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'[OT] How should I teach electronics (to a seven-ye'
2008\11\26@155348 by Normand Fisher

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I've seen many recommendations on how to teach electronics in this
forum but they were all geared towards more mature students.

My 7-year old grand-daughter wants to learn electronics.  The last
thing I want to do is to discourage her by using the wrong approach.
I'm not convinced that some kits labeled as suitable for a seven year
old are necessarily good for learning.  They may be more about
playing.

If anyone here has some pointers (courses, kits, advice, etc...) I
would sincerely appreciate it.

Normand

2008\11\26@162616 by Steve Smith

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Crystal set.... that's the first thing I ever built... Coil capacitor and an
OA81 and a crystal earpiece....

Shortwave for a year tilt I learnt about valves....

Steve


{Original Message removed}

2008\11\26@163248 by Michael Algernon

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Go with your strengths.  What do you already know about electronics ?  
Teach that stuff.
What does she think is cool about electronics ?   I would look at  
software that allows virtual circuits.
flashing lights, audio effects, video stuff is always fun.   There are  
software packages that allow one to create cool effects.  Then you can  
explain how those things work.  Robots are cool too.   They  
demonstrate motors , sensors , control algorithms , etc.
There are interesting video demonstrations on the internet.
Get her a good laptop.  I prefer MacIntosh.

MA
{Quote hidden}

> --

2008\11\26@164412 by Forrest W. Christian

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www.elenco.com/snapcircuits.html

There is a manual for the first 100 projects at
http://manuals.elenco.com/manuals/sc-100%201-101.pdf

Normand Fisher wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\11\26@165836 by PAUL James

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One computer program you could use is Virtual Breadboard.  You can get
it at virtualbreadboard.com.
Cost is about $40.00 USD if I remember correctly.   Tell James I sent
you and that I said hello.


       
Regards,

       
Jim


{Original Message removed}

2008\11\26@185836 by Xiaofan Chen

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On Thu, Nov 27, 2008 at 4:52 AM, Normand Fisher <spam_OUTicietlaTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
> I've seen many recommendations on how to teach electronics in this
> forum but they were all geared towards more mature students.
>
> My 7-year old grand-daughter wants to learn electronics.  The last
> thing I want to do is to discourage her by using the wrong approach.
> I'm not convinced that some kits labeled as suitable for a seven year
> old are necessarily good for learning.  They may be more about
> playing.
>

Last time it was popular to use AM radio kits (discrete components)
as the learning tool. Simple kits with lights (LEDs) and sound are good
for children.

On the other hand, it might be more fun to teach her programming
on the PC. No need to meddle with soldering.

Xiaofan

2008\11\26@190252 by Sean Breheny

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An advanced child (even a precocious 10 year old, say) could get a lot
of out Switcher Cad/LTSpice, available free from Linear Tech.

Sean


On Wed, Nov 26, 2008 at 4:57 PM, PAUL James <.....James.PaulKILLspamspam@spam@colibrys.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2008\11\26@190540 by Sean Breheny

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Alexandre makes an interesting point but I'm not sure what the answer is.

One of the reasons why electronics was cool to me as a kid was that I
understood things which most people didn't, and I could do things that
most people couldn't. The Internet eventually caused me to lose
interest in "chatting" via amateur radio, but it didn't cause me to
lose interest in long-distance HF communications or satellites or data
comms over difficult radio conditions, etc. There is something amazing
about doing it all *yourself* rather than just plugging into a
ready-made network.

Sean


On Wed, Nov 26, 2008 at 4:47 PM, Alexandre Guimarães
<listasspamKILLspamlogikos.com.br> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2008\11\26@205611 by William \Chops\ Westfield

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On Nov 26, 2008, at 12:52 PM, Normand Fisher wrote:

> I'm not convinced that some kits labeled as suitable for a seven  
> year old are necessarily good for learning.  They may be more about  
> playing.

IMO that's OK.  You start off "playing", gain familiarity with the  
components, the tools, how things get connected, what it's possible to  
do, etc.  That's fine for a 7 year old, and a good basis for  
additional learning.  Recall that at that age, the idea that  
electricity flows through wires, and the positive and negative  
terminals of the battery shouldn't be connected to each other are  
pretty significant accomplishments.
AND/OR gates made of switches are "advanced", but not as interesting  
as the "toy" circuits...

BillW

2008\11\27@023504 by Ruben Jönsson

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Ask her why she wants to learn electronics and what she think she is going to
be able to do with that knowledge. I think the perspective of "learning
electronics" is far different between a 7 year old and a grown up (with lots of
school years behind him/her). Then take it from there.

Maby you need to learn some general facts about the physics of electricity
first. But it needs to be kept simple and fun. That can be done by using lamps,
switches, motors, relays and other things that don't need to be polarized and
uses all available voltage and current (no resistors for voltage dividing or
current limiting).

When I was a kid I enjoyed a mechano like play set called something like "The
little electrician". I think it is still avalable today and I learned a lot
from it. But the important thing here is that there is someone that knows about
this stuff that can guide her and explain to her what is going on and why.

Then when it comes to electronics it is perhaps best to start with the digital
parts instead of the analog. The analog stuff mostly needs you to know some
math while digital is just 1 and 0 and combinations of that. Perhaps you can
find something like a PLC to toy with, combining inputs and outputs with logic
expressions and get those lamps and motors running.

/Ruben


{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\11\27@041523 by Forrest W. Christian

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Ok, let me reply again from a personal perspective... instead of just
pointing towards the snap circuits.

Having *been* a 7 year old very interested in electronics...  let me
talk about things I did which I remember, and that were very much part
of my early learning.   Since it's been quite a few years since I was
seven, this will probably be very much out of order.

First of all, let me mention that my Mom has pictures of me playing with
extension cords and the rest of the electrical box when I was 2.   Yes,
two.   I guess I knew enough not to go near the wall outlets.  Actually
that's another story for another time, but let's just say that the
incident made me afraid of the wall outlets and vacuum cleaner at the
same time.  That said, I still remember playing with the cords, and
remember that I learned certain things from that experience - such as
that fuses will go in light sockets and so on.    Mainly this was of
course just mechanical learning... but it gives you an idea.

I also remember that some of my first "electronic" sets were simply one
or more light bulbs, some homemade switches, and the like.     I
remember that I had a chunk of multiconductor wire that I was given from
the local phone company I used to hook everything up.  I remember having
a 6V lantern battery w/screw terminals, and a doorbell buzzer or bell
(don't remember which)- the old fashioned type which was basically a
solenoid and a NC contact, and a whole bunch of light bulbs - all 6v of
course (although the bell was probably 12, but worked kindof on 6).  I
also remembering having a real knife switch and a doorbell button as
well but I didn't use them all that much - see below.   I also had a
couple foot section of what had to be 200 conductor cable, 22GA or so,
that I pulled strands out of to hook things up.

At that time I also learned that brads and paperclips make awesome low
voltage switches.  Put a brad through the "two loop" end of the paperclp
and then through a piece of cardboad (actually a piece of a cereal box
was my preferred tool).  Then put a second brad through the cardboard
such that the other end of the paperclip can loop around it.   The brads
turn out to be the poles of the switch.  If you do it right, you can
hook the paperclip around the second brad to turn it on, and so forth.  
You can also make a multipole switch using multiple brads on the second
side.

Likewise, you can make a light bulb holder using tinfoil and cardboard
(put the tinfoil on the top, then push the lamp through the cardboard
such that the foil stays attached to the outside metal part.  Then put a
second piece below (sometimes using tape to prevent a short), to make
contact with the tip of the lightbulb).   You can also use a couple of
paperclips.

With the 6V lantern battery, a short isn't going to do very much and is
relatively safe.  

One year my parents bought me one of these:  
http://www.flickr.com/photos/87378786@N00/285081870/ .  I remember doing
a lot of the projects, but more fun was "circuit bending" to take a
circuit and then start yanking wires out (or adding) and see what
happened.   I guess I should admit at this point that I'm not sure how
much I actually *learned*, although there were quite a few things I
tried and learned - such as the drectivity of the AM loop antenna, and
some other items as well.

The one thing I would say that helped the most as I got older is that my
parents seemed very willing to put any reasonable amount into my
interest.   We didn't have an elecronics store in our town, so when we
went to a town which did have one (a radio shack), they would often
leave me there for an hour or so while they did less interesting
shopping..   By the time they came back I would have amassed an
interesting collection of stuff on the counter, and although I rememebr
at least one cringe from my Father, I don't remember ever being told
no....   Don't get me wrong, it was usually things like a voltmeter, and
then random components to do something with.   I think they figured it
was more productive than buying me the latest toy.

I also amassed quite the junk box.  I was pretty good at having
something I could extract a component from (I was soldering at quite the
early age).  I remember several car radios, an old TV set, and several
other items...  all of which were attemted to be fixed, before I started
using the components.

I think what I might be trying to say is that perhaps the best thing to
do is to point the kid in the direction of interest and then try to be
as supportive as you can.  And encourage creativity.   I remember making
buzzers out of thin tin can strips and homemade electromagnets....  Wrap
a wire around a nail, hook one end of the wire to the batttery, and
then  rig the coil such that it pulls the can away.   The other thing,
is that I learned everything pretty much on my own - my parents made
sure I had some books on the subject which were at my skill level, but
in all, I wasn't really *taught* electronics as much as I was given the
opportunity to learn electronics, and provided enough resources that I
could experiment and learn.   To this day, I still enjoy pushing the
boundaries and "inventing" something new - this process has continued
since I was figuring out how electrical cords plugged together at two,
through all of the experimenting I did growing up, to the present day.

-forrest

2008\11\27@050343 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Having *been* a 7 year old very interested in electronics...
>let me talk about things I did which I remember, and that
>were very much part of my early learning.   Since it's been
>quite a few years since I was seven, this will probably be
>very much out of order.

Forrests description of 'being a kid' is probably as good a pointer as any
to how to get a kid interested.

I would suggest starting a youngster with some non-electronic projects, like
a tin can telephone.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tin_can_telephone
http://www.dsokids.com/2001/dso.asp?PageID=100

>From there, they can see how electronics can be used to make things better,
rather than just building something electronic, with no particular aim or
purpose.

2008\11\27@153847 by John Ferrell

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The Jameco LED Christmas Tree kit made a big hit several years back and it
still seems to show up every Christmas...
Learning to solder is fun for a little one!

John Ferrell    W8CCW

"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing." -- Edmund Burke
http://DixieNC.US

{Original Message removed}

2008\11\27@161156 by Clint Sharp

picon face
In message
<.....bec31ba40811261252i6ffb7019h59b4cea1be1a1599KILLspamspam.....mail.gmail.com>, Normand
Fisher <EraseMEicietlaspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> writes
>My 7-year old grand-daughter wants to learn electronics.  The last
>thing I want to do is to discourage her by using the wrong approach.
>I'm not convinced that some kits labeled as suitable for a seven year
>old are necessarily good for learning.  They may be more about
>playing.
Don't rule out playing as a way of learning, if you can make electronics
fun then she'll learn without realising and value the time you spend
with her even more. I learned basic electronics at my grandfather's knee
and still treasure the memories 30+ years later. M y daughter is already
interested in the breadboard and making basic circuits, flashing lights
etc. with my guidance, she's only four and a half years old. She doesn't
realise it yet but she's learning.
>
>If anyone here has some pointers (courses, kits, advice, etc...) I
>would sincerely appreciate it.
>
>Normand

--
Clint Sharp

2008\11\27@165615 by Robert Rolf

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John Ferrell wrote:

> The Jameco LED Christmas Tree kit made a big hit several years back and it
> still seems to show up every Christmas...
> Learning to solder is fun for a little one!

Just a LOT harder to do now with lead free solders.

2008\11\27@222703 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Nov 27, 2008, at 1:55 PM, Robert Rolf wrote:

>> Learning to solder is fun for a little one!
>
> Just a LOT harder to do now with lead free solders.

I don't plan to use lead-free solder at home for a very long time.

BillW

2008\11\28@010548 by Peter Loron

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Hmmm...I guess I just haven't found it hard to use at all, and I'm no  
wizard.

-Pete

On Nov 27, 2008, at 1:55 PM, Robert Rolf wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> --

2008\11\28@011133 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
I think maybe he was concerned about putting leaded solder in the
hands of a small child. I don't know enough about how easy it is to
absorb. I think it is not really a problem for an adult but it can be
very bad for a child whose brain is still developing.

Sean


On Thu, Nov 27, 2008 at 10:26 PM, William Chops Westfield
<westfwspamspam_OUTmac.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\11\28@021835 by William \Chops\ Westfield

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On Nov 27, 2008, at 10:11 PM, Sean Breheny wrote:

> I think maybe he was concerned about putting leaded solder in the
> hands of a small child. I don't know enough about how easy it is to
> absorb. I think it is not really a problem for an adult but it can be
> very bad for a child whose brain is still developing.

Yeah; a lot of people who did it in the last generation ended up  
becoming engineers!

Children should learn to wash their hands after handling potentially  
dangerous materials.  I'm pretty sure that's MORE than sufficient to  
deal with the dangers of solder.  (There are people who claim that the  
lead scare in paints and such was much overblown.  After all, people  
were proposing that kids were eating lead paint to cause problems, at  
a time when every automobile was spewing burnt lead products into the  
air.)

BillW

2008\11\28@025447 by Pablo Ginhson

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With 5 years old, I started to break down all the radios and a lot of my RC cars trying to see how they work. Today I´m trying to see how a PIC works with my 36 years old.
I think that every kind that wanted to know something, we must help with that. A month ago my kid (5 years old) made me a question, "how this walkie-talkie works, how transmit my voice throug the anttennas?", I couldn´t explain anithing about electromagnetics, but with somethig similar he understood me.
Try with a hose and littles balls to explain about a current and voltage. Then, make a little electromagnetic with a wire around a metal and so on.

Pablo Ginhson> From: @spam@westfwKILLspamspammac.com> To: KILLspampiclistKILLspamspammit.edu> Subject: Re: [OT] How should I teach electronics (to a seven-year old)?> Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2008 23:18:12 -0800> > > On Nov 27, 2008, at 10:11 PM, Sean Breheny wrote:> > > I think maybe he was concerned about putting leaded solder in the> > hands of a small child. I don't know enough about how easy it is to> > absorb. I think it is not really a problem for an adult but it can be> > very bad for a child whose brain is still developing.> > Yeah; a lot of people who did it in the last generation ended up > becoming engineers!> > Children should learn to wash their hands after handling potentially > dangerous materials. I'm pretty sure that's MORE than sufficient to > deal with the dangers of solder. (There are people who claim that the > lead scare in paints and such was much overblown. After all, people > were proposing that kids were eating lead paint to cause problems, at > a time when every automobile was spewing burnt lead products into the > air.)> > BillW> >

2008\11\28@042426 by apptech

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> Children should learn to wash their hands after handling potentially
> dangerous materials.

Definitely.

> I'm pretty sure that's MORE than sufficient to
> deal with the dangers of solder.

Probably

> (There are people who claim that the
> lead scare in paints and such was much overblown.

Probably not.

There were definitely cases of lead poisoning from toys, cribs etc.
And every now and then there is a new one from very old equipment that
people dig up from storage and reuse or refurbish.

Sanding down houses painted with lead based paint can be a life threatening
activity. I know (one person away from direct contact) of someone who had
their health and life utterly destroyed from doing that.

It doesn't vapouise overly well. A soldering iron is probably not going to
raise its vapour pressure a vast amount. BUT I'm told that people who taget
shoot regularly are at risk of lead poisoning if they don't wear suitable
breathing protection.



  Russell

2008\11\28@043910 by Neil Cherry

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William "Chops" Westfield wrote:
> On Nov 27, 2008, at 10:11 PM, Sean Breheny wrote:
>
>> I think maybe he was concerned about putting leaded solder in the
>> hands of a small child. I don't know enough about how easy it is to
>> absorb. I think it is not really a problem for an adult but it can be
>> very bad for a child whose brain is still developing.
>
> Yeah; a lot of people who did it in the last generation ended up  
> becoming engineers!
>
> Children should learn to wash their hands after handling potentially  
> dangerous materials.  I'm pretty sure that's MORE than sufficient to  
> deal with the dangers of solder.  (There are people who claim that the  
> lead scare in paints and such was much overblown.  After all, people  
> were proposing that kids were eating lead paint to cause problems, at  
> a time when every automobile was spewing burnt lead products into the  
> air.)

I remember growing up in NYC, our apartment had lead paint (you
could see the lead in the side view of the paint chips). We
used to handle the chips all the time (but I never ate them).
I do recall biting down on lead weights on our fishing lines.
I have no idea if I'm damaged because of the lead.

--
Linux Home Automation         Neil Cherry       RemoveMEncherryTakeThisOuTspamlinuxha.com
http://www.linuxha.com/                         Main site
http://linuxha.blogspot.com/                    My HA Blog
Author of:            Linux Smart Homes For Dummies

2008\11\28@054343 by Gerhard

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On Fri, 28 Nov 2008 01:11:15 -0500, "Sean Breheny"  wrote:

>I think maybe he was concerned about putting leaded solder in the
>hands of a small child. I don't know enough about how easy it is to
>absorb. I think it is not really a problem for an adult but it can be
>very bad for a child whose brain is still developing.

I think a child old enough to be handed over a soldering iron should
be old enough to handle solder... while lead is dangerous, there are
other dangers around :)

Gerhard

2008\11\28@055145 by Tony Smith

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> > I think maybe he was concerned about putting leaded solder in the
> > hands of a small child. I don't know enough about how easy it is to
> > absorb. I think it is not really a problem for an adult but it can be
> > very bad for a child whose brain is still developing.
>
> Yeah; a lot of people who did it in the last generation ended up
> becoming engineers!
>
> Children should learn to wash their hands after handling potentially
> dangerous materials.  I'm pretty sure that's MORE than sufficient to
> deal with the dangers of solder.  (There are people who claim that the
> lead scare in paints and such was much overblown.  After all, people
> were proposing that kids were eating lead paint to cause problems, at
> a time when every automobile was spewing burnt lead products into the
> air.)
>
> BillW


It affects kids more than adults since they tend to smaller, chew on more
stuff, stick their hands in their mouth and aren't really keen on washing.
Lead needs to be ingested, handling solder then washing your hands solves
the problem.  Smokers have the problem where the lead transfers from hand to
cigarette to mouth, but if you smoke you've probably got other problems
anyway, that habit will kill you first.  Actually, lead poisoning tends not
to kill you but it isn't pleasant.  It doesn't help that you need a blood
test to detect poisoning, the symptoms are fairly vague.

When Australia switched to lead-free fuel it was thought that incidences of
lead poisoning would go down - they didn't.  A bit odd that.  Turns out it's
mainly from people renovating houses.  That paint you've been sanding down
goes everywhere, even a couple of kilometres away.  Gardens tend to have a
bit more lead than they should because of this.

Don't smoke, don't renovate, wash your hands.  Simple really.

Tony

2008\11\28@123235 by Peter Loron

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On Nov 28, 2008, at 1:23 AM, apptech wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Shooting outdoors, especially with jacketed bullets is pretty safe.  
Wash you hands afterwards, etc. The main issue is indoor ranges with  
poor ventilation where people shoot unjacketed bullets.

Also a problem if you cast your own bullets.

-Pete

2008\11\28@134649 by peter green

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> Just a LOT harder to do now with lead free solders.
>  
In my experiance the flux makes far more difference to the ease of
soldering than the metal composition provided you have a decent iron.
Lead free certainly requires more heat though which is a problem if you
are stuck with a 25W unregulated POS

BTW tin/lead/rosin solder is still readilly availible.

2008\11\29@002006 by Peter Todd

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On Fri, Nov 28, 2008 at 08:43:17AM -0200, Gerhard wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Admittedly, the first time I used a soldering iron, at around 7 or 8
years of age, I soon managed to leave it on it's own cord and created an
impressive shower of sparks as well as blowing a fuse. :)

Granted, all for the better, it was one of those big resistive bent wire
types, with plumbers solder, and my joints weren't working one bit!

- --
http://petertodd.org 'peter'[:-1]@petertodd.org
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2008\11\29@015109 by Justin Richards

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At the tender age of about nine I thought I knew a thing or two about
electricity and that Christmas the tree lights failed.

So fresh out of the pool, (Christmas is always hot here in Perth Aus it
seems) dripping wet I went to fix the lights.  You can see it coming ...

Popped the one out I thought had blown and read 14V of the side of the
globe.  Ah Ha I thought, 14 volts wont hurt, what if I shove something
metallic in the socket to bridge the tiny contacts and allowing electricity
to get to the other globes.  Kaaaa Bangggg.

Still not sure to this day which shock was greater:- the electrical shock or
the shock of discovering how wrong I was.

I learn t several lessons that day.  But it took me ages to figure out why I
got so badly booted.  (There are actually 2 plausible explaination)

Some who call themselves experts are unable to grasp why I got booted and
question that I got booted at all.

Incase you are curious it was about 18 x 14 volt little light globes
arranged in series and connected to a 240 volt outlet.  No step down
transformer etc.

On the same principle I have suggested at work (and was first laughed at)
that a question at interviews for new techs should be:-

There are 3 identical globes arranged in series connected to a fully charged
6 volt battery.  All globes are illuminated.  Now take out any one globe and
measure the voltage across the contacts in the globe holder with a voltmeter
what would the expected reading be.

We polled the existing techs and managers (very embarrassing) and about 1 in
5 said that you would see 6 volts.

Most answers came in at 2v, with some at 4 and 0v.  This is basic stuff but
somehow we move on to fixing boards etc and seem to forget the basics.

I had a horrible argument with an Electrical Engineer for a mining company
who refused to believe there would be virtually nill current flow and thus
no voltage drop across the remaining globes.  I just mentioned it to a party
group as we were discussing electric shocks.

I think I was perhaps a little too passionate due to my experience with
getting it so wrong with the Christmas Lights and looking back just how
dangerous my limited understanding was.

Alas my kids dont seem all that interested.  My all consuming interest in
electronics and electrics virtually went un-noticed when I was growing up.
My elder brother noticed and got me a 15 in 1 electronics kist for that
Christmas it turned out.  I so longed for a mentor.  Gee, if I had the
Piclist back then I would have been stoaked.  I am just happy to have it
now.

Justin



On Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 2:14 PM, Peter Todd <spamBeGonepetespamBeGonespampetertodd.org> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\11\29@030618 by Vasile Surducan

face picon face
Back in 1959 a very good russian writer has written a book about do it
yourself a radioreceiver with one and two transistors in 50 different
ways.
When I had 7 yers old I've build all those 50 schematics just because
it was a so good written book.

Now things has changed, you can even teach her electronics with a
serious solderless kit. Snapcircuit is nice, but not for a fan of
electronics which will be bored in less than 3 days. Nowadays some
kids have violet aura (being named indigo children). Such kids are
very difficult to be pleased with simple things. Read about those and
see if she belongs to those.

Teach her to solder as a first step. Explain her that satistfaction of
a self manufactured blinking LED or a singing bird have also pain
steps. Oce she will solder with pleasure, everything it's possible.

Vasile

On 11/26/08, Normand Fisher <TakeThisOuTicietlaEraseMEspamspam_OUTgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\11\29@132414 by Normand Fisher

picon face
WOW!
Thanks all for your many suggestions.  My grand-daughter is coming
this afternoon for her first
"lab".
Based on what I saw here, I'll be extra careful to see what makes
excited and then have her try some simple things.
Maybe she'll build the first robot to explore some alien world (like
my workshop!).

Normand

2008\11\30@141531 by andrew kelley

picon face
Solderless bread boards are nice for learning children.  Easy
connections, no hot iron, simple to change and see.

Just my .02 for having been there at 10.
andrew

On Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 1:23 PM, Normand Fisher <RemoveMEicietlaspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> wrote:
> WOW!
> Thanks all for your many suggestions.  My grand-daughter is coming
> this afternoon for her first
> "lab".
> Based on what I saw here, I'll be extra careful to see what makes
> excited and then have her try some simple things.
> Maybe she'll build the first robot to explore some alien world (like
> my workshop!).
>
> Normand
> -


'[OT] How should I teach electronics (to a seven-ye'
2008\12\03@111334 by Matthew Rhys-Roberts
flavicon
face
Am a bit late contributing to this thread, but anyway...

What my wife and I are discovering through reading and experience is
that children learn most of all through playing. So I reckon that
finding out what a youngster considers to be fun is vital.

Also worth considering: what were the teachers of your favourite
subjects like?

Matt

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