force", earth's surface travels on average faster at equator
than at more polar positions, giving in to gravity means more loss of
speed on equatorial side of plug hole. Now u can work out which way the
earth spinz !


--
Steam engines may be out of fashion, but when you consider that an
internal combustion engine would require recovery of waste heat by
transfer just before top dead centre then fashion becomes rather
redundant, USE STRATIFIED HEAT EXCHANGERS ! and external combustion.

You heard it first from: Graham Daniel, managing director of Electronic
Product Enhancements.
Phone NZ 04 387 4347, Fax NZ 04 3874348, Cellular NZ 021 954 196.

1999\07\22@053158 by g.daniel.invent.design

flavicon
face
Wagner Lipnharski wrote:
<<big cut>>
> I wonder what would happens to this effect if the planet was a spinning
> cylinder, not a sphere, when all the curved surface would be at the same
> rotational speed...  at least we would have a better map. :)
>
> Wagner

surface velocity would be constant but centre of mass would be at middle
of cylinder, not an axis. As a result, mass falling near middle of
cylinder would fall faster and loose speed more rapidly. Therefore,
circulation vortex outer flow direction would be against cylinder
rotation at middle of cylinder and with cylinder rotation at ends.

As a thought experiment: Consider a skinny torus rotating on an axis at
right angles to the earth's axis ie passing through the poles, of radius
greater than the earth's. Essentially a gyroscope. now provide bearings
and a gear system or other to collect energy off the earth's rotation
relative to the plane of the torus's greater circle. Energy for all
until humanity is not as we know it ?

regards,
Graham daniel.

1999\07\22@080741 by Tom Handley

picon face
At 05:36 PM 7/21/99 -0400, Andy Kunz wrote:
>>might be a bit tougher.  But we certainly can loft a body to space with a
>>PIC.  I bet that would be great PR.
>
>Yup.  Use one of those micromachine turbines for low altitude followed by a
>micromachined rocket for final boost.
>
>We can probably do it in a matchbox.

  Andy, did you take a look at that article in AW&ST that Myke mentioned?
It really is incredible where the technology has gone. This is right down
your alley even though it's not a boat ;-)

  In addition to the more conventional micro UAVs, the insect-like Microbat
"ornithopter" was really interesting. The 6-inch span, flapping craft, flew
18 seconds and around 50 yards before the NiCads were exhausted. The flap
rate is 20Hz. According to Matthew Keennon, from AeroVironment, "as the
weakened craft lies flopping in the grass, sparrows land next to it. They
seem to be looking after their fallen comrade". I can imagine this
technology being reduced to the insect level which reminds me, I had around
50 confirmed mosquito kills last night ;-)

>Andy
>
>==================================================================
>Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
>------------------------------------------------------------------
>spamBeGoneandySTOPspamspamEraseMErc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
>KILLspamandyspamBeGonespammontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
>==================================================================

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom Handley
New Age Communications
Since '75 before "New Age" and no one around here is waiting for UFOs ;-)

1999\07\22@090447 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
At 09:46 AM 7/22/99 +1000, you wrote:
>Your wrong about California being the on the left side of the USA. Here in
>Australia we turn the maps (what to you would seem) up-side-down and
>therefor California is on the right (correct) side of America.

But you're on the bottom of the world.

Maybe you're all so ugly because that isn't your FACE that's sticking out
of your shirt. <G>

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
EraseMEandyspamEraseMErc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
@spam@andy@spam@spamspam_OUTmontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\07\22@090451 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
At 02:44 PM 7/22/99 +1000, you wrote:
>Andy Kunz wrote:
>
>> If I still had a TV it would definitely be on the "must watch" list.
>>  Along with "The Simpsons."
>
>  The Simpsons?  I would have thought that a bit sacreligious for you,
>Andy?

They may push the limit, but they really are a "family-oriented" program.
Homer always goes through all kinds of stuff, struggling with what he WANTS
to do and what he KNOWS is right.  In the end, he usually does RIGHT.

I don't own a TV, so this is just from the episodes I watch at work and in
the maternity ward.  Last time I was there (2 months ago) the nurses knew
who we were.  Our room (526) was taken so we were put into a suite instead.

Andy
==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
spamBeGoneandyspamKILLspamrc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
.....andyspam_OUTspammontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\07\22@090456 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>   Andy, did you take a look at that article in AW&ST that Myke mentioned?

Yep, that's what I was referring to.

>It really is incredible where the technology has gone. This is right down
>your alley even though it's not a boat ;-)

Some day I expect to be allowed to run turbines in boats.  Right now, I
have to settle for 60K RPM electric motors, which sound an awful lot like a
real boat.

>   In addition to the more conventional micro UAVs, the insect-like Microbat

The micro UAVs the military has are really something.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
TakeThisOuTandy.....spamTakeThisOuTrc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
TakeThisOuTandyKILLspamspamspammontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\07\22@101612 by Matt Bonner

flavicon
face
Wagner Lipnharski wrote:
>
> ... you just turn the map or the map is printed that way?

It's printed that way.

> > Your wrong about California being the on the left side of the USA. Here in
> > Australia we turn the maps (what to you would seem) up-side-down and
> > therefor California is on the right (correct) side of America.

My first boss in the electronics biz was from New Zealand.  She had a
map posted in the coffee room that was exactly as Gennette described.
It was sure was difficult trying to locate anything on that map.

--Matt

1999\07\22@101837 by Dan Larson

flavicon
face
On Thu, 22 Jul 1999 09:46:55 +1000, Gennette Bruce wrote:

>Your wrong about California being the on the left side of the USA. Here in
>Australia we turn the maps (what to you would seem) up-side-down and
>therefor California is on the right (correct) side of America.

Well, to me, California is on the "left" coast and New York is on the
"right" coast.  It is more of a political alignment than anything... <G>

Dan

1999\07\22@112339 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>>Your wrong about California being the on the left side of the USA. Here in
>>Australia we turn the maps (what to you would seem) up-side-down and
>>therefor California is on the right (correct) side of America.
>
>Well, to me, California is on the "left" coast and New York is on the
>"right" coast.  It is more of a political alignment than anything... <G>

That's my understanding.  (My wife listens to Rush).

The problem is, Massachusetts is pretty left as well, and if Billary gets
elected to Senate, NY is going to go down the drain too and pop back out on
the left coast with California.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
.....andyspamRemoveMErc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
RemoveMEandyspamspamBeGonemontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\07\22@165525 by Robert M. McClure

flavicon
face
At 11:19 AM 7/22/99 -0400, you wrote:
>>>Your wrong about California being the on the left side of the USA. Here in
>>>Australia we turn the maps (what to you would seem) up-side-down and
>>>therefor California is on the right (correct) side of America.
>>
>>Well, to me, California is on the "left" coast and New York is on the
>>"right" coast.  It is more of a political alignment than anything... <G>
>
>That's my understanding.  (My wife listens to Rush).
>
>The problem is, Massachusetts is pretty left as well, and if Billary gets
>elected to Senate, NY is going to go down the drain too and pop back out on
>the left coast with California.
>
>Andy

I too have a wife who listens to Rush.  He is just a hair too far to the
left for me. since I stand somewhere to the right of Genghis Khan and
Attila the
Hun.  As far as I am concerned, most (but not quite all) of the ills of
society are traceable to lack of individual responsibility and the desire
of the liberal left to have the government look after us.

Bob McClure

1999\07\22@175122 by Kevin

flavicon
face
I too listen to Rush, great band, great music - Oh, you mean .. I got
yah, never mind ;) Back on topic.........


"Robert M. McClure" wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1999\07\22@180336 by paulb

flavicon
face
Isn't politics remarkable?

 I recall when I was still in school and thought government was about
managing a country and looking after the people, providing services such
as transport, medical care etc...

 Our pollies, colourful though they be, have mostly been eccentric in
proportion to our scale to the world.  We just sit and marvel at the
sheer breathtaking scope of presidents elected on the basis of their
career in the movies, their prowess as an adulterer (with the staff
allocated them), or the vision of election to the senate on the basis of
sympathy for the wife of such a former.

 Isn't politics remarkable?
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\07\22@183627 by Dennis Plunkett

flavicon
face
At 08:53 22/07/99 -0400, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Paul Hogan once asked the question if a compass points north, indicating a
large heavy lump of metal, then maybe the world has actually fliped over
and Australia is on top! :)

Dennis

1999\07\22@193057 by Clyde Smith-Stubbs

flavicon
face
On Thu, Jul 22, 1999 at 08:57:41AM -0400, Andy Kunz wrote:

> I don't own a TV, so this is just from the episodes I watch at work and in
> the maternity ward.  Last time I was there (2 months ago) the nurses knew
> who we were.  Our room (526) was taken so we were put into a suite instead.

Listen, Andy, email me privately and I'll tell you what's causing it. I found
out after number 6.


--
Clyde Smith-Stubbs               |            HI-TECH Software
Email: clydeEraseMEspamhtsoft.com          |          Phone            Fax
WWW:   http://www.htsoft.com/    | USA: (408) 490 2885  (408) 490 2885
PGP:   finger RemoveMEclydeEraseMEspamspam_OUThtsoft.com   | AUS: +61 7 3355 8333 +61 7 3355 8334
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
HI-TECH C: compiling the real world.

1999\07\22@195212 by Bob Drzyzgula

flavicon
face
I normally try to stay out of these discussions, but,
intending no defense of Clinton whatsoever:

<rant on>

Paul,

The primary thing that disturbs me about the parade of
folly you allude to is the pathological appetite that
the public seems to have acquired for dirt on our civil
servants. The media has morphed into a dirt-fueled machine
that cannot survive without a steady supply thereof, and
there appear to be virtually no bounds on the severity of
error or indiscretion that must be reported. Who among us
would survive such scrutiny untarnished?

What I cannot for the life of me now understand is why
on earth any but the most reckless, strong-willed and
power-hungry among us would ever want to subject themselves
to the trial-by-fire that is now required of any candidate
for public office.  And if you accept this as necessarily
a rhetorical question, then it should be no surprise to
anyone that we wind up with reckless, strong-willed and
power-hungry politicians.

Seek, and ye shall find. I think that if the people want
better choices, then they need to (a) give decent but
imperfect people some breathing room to run for office,
and (b) have the courage to offer them decent pay. The
gap between public and private salaries at top management
levels is inexcusable. Skilled, creative senior managers
within government can increase their annual incomes tenfold
simply by entering the private sector. The implications of
this should be obvious.

--Bob

BTW, I would be very surprised if more than a very few
people voted for Clinton because of his indescretions.
I think that, astonishing as this may seem, many if not
most people placed a higher importance on policy issues,
whether or not you agree with their choice.  Many others
seem to have simply felt that the alternatives sucked
even worse.

<rant off>

Disclosure: I do work for a US government agency,
but I am very happy with my pay, my job and with my
managers. Yes, I'm lucky in that way. Before anyone
asks, I always post from a private account to help
make it clear that my words in no way represent
the views of my employer.

On Fri, Jul 23, 1999 at 08:01:52AM +1000, Paul B. Webster VK2BZC wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
============================================================
Bob Drzyzgula                             It's not a problem
@spam@bobRemoveMEspamEraseMEdrzyzgula.org                until something bad happens
============================================================

1999\07\22@204635 by Anne Ogborn

flavicon
face
> The first operational (read actually worked) ballistic rocket (read leaves
> the atmosphere and returns) was of course the German V2, which was built by
> Von Braun and many others.  The guidance was a tube circuit that mixed (they
> called it a mixing circuit) the gyro and vane position signals and generated
> servo signals for positioning the vanes.  I bet that we can get that to work
> with a PIC.  Possibly an 8 pin device.  Mars is a bit more complicated, that
> might be a bit tougher.  But we certainly can loft a body to space with a
> PIC.  I bet that would be great PR.
>
> Chris Eddy

I once held an Apollo flight computer in my hands. It was a pretty crude device
-
you keyed in the program by hand (had those big "arthritis" buttons, so it could
be worked in a space suit). It was < 1K memory, so I'd say any pic except maybe
a
12C508 would probably outrun it.
Definitely they'd work faster.
It was extremely solidly built - basicly they'd encapsulated the board, and that
was
in a milled aluminum case that form-fit the encapsulant. It was about 6" x 6" x
4",
and felt like a solid aluminum block.
If memory serves it was LCD screen.

--
Anniepoo
Need loco motors?
http://www.idiom.com/~anniepoo/depot/motors.html

1999\07\22@221208 by Sean H. Breheny

face picon face
Hi Paul,

Politics is truely remarkable,in an awful way,as you point out. However bad
our choice of presidents is, I do have to say one thing about your
comments. I do not believe that Ronald Regan was elected just because he
had been in the movies. He wasn't a super star, it had been a long time
since he was famous in the movies, AND he had a previous political career
as governor of the state of California, which has the most electoral votes
of any state in the union.

Sean

At 08:01 AM 7/23/99 +1000, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

| Sean Breheny
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM
| Electrical Engineering Student
\--------------=----------------
Save lives, please look at http://www.all.org
Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
EraseMEshb7spam@spam@cornell.edu ICQ #: 3329174
________________________________________________________
NetZero - We believe in a FREE Internet.  Shouldn't you?
Get your FREE Internet Access and Email at
http://www.netzero.net/download/index.html

1999\07\23@003250 by Eric Oliver

flavicon
face
Reagan was not perfect for sure.  They called him 'The Great Communicator'.
I'm sure his acting career helped in that regard. My mom once told me that
if she had to pick one thing that Reagan did during his term above all
others it was that he made Americans proud to be Americans again. He had a
way about him that I, in my short life, had never seen before. I know he
wasn't perfect, but he was/is a great man.

I'm no fan of Clinton, but I find it hard to throw stones. I will say that
of the many words I would use to describe a great leader : honesty,
intergrity, conviction, wisdom, to name a few, I would find it hard to use
any of those to describe Clinton.

Eric

On Thursday, July 22, 1999 9:10 PM, Sean H. Breheny [SMTP:@spam@shb7spam_OUTspam.....CORNELL.EDU]
wrote:
> Hi Paul,
>
> Politics is truely remarkable,in an awful way,as you point out. However
bad
> our choice of presidents is, I do have to say one thing about your
> comments. I do not believe that Ronald Regan was elected just because he
> had been in the movies. He wasn't a super star, it had been a long time
> since he was famous in the movies, AND he had a previous political career
> as governor of the state of California, which has the most electoral
votes
{Quote hidden}

1999\07\23@084450 by g.daniel.invent.design

flavicon
face
left / right / wrong:

Robert M. McClure wrote:
> I too have a wife who listens to Rush.  He is just a hair too far to the
> left for me. since I stand somewhere to the right of Genghis Khan and
> Attila the
> Hun.  As far as I am concerned, most (but not quite all) of the ills of
> society are traceable to lack of individual responsibility and the desire
> of the liberal left to have the government look after us.
>
> Bob McClure

A society in which predation is abolished must by definition be ill as
evolution is not only halted, but can slide backwards.  Fortunately for
Mr Andy Kunz(for example), his religion preaches the go forth and
multiply message, a message which Andy has practiced with fervour.   The
sigma curve is used in biology to describe the population
explosion/dieback occurance.   I wonder if we have been wrong in
Wellington, N.Z. to have adopted the cockroach as a Y2K mascott, seems
that Andy could make a case for a different application of it.

overpopulation signs:
*rainforests*global warming*nuclear
fallout*genocide*extinctions*polution*

Noah whoa! Gaia (dumb or not) has reason to deliver a disaster on us,
religious people should now begin the next series of sacred writings on
how "God" was very displeased and ... (greatly chastised us and "saved"
a faithfull select few etc...)

Certainly Cockroaches and Catholics will have the numbers to optimise
survival potential of a major global disaster, and I'll bet that the
cockroaches won't be needing any divine intervention from any particular
#God.

My message ? Life must be earned, not owed to us. Bring back the
sabretooth tiger, lose the long range weapons. Ask a Dodo, Moa etc,
silence talks to careful listeners.
Graham Daniel.

1999\07\23@085123 by g.daniel.invent.design

flavicon
face
Eric Oliver wrote:
<<cut>>
> I'm no fan of Clinton, but I find it hard to throw stones. I will say that
> of the many words I would use to describe a great leader : honesty,
> intergrity, conviction, wisdom, to name a few, I would find it hard to use
> any of those to describe Clinton.
>
> Eric

Oh Erik, be fair, he almost got the conviction !

1999\07\23@100621 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>Politics is truely remarkable,in an awful way,as you point out. However bad
>our choice of presidents is, I do have to say one thing about your
>comments. I do not believe that Ronald Regan was elected just because he
>had been in the movies. He wasn't a super star, it had been a long time
>since he was famous in the movies, AND he had a previous political career
>as governor of the state of California, which has the most electoral votes
>of any state in the union.

He also had a message of "things are looking better" - much better than the
gloomy "we must take away all your rights to save your childrens' future"
that we are hearing now.

Did you know that (I'm told this by investment bankers, so it could be
somewhat tainted) it takes about 8 years for political changes (taxes, etc)
to be truly felt in the marketplace.  If that's so, then we are just now
starting to reap the benefits of the Reagan Presidency.  8 years from now
is I guess we'll find out...

:-(

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
andyspamBeGonespamrc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
RemoveMEandy@spam@spamspamBeGonemontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\07\23@100623 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>Oh Erik, be fair, he almost got the conviction !

Still might - there's another trial on Whitewater brewing, and with Hubbels
guilty plea...

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
.....andy@spam@spamEraseMErc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
.....andyRemoveMEspammontanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

1999\07\23@115327 by Dave VanHorn

flavicon
face
> > The first operational (read actually worked) ballistic rocket (read
leaves
> > the atmosphere and returns) was of course the German V2, which was built
by
> > Von Braun and many others.  The guidance was a tube circuit that mixed
(they
> > called it a mixing circuit) the gyro and vane position signals and
generated
> > servo signals for positioning the vanes.  I bet that we can get that to
work
> > with a PIC.  Possibly an 8 pin device.  Mars is a bit more complicated,
that
> > might be a bit tougher.  But we certainly can loft a body to space with
a
> > PIC.  I bet that would be great PR.

A vectored thrust rocket was demonstrated last year at the NAR nationals
here in muncie. It used an optical horizon sensor.  I don't remember if he
used a processor at all though.

Sending anything with any appreciable mass to "space" (>100k') is quite a
challenge given current regs and rules. The current record for solid fuel is
up around 40k' and liquids put you into "amateur rocketry" so be prepared to
make a good friends with land owners in nevada. Also, you need FAA clearance
for the shot, which isn't as hard to get as you might imagine.

1999\07\23@143923 by Mark Willis

flavicon
face
Dave VanHorn wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I understand the local Amateur Rocketry guys here in WA state, launch
from Fort Lewis (a large Army place here just South of Tacoma.) Anywhere
you have a military firing range, etc., you possibly can get permission
to launch - such places TEND to already be considered "Restricted
Airspace" by the FAA etc., as you hardly want a mis-aimed 155 mm
Howitzer shell hitting a passing Cessna, much less a DC-10 or 747!
Haven't made it to go watch a launch, it sounds like a lot of fun
though.  I rather enjoy Model Rockets, will probably get into that again
some day <G>

Years ago, I went to a L5 society meeting in Los Angeles, one of the
most popular rooms was the film room where they were showing launch
malfunctions.  Same as we discuss glowing, smoking PICs, and exploding
caps, I think people want to learn from others' mistakes vicariously
<G>  That, or we're all nuts, or both.

 Mark

1999\07\23@151239 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>Years ago, I went to a L5 society meeting in Los Angeles, one of the
>most popular rooms was the film room where they were showing launch
>malfunctions.  Same as we discuss glowing, smoking PICs, and exploding
>caps, I think people want to learn from others' mistakes vicariously
><G>  That, or we're all nuts, or both.

For boat racers, we have a "Crash & Burn" tape.  Excellent footage.

"And they walked away."  ... Crying, usually.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
.....andySTOPspamspam@spam@rc-hydros.com      http://www.rc-hydros.com     - Race Boats
andyEraseMEspam@spam@montanadesign.com  http://www.montanadesign.com - Electronics
==================================================================

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1999 , 2000 only
- Today
- New search...