Searching \ for '[OT] How to desolder old components?' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=how+desolder+old
Search entire site for: 'How to desolder old components?'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT] How to desolder old components?'
1999\12\30@143141 by Ian Smith

flavicon
face
I have a number of useful chips on junk boards that I want
to use with some PIC Microcontrollers by Microchip, but am not
experienced on desoldering.  I know many boards are made with
lead solder, so I work in well ventilated areas.

Anyone know an easier way than prying ICs off while heating
the pins and still having a working chip at the end of it all?
Any solvents that eat solder? Maybe solvents that eat the
circuit board away? Some sort of oven arrangement? Magic?

On a related note.. anyone have tips on how to get the silicon
wafers out of dead ICs?  I have used tools to chip and scrape
away the black whatever and have about a dozen successes.  Yeah,
it took a long time, I destroyed a lot of (already dead) chips
and being slightly obsessive compulsive really helps after a
few hours of picking away at the case with a needle.  :-)
Perhaps something the (surprise!) eats away the case?

Happy New Year!

--
spam_OUTIanSmithTakeThisOuTspamerie.net

1999\12\30@143754 by Max Toole

picon face
In a message dated 12/30/99 2:32:15 PM Eastern Standard Time,
.....iansmithKILLspamspam@spam@NCINTER.NET writes:

> I have a number of useful chips on junk boards that I want
>  to use with some PIC Microcontrollers by Microchip, but am not
>  experienced on desoldering.  I know many boards are made with
>  lead solder, so I work in well ventilated areas.
>
>  Anyone know an easier way than prying ICs off while heating
>  the pins and still having a working chip at the end of it all?
>  Any solvents that eat solder? Maybe solvents that eat the
>  circuit board away? Some sort of oven arrangement? Magic?

You can get desoldering braid at Radio Shack.  It is cheap and works pretty
well.

Max

1999\12\30@151055 by bill

flavicon
face
> I know many boards are made with lead solder, so I work in well ventilated
> areas.

Practically all of them, in fact.

> Anyone know an easier way than prying ICs off while heating the pins and
> still having a working chip at the end of it all? Any solvents that eat
> solder? Maybe solvents that eat the circuit board away? Some sort of oven
> arrangement? Magic?

I've seen special soldering iron tips in catalogs that are shaped to
simultaneously heat all the pins on a particular package, like a 16
pin DIP, for example, but I've never actually used any of these.

I have used specially shaped nozzles on hot air soldering equipment
that direct the hot air to all the pins on a component, which can
then be plucked off with a vacuum pick or other instrument. These hot
air soldering stations are intended primarily for working with
surface mount devices. Unfortunately, hot air soldering stations are
much too expensive for most hobby use.

By far the easiest technique I've used for getting through-hole
components is to melt all the solder on the board by dipping the
bottom of the board into a large solder pot with a special tongs,
then quickly turning it over and banging it on a table, knocking
nearly all the parts off the board in one quick step. But large
solder pots are also something that hobbyists are unlikely to have
sitting around.

I have managed to remove parts by melting all the pins from the
bottom of the board with a small torch then banging the board on a
table to knock the part off. Success with this has been mixed because
the board and part get hotter than with the solder pot method
(probably because this takes longer) and because the burning PCB
epoxy makes lots of nasty fumes that are hard to avoid breathing.

The technique I most often use for removing a single through-hole
part is to use a solder sucker to desolder one pin at a time, then
loosen the individual pins from the walls of the holes using a
miniature screwdriver or other small pointed tool. This is time
consuming, but doesn't require any exotic tools and usually results
in a useable part. I generally only do this for expensive parts, or
parts that I'd have to wait a long time to get. Twenty cent chips
that are available at a local store just aren't worth the labor.


---
                                       Peace,
                                       William Kitchen

The future is ours to create.

1999\12\30@151101 by J Borgaard

flavicon
face
I've used a MAPP-gas torch with the electrically fired nozzle to do this.
The trick is to give the solder-side of the board no more than 1 second of
direct heat, and have constant pulling force on the component(s). The chip
will practically fall out, as all pins are heated at the same time. Bad
side: The board is destroyed, and adjacent components may over heat since
they are left in the board, which itself will be heated to temps sufficient
to fry the remaining components. Also, keep your fingers away from any holes
in the board which may allow the hot gasses to pass during heating - this
you learn quickly.

Soldering braid works, but can be useless on multi-layer boards with
ground/power planes that sink the heat from the legs you are desoldering.
Same with "solder suckers". The torch always works, subject to the mentioned
limitations.

JB

> {Original Message removed}

1999\12\30@151930 by Jinx
face picon face
SMT and (loosely) fitted DIP components can be got off by applying
heat to THE OTHER SIDE of the PCB with a hot air gun or small
blowtorch. Hold the board upside-down and they'll just drop off. Any
DIPs that are a tighter fit will need to be prised off. Watch your fingers
or you may find that YOU get pretty prised off yourself.

Some ICs will split in half with a chisel tap on the centre join line. Not
a very high success rate for a nice clean 50:50 split though, most tend
to end in tears. I tried a lot last year to get to the wafers for inclusion
in some polyester coasters. Guess it's in our interest that they're
stuck together well. Wonder who'd be the first to complain if our chips
were gettting damp ....... ?

Jinx

1999\12\30@154149 by Dave VanHorn

flavicon
face
> Soldering braid works, but can be useless on multi-layer boards with
> ground/power planes that sink the heat from the legs you are desoldering.
> Same with "solder suckers". The torch always works, subject to the
mentioned
> limitations.


Those "soldapults" I've always found useless, but I know others who can use
them to remove and replace anything with thruhole leads and the work looks
great. I guess I just don't have the knack..

I have a pace micro portable desoldering station, and with that, I can get
anything out.

The torch method works, just use a thin screwdriver or maybe 0.020 shim
stock to gently lift the chip out.

1999\12\30@154827 by TIM

flavicon
face
the only real luck that i had doing this sort of thing is water based liquid
flux.......kestler product....hand pump
de soldering pump....manual kind...a 33 watt element.......not to destry the
ic's from heat......and a little fan blowing away from the board as not to
cool of the iron but to let fumes go the other way.......out the window...
using a small paint brush coat the area to be desoldered...heat pin with
iron desuck with pump....each pin.... if you don't get it the first time
don't worry....move on to another pin as not to heat the ic in the same
place for more than 10 seconds.......when all pins look pretty empty take
small needle nose pliers and wiggle the pin from the solder side till
loose.....remove ic....my sucess rate is very high ..maybe 1 outta 10 was
damaged.<G>
when you start talking that it may take a couple hours to remove ic's...vers
you having to work a weeks pay to buy the ic's i find it no at all that bad
a decision...tim
{Original Message removed}

1999\12\30@161824 by Nigel Goodwin

flavicon
picon face
In message <Pine.BSI.4.05L.9912301430330.20988-100000spamKILLspammoose.erie.net>,> Ian Smith <.....iansmithKILLspamspam.....NCINTER.NET> writes
>I have a number of useful chips on junk boards that I want
>to use with some PIC Microcontrollers by Microchip, but am not
>experienced on desoldering.  I know many boards are made with
>lead solder, so I work in well ventilated areas.

I've just been used as a 'guinea pig' by the Health and Safety
Inspectors, to measure the dangers from soldering in a service
environment and to evaluate whether fume extraction equipment is
required. During this I asked what the potential dangers from soldering
were?, they were totally unconcerned about the lead content in the
solder, they were only concerned about the flux fumes given off. In any
case, I had to wear an electric pump and filter, which captures the
fumes in about the same proportion as I would be breathing in during
soldering, and the filter contents are taken away to be analysed.

BTW, the flux fumes apparently can cause asthma?.

>Anyone know an easier way than prying ICs off while heating
>the pins and still having a working chip at the end of it all?
>Any solvents that eat solder? Maybe solvents that eat the
>circuit board away? Some sort of oven arrangement? Magic?

If it's single sided board, just use a de-solder pump or de-solder
braid, but if it's through-hole plated it's rather more difficult. I do
have a 16pin DIL bit for my soldering iron, that works well, just heat
all the pins at once and pull the chip out - but they are quite
expensive, and you need various sizes. Nowadays I use a couple of
different electric de-solder pumps at work, one is part of our Pace SMT
re-work station, and the other is a handheld de-soldering gun, it has a
hollow bit and an electric pump in the handle, it sucks all the solder
straight out of the plated through holes. Neither of these are cheap
though, an alternative suggestion is to use a blowtorch to heat all the
joints and either pull the chip out, or if you are lucky it might fall
out :-).

--

Nigel.

       /--------------------------------------------------------------\
       | Nigel Goodwin   | Internet : EraseMEnigelgspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTlpilsley.demon.co.uk     |
       | Lower Pilsley   | Web Page : http://www.lpilsley.demon.co.uk |
       | Chesterfield    | Official site for Shin Ki and New Spirit   |
       | England         |                 Ju Jitsu                   |
       \--------------------------------------------------------------/

1999\12\30@162045 by Reginald Neale

flavicon
face
<x-flowed>>I have a number of useful chips on junk boards that I want
>to use with some PIC Microcontrollers by Microchip, but am not
>experienced on desoldering.  I know many boards are made with
>lead solder, so I work in well ventilated areas.
>
>Anyone know an easier way than prying ICs off while heating
>the pins and still having a working chip at the end of it all?
>Any solvents that eat solder? Maybe solvents that eat the
>circuit board away? Some sort of oven arrangement? Magic?
>
>On a related note.. anyone have tips on how to get the silicon
>wafers out of dead ICs?  I have used tools to chip and scrape
>away the black whatever and have about a dozen successes.  Yeah,
>it took a long time, I destroyed a lot of (already dead) chips
>and being slightly obsessive compulsive really helps after a
>few hours of picking away at the case with a needle.  :-)
>Perhaps something the (surprise!) eats away the case?
>

  Ian:

  Anything that eats away the epoxy is very nasty stuff.
  Much more dangerous to your health than solder.

  One thing that works occasionally is to put the chip in
  a vise. Try both endwise and lengthwise. Just keep on
  increasing the pressure. Eventually, it breaks; often
  along the discontinuity between epoxy and silicon.

  Of course you'll ruin a lot of chips, but since they're
  dead anyway, what's the difference? The few that do break
  just right are pretty interesting.

  Good luck,
  Reg Neale

</x-flowed>

1999\12\30@162949 by Henk Tobbe

flavicon
face
> I have a number of useful chips on junk boards that I want
> to use with some PIC Microcontrollers by Microchip, but am not
> experienced on desoldering.

For years and years I have been using a paint-stripper heater (electric
one). Heat up the soldering side long enough and hold the board with the
component side down. Have something to tap it against regularly and 90 % of
the components fall out by themselves and the rest can be pried loose with
plyers. The recycling rate is about 70 %. I am talking about "classic"
components. SMD is a different thing.
Some of the parts have to be cleaned from solder spattered on it. This is
usually fairly easy. Most components survive the desoldering process and as
a result I have for too much junk in my junk box.
I use the components for experimenting. Once I have completed an experiment
the lasting result is usually made of new components.

Stay outdoors and upwind. The fumes that accompany this method are VERY
dangerous.
Henk - VK2GWK
http://www.users.bigpond.com/tobbe/

1999\12\30@164827 by paulb

flavicon
face
Nigel Goodwin wrote:

> BTW, the flux fumes apparently can cause asthma?.

 Yeah.  Don't I know it, twenty years later?!
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\12\30@175102 by andy howard

flavicon
face
----- Original Message -----

{Quote hidden}

Maybe this is a good point to say you shouldn't try to open devices that
handle large amounts of power, especially not RF power devices.  These
very often contain beryllium compounds which are not only toxic but are
also powerful carcinogens.
Breaking into the various ceramics and powders used in some components
is very likely to give off a fine, breathable dust which will do you no
good at all...
Beryllium copper is usually OK AFAIK (maybe not if you attack it with
your handy power grinder though).

My personal rule-of-thumb is not to mess with anything having a
heatsink, mounting stud or ceramic package.


On the subject of desoldering, the DIL-shaped tips available for some
irons work well.
Applying flux helps, encourages the solder to flow with any method.
Blowtorches tend to run a bit too hot IME, leaving a sticky,
burnt-solder clag and charring board or resist -  but I've had good
results with a heatshrinking-type hot air gun set to low-heat and
tapping the board on the bench. Only for disposable boards though, don't
expect it to go back together afterwards.

I'd second the suggestion about being aware where the hot air (and
solder) gets directed and deflected. Sudden Involuntary Depilation
Syndrome can cause you to drop the board.




main
       call    Seasonal_Y2K_Greeting



Andy.

1999\12\30@192329 by victor faria

flavicon
face
try heating up the solder and if you have compressed air blow .
wear safety glasses.works good
vf
-----Original Message-----
From: Nigel Goodwin <nigelgspamspam_OUTLPILSLEY.DEMON.CO.UK>
To: @spam@PICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU <KILLspamPICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Thursday, December 30, 1999 4:18 PM
Subject: Re: [OT] How to desolder old components?


{Quote hidden}

1999\12\30@224253 by Mark Willis

flavicon
face
Dave VanHorn wrote:
> > Soldering braid works, but can be useless on multi-layer boards with
> > ground/power planes that sink the heat from the legs you are desoldering.
> > Same with "solder suckers". The torch always works, subject to the
> mentioned
> > limitations.
>
> Those "soldapults" I've always found useless, but I know others who can use
> them to remove and replace anything with thruhole leads and the work looks
> great. I guess I just don't have the knack..
>
> I have a pace micro portable desoldering station, and with that, I can get
> anything out.
>
> The torch method works, just use a thin screwdriver or maybe 0.020 shim
> stock to gently lift the chip out.

I use a PanaVise and one of the smaller "spring-loaded" solder suckers,
(Like the Weidmuller unit, PAL1700-ND, on page 508 of the current
Digi-Key catalog, at center bottom - Radio Shack sells one that's OK for
this), and have pretty good luck - you want / need both hands free, heat
the pin then "instantly" swap the de-soldering unit in place - better
yet, heat the pin on the top of the PC board, with the de-soldering tool
on the bottom, works even better.  (Use a light behind the PC board so
you can see where the de-solderer is.)  I use that unit quite often.

I don't think much of the "squeeze bulb" type de-solderers, used those,
they don't have the "oomph".  And for most PCB work the huge
spring-loaded units are just too unwieldy.

De-soldering braid works well also, as it's *copper braid* beware that
you don't brand yourself with the hot braid, though.  That smarts <G>
Use a coarser tip for those poorly designed boards that won't let you
heat up the pin (like a 1/8" tip.)  I find the 0.01" tip I got thinking
I'd use it for fine SMD work, just sits unused most of the time - I use
a 0.03" or 0.05" more often, screwdriver type tip.

Use what works for you, those parts are FREE, don't be afraid to play
around & see what your equipment does best - The more experience you
have with what doesn't work on "free" parts, the less likely you are to
make those mistakes on non-free parts.  And the better solderer you'll
get to be, to where you can solder SMD stuff with a heated fire poker,
on the hearth by firelight <G>  (Well, maybe not quite!)

I'm looking forwards to spending $1250 or so some day for a full Metcal
Talon station, but that's probably outside most folks' budget.  Those
"Pro" stations that use shop air to provide continuous suction are neat,
but, the cheapest you see them for is usually several hundred dollars.

I've seen "tongs" (two heated blades) that run off their own heater
element, for $40ish, has anyone tried those?  Luck, Don't Bother, Mixed
results?  I've wondered, for pulling 40-pin DIPs they'd be handy.

And for those who get stuck removing a "ShrinkDIP" package - been there,
done that, flush cutters work really well, just cut all the pins off the
IC and then desolder the pins one at a time <G>  (Zigzag pin pattern,
really hard to do unless you used a torch.  I'll have to try that, these
were boards for rework and no hot air unit.)

Oh.  BGA (Ball Grid Array) packages;  I think "Don't Try" is a good
starting point, "Think Again", at least <G>

 Mark

--
I re-ship for small US & overseas businesses, world-wide.
(For private individuals at cost; ask.)

1999\12\31@010121 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
What is the usual technique with the braid? I have some of it but have
never had great luck, even on single sided boards. In my case, once a tiny
bit of solder wicks onto the braid, no more seems to transfer. I end up
having to snip off bits of braid several times for a single DIP pin! I have
tried heating the component lead and then applying the braid, and I think I
have also tried heating the braid. Any ideas?

Sean

At 02:36 PM 12/30/99 EST, you wrote:
>You can get desoldering braid at Radio Shack.  It is cheap and works pretty
>well.
>
>Max
>
|
| Sean Breheny
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM
| Electrical Engineering Student
\--------------=----------------
Save lives, please look at http://www.all.org
Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
RemoveMEshb7spamTakeThisOuTcornell.edu ICQ #: 3329174
__________________________________________
NetZero - Defenders of the Free World
Get your FREE Internet Access and Email at
http://www.netzero.net/download/index.html

1999\12\31@011829 by p.cousens

flavicon
face
I bought a solering iron combined with solder sucker three
years ago when I had a laundry folder controller to repair.

A bad 7815 had supplied 27 volts to all the 74XX series IC's.
I removed 130 dead 14/16 DIL chips (without cutting the pins)
in about 3 hours from double sided PTH boards with only 3 or
4 damages to the tracks.

I always use a screwdriver to break the remaining solder by
pushing the pin sidways (screwdriver against the flat of the pin),
on the bottom of the board (and top if its PTH)

Other times when I do cut the pins of first it is great to
clear the hole, normally removing the pin remains with the
solder first time.

The iron cost me around $30 and has a round, flat ended hollow tip
(like the white teflon end of a solder sucker)
The solder is sucked up through the tip and shaft by a conventional
spring type solder sucker that clips into the handle.
--
Peter Cousens
email: p.cousensEraseMEspam.....cwcom.net  or  EraseMEp.cousensspamvirgin.net
smail: 48, Yarmouth Cresent, London, N179PQ, England.

1999\12\31@031347 by Mark Willis

flavicon
face
I get it to "curl" (so I can use it without it soldering itself to other
pins), and hold the soldering iron tip firmly onto the back side of the
braid, "forcing" and holding it against the solder that I want rid of,
until that solder melts & flows fully.

Then, having bent the braid while doing that spot, move to the next
pin.  I am guessing that you don't have a large enough soldering iron
tip, or hot enough of an iron temperature, and those might be why you're
having problems getting enough heat transfer here?  (You want a larger
tip, say 0.5" to 0.7", as you're "soldering" a lots heavier "pin" than a
0.1" DIL pin - the braid plus the pin you're trying to wick, takes up
lots more heat.  That 0.01" ultra fine tip, will tend to just melt
enough solder to stick itself to the board as heat transfer increases
<G>)

I usually use 1"-1.5" of braid for about 8-10 pins, at a guess?  I've
done a LOT of rework, enough that I'm surprised I ever can look a PCB in
the face <G>

Another possibility is that you could be using too fine of braid.  Hard
to say without more info, but I don't think that is it from your post
<G>

Hard to describe what I do, too, the idea's to only de-solder one pin at
a time by curving the wick - if you don't do this, it tends to solder
itself to other pins at the same time, and get stuck.  That's a pain, so
I bend the wick.

 Mark

Sean Breheny wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
I re-ship for small US & overseas businesses, world-wide.
(For private individuals at cost; ask.)

1999\12\31@072915 by andy howard

flavicon
face
----- Original Message -----
From: "Sean Breheny" <RemoveMEshb7spam_OUTspamKILLspamCORNELL.EDU>




> What is the usual technique with the braid? I have some of it but have
> never had great luck, even on single sided boards. In my case, once a
tiny
> bit of solder wicks onto the braid, no more seems to transfer.

Sounds like you may not be heating the braid.

Technique is:

1).Lay braid across solder to be removed, about a quarter to half an
inch from the end of the braid works for me.

2).Place iron on braid and wait for the solder to wick up.

3).Drop braid and curse at charred fingers...


As others have said, results can be variable on multi-layer boards.

1999\12\31@083857 by wwl

picon face
On Fri, 31 Dec 1999 12:15:09 -0000, you wrote:

>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Sean Breheny" <RemoveMEshb7TakeThisOuTspamspamCORNELL.EDU>
>
>
>
>
>> What is the usual technique with the braid? I have some of it but have
>> never had great luck, even on single sided boards. In my case, once a
>tiny
>> bit of solder wicks onto the braid, no more seems to transfer.
>
>Sounds like you may not be heating the braid.
>
There is a huge difference between brands of braid. The only stuff
I've found that's really good is Soder-Wick from Chamtronics, which is
amazing - it can clean a pad so it looks like nothing's ever been
soldered to it. You also need a fairly powerful (powerful, not hot)
iron) to stop the wick cooling the joint.


'[OT] How to desolder old components?'
2000\01\01@111917 by J Nagy
flavicon
face
Sean Breheny wrote:
>
>What is the usual technique with the braid? I have some of it but have
>never had great luck, even on single sided boards. In my case, once a tiny
>bit of solder wicks onto the braid, no more seems to transfer. I end up
>having to snip off bits of braid several times for a single DIP pin! I have
>tried heating the component lead and then applying the braid, and I think I
>have also tried heating the braid. Any ideas?
>
>Sean
>
>At 02:36 PM 12/30/99 EST, you wrote:
>>You can get desoldering braid at Radio Shack.  It is cheap and works pretty
>>well.
>>


Sean:
       Sounds to me like you may have old stock (or just *very* poor
quality). If the braid is good it will wick a fair distance in, and
continue to pick up 'loose' solder without much effort. Some of my 10~15 yr
old stuff acts like you describe.
       The technique I've always used is to cover the joint with the
braid, then heat it through the braid. Need a fairly hefty iron if you're
to do a lot (better to get in and out quickly so you don't damage traces).
I've often used my 150W gun before,but usually use the iron (~27 or 35W).



       Jim

 Elm Electronics
 ICs for Experimenters
http://www.elmelectronics.com/

2000\01\01@121008 by Dan Creagan

flavicon
face
Dip the braid in flux if you have old braid. You only have to use a very
little bit of flux - I just dab my fingers in the flux and then run them up
and down the braid to wipe them off.  The braid just has a 'patina' that is
preventing solder flow .. the flux will fix it.

For stripping large numbers of components, I use the 'propane torch and
screwdriver' method.  Really messy and fumes get everywhere.  Survival rate
of components is < 50%.  But it is quick.

Dan

{Original Message removed}

2000\01\01@204307 by Hamish Moffatt

flavicon
face
On Fri, Dec 31, 1999 at 12:12:04AM -0800, Mark Willis wrote:
> I get it to "curl" (so I can use it without it soldering itself to other
> pins), and hold the soldering iron tip firmly onto the back side of the
> braid, "forcing" and holding it against the solder that I want rid of,
> until that solder melts & flows fully.

I usually find myself holding the braid in position and burning my fingers
while I desolder. Ouch.


Hamish
--
Hamish Moffatt       Mobile: +61 412 011 176     EraseMEhamishspamspamspamBeGonerising.com.au
Rising Software Australia Pty. Ltd.    http://www.risingsoftware.com/
Phone: +61 3 9894 4788    Fax: +61 3 9894 3362    USA: 1 888 667 7839

2000\01\02@082357 by victor faria

flavicon
face
in the past what i've done is heat up the solder with a iron and when melted
i would have a tank full of compressed air with a blow gun or on and off
valve and quicklly blow the hot solder away from the contacts it worked
great.
war safety glasses but it is very quick.
good luck
victor
{Original Message removed}

2000\01\02@214019 by paulb

flavicon
face
victor faria wrote:

> in the past what i've done is heat up the solder with a iron and when
> melted i would have a tank full of compressed air with a blow gun or
> on and off valve and quicklly blow the hot solder away from the
> contacts it worked great.
> war safety glasses but it is very quick.
> good luck

 Sure are some characters on this list.  How many have white spotted
arms, legs faces (etc...)?
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

2000\01\03@042917 by Pavel Korensky

flavicon
face
At 01:01 31.12.1999 -0500, you wrote:
>What is the usual technique with the braid? I have some of it but have
>never had great luck, even on single sided boards. In my case, once a tiny
>bit of solder wicks onto the braid, no more seems to transfer. I end up
>having to snip off bits of braid several times for a single DIP pin! I have
>tried heating the component lead and then applying the braid, and I think I
>have also tried heating the braid. Any ideas?

Just heat the pins through the braid. Put some flux on the braid, put the
braid on pins and soldering gun to the braid. Works like a charm. I did a
LOT of SMDs this way...

Happy New Year

PavelK

**************************************************************************
* Pavel KorenskyÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊ *
* DATOR3 LAN Services spol. s r.o.ÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊ *
* Styblova 13, 140 00, Prague 4, Czech Republic      ÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊ *
*ÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊ *
* PGP Key fingerprint:Ê F3 E1 AE BC 34 18 CB A6Ê CC D0 DA 9E 79 03 41 D4 *
*ÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊ *
* SUMMA SCIENTIA - NIHIL SCIREÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊ *
**************************************************************************

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2000 , 2001 only
- Today
- New search...