Searching \ for '[OT] How do PCB manufacturers produce their PCBs?' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/pcbs.htm?key=pcb
Search entire site for: 'How do PCB manufacturers produce their PCBs?'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT] How do PCB manufacturers produce their PCBs?'
2009\01\26@182742 by solarwind

picon face
So, how do PCB manufacturers produce their PCBs?

--
solarwind

2009\01\26@185542 by Dave Schmidt

flavicon
face
www.pwtpcbs.com/makingpcbs/index.html

Google has many many hits.

2009\01\26@185836 by peter green

flavicon
face
solarwind wrote:
> So, how do PCB manufacturers produce their PCBs?
>  
IIRC the PTH process our universities PCB facility uses is as follows, I
suspect the process at cheap end PCB vendors like olimex and barebones
PCB is pretty similar

Place the board on the drill machine and tell it to drill the holes.
Clean the PCB extremely throurohgly
Immerse the PCB in the PTH bath to plate the holes
Laminate the PCB with the photoresist layer
Expose the photoresist to UV through a mask made on a laser
photoplotter. The guy at uni does the alignment by hand, commercial
places probablly do it using some kind of automated system for better
accuracy.
Develop the photresist in the developer tank
Etch the PCB in the etch tank using FeCl (I think they use immersion
with air bubbles but i'm not sure)
Tin the PCB in the tinning bath

They do have the ability to do soldermask and milling after this but
they only tend to do that for big jobs, most prototypes don't get
soldermasked and get gilotined to roughly the right shape/size by the
mechanical workshop guys.

2009\01\26@185953 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
solarwind wrote:
> So, how do PCB manufacturers produce their PCBs?

Most PCB manufacturers are proud of what they do, so they publish it on
their website. AFAIK there are no professional PCB manufacturers on this
list, so why ask here?

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2009\01\26@190929 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
"Wouter van Ooijen" wrote:
> AFAIK there are no professional PCB manufacturers on this
> list,

Djula Djarmati? :)

Although I agree with your general sentiment: one should resist the urge to
submit one's question to a 2000-member-strong list the moment it enters
one's head, and use other resources available at one's disposal.

Vitaliy


2009\01\27@000525 by Peter

picon face
solarwind <x.solarwind.x <at> gmail.com> writes:
> So, how do PCB manufacturers produce their PCBs?

They have pixies with H1B visas working for them during the night time, and they
publish all that fancy information about how they don't do it to mislead the
competition and enchant the paying public.

Peter


2009\01\27@003952 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
"Peter" wrote:
>> So, how do PCB manufacturers produce their PCBs?
>
> They have pixies with H1B visas working for them during the night time,
> and they
> publish all that fancy information about how they don't do it to mislead
> the
> competition and enchant the paying public.

:)

So far, I've only had a chance to visit one board house (AC). I don't know
about other companies, but the amount of machinery they have is
mind-blowing. I was surprised to learn that multi-layer boards are basically
just glued together: to make a 4-layer board, they sandwich a double-sided
PCB between two other double-sided PCBs, press them together, and voila!

Vitaliy


2009\01\27@111350 by Peter

picon face
Vitaliy <spam <at> maksimov.org> writes:
> mind-blowing. I was surprised to learn that multi-layer boards are basically
> just glued together: to make a 4-layer board, they sandwich a double-sided
> PCB between two other double-sided PCBs, press them together, and voila!

I did everything from manual board making (single and small series, 1 and 2
sided) through 8-layer buried via board rework/repair (one place I worked at a
long time ago was just downwind of a large multilayer board maker - we knew when
they had a lot of work from the smell and from their guys not showing up for
lunch ...). I tend to be a little blase about technologies because a lot of the
low cost boards are made manually (literally so). Machines can be nice but one
must justify the costs, so cheap labor countries use few machines and vice
versa. I assume that you visited a US/S. California board house (and not one in
the boonies).

In any case, most non-smd large series boards (phenolic, low resolution) are
made in a totally different way from FR4 boards. Holes are punched, not drilled,
boards are punched out, not router cut, copper masking is printed on not
photoexposed, and so on.

Then again high end boards made of ptfe and alumina are done in a different way
again. So there is no easy way to answer the o.p.'s question.

Peter


2009\01\27@114130 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Jan 27, 2009, at 8:13 AM, Peter wrote:

> most non-smd large series boards (phenolic, low resolution) are
> made in a totally different way from FR4 boards. Holes are punched,  
> not drilled,
> boards are punched out, not router cut, copper masking is printed on  
> not
> photoexposed, and so on.

I believe there is also a significant set of boards made where the  
"resist" is actually the tin/lead plate, and the etchant is some  
ammonia based concoction.  (I'm not sure what RHoS has done to this  
process.)  Naturally, a plated resist makes for the possibility of  
very fine lines...

BillW

2009\01\27@121253 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

flavicon
face
William "Chops" Westfield escreveu:
> On Jan 27, 2009, at 8:13 AM, Peter wrote:
>
>  
>> most non-smd large series boards (phenolic, low resolution) are
>> made in a totally different way from FR4 boards. Holes are punched,  
>> not drilled,
>> boards are punched out, not router cut, copper masking is printed on  
>> not
>> photoexposed, and so on.
>>    
>
> I believe there is also a significant set of boards made where the  
> "resist" is actually the tin/lead plate, and the etchant is some  
> ammonia based concoction.  (I'm not sure what RHoS has done to this  
> process.)  Naturally, a plated resist makes for the possibility of  
> very fine lines...
>
> BillW
>  
As far as I know, all plated through hole boards use Sn/Pb as a mask for
etching (at least from a manufacturer I know).

First the board is drilled and electrolytic copper is deposited,
thickening the external foils and covering the internal surface of the
holes.

The photo-resist is applied to protect the copper where it will be later
etched (negative mask), then electro-chemical Sn/Pb is deposited over
the copper where the tracks will be and the internal surface of the holes.

The resist is removed and the board is etched. Then the Sn/Pb is removed
and the board is subjected to the rest of the process.


Regards,

Isaac
__________________________________________________
Faça ligações para outros computadores com o novo Yahoo! Messenger
http://br.beta.messenger.yahoo.com/

2009\01\27@125839 by Peter

picon face
Isaac Marino Bavaresco <isaacbavaresco <at> yahoo.com.br> writes:
> As far as I know, all plated through hole boards use Sn/Pb as a mask for
> etching (at least from a manufacturer I know).

There is also 'gold masking' and other exotic things. But most large scale
operations (consumer equipment etc) do not use photoresist, they use stencil
printing or offset (stamp) printing to put masks and other layers (like thick
film bridges and components) on the boards, and the boards are punched not
drilled (holes and edges alike). Some newer boards are molded/glued to contain
flex cables in them already. None of this applies for hobby use.

The technique I liked most for hobby use was the modified inkjet printer used to
print masks directly onto boards. See here:

 http://www.sxlist.com/techref/pcb/etch/directinkjetresist.htm

Now, I hope that someone will start selling specialized 'remanufactured' inkjet
heads soon, to fill this need.

Peter


2009\01\27@131226 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>I believe there is also a significant set of boards made
>where the "resist" is actually the tin/lead plate, and the
>etchant is some ammonia based concoction.  (I'm not sure
what RHoS has done to this process.)  Naturally, a plated
>resist makes for the possibility of very fine lines...

The process as explained to me was that a tinning process was related to
doing plated through holes (this was when the company I was with was looking
at getting its first PTH PCBs done). I don't recall the ins and outs of the
process.

2009\01\27@141822 by solarwind

picon face
On Tue, Jan 27, 2009 at 12:58 PM, Peter <spam_OUTplpeter2006TakeThisOuTspamyahoo.com> wrote:
> The technique I liked most for hobby use was the modified inkjet printer used to
> print masks directly onto boards. See here:
>
>  http://www.sxlist.com/techref/pcb/etch/directinkjetresist.htm
>
> Now, I hope that someone will start selling specialized 'remanufactured' inkjet
> heads soon, to fill this need.
>
> Peter

I was quite literally drooling for a second looking at that TSSOP.
This method is amazing - how come no one mentioned this
before?!?!?!?!?!?!?

--
solarwind

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2009 , 2010 only
- Today
- New search...