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'[OT] Home Made SMD Soldering'
1999\08\05@165544 by Wagner Lipnharski

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Just to refresh the idea.
Where can I find a small and economic oven to do home-smd-soldering?
Wagner.

1999\08\05@170723 by Juimiin Hong

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> Where can I find a small and economic oven to do home-smd-soldering?

I don't know, but I have soldered a couple of boards with surface mount
components.  All you need is a small tip on your soldering iron and a pair
of tweezers.

-Juimiin

1999\08\05@171721 by Dan Creagan

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The technique I've seen is to solder the four corners and
get it all aligned. Then dab each of the leads. If the pads
are prepared properly, you don't need extra solder.

If you are doing a lot of this, you might want to wear
armored wrist bands. It stops you from chewing off your
limbs in frustration 8)

Dan

-----Original Message-----
From: Juimiin Hong <spam_OUTmeTakeThisOuTspamELASTIC.ORG>
To: .....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Thursday, August 05, 1999 11:16 AM
Subject: Re: [OT] Home Made SMD Soldering


>> Where can I find a small and economic oven to do
home-smd-soldering?
>
>I don't know, but I have soldered a couple of boards with
surface mount
>components.  All you need is a small tip on your soldering
iron and a pair
>of tweezers.
>
>-Juimiin

1999\08\05@172558 by Wagner Lipnharski

picon face
I have done that during the last 3 years, but things went out of
control, with the 0.5mm pitch Toshiba components. I really need a small
oven with programable temperature control. I can't find anywhere in the
market, just the big ones...
Wagner.

Juimiin Hong wrote:
>
> > Where can I find a small and economic oven to do home-smd-soldering?
>
> I don't know, but I have soldered a couple of boards with surface mount
> components.  All you need is a small tip on your soldering iron and a pair
> of tweezers.
>
> -Juimiin

1999\08\05@172813 by Anne Ogborn
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Wagner Lipnharski wrote:
>
> Just to refresh the idea.
> Where can I find a small and economic oven to do home-smd-soldering?
> Wagner.

toaster oven, according to roommate the manufacturing engineer

--
Anniepoo
Need loco motors?
http://www.idiom.com/~anniepoo/depot/motors.html

1999\08\05@173433 by eplus1

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Wave:

Use electric skillets for dip (wave) soldering and tin/lead plaiting. The
basic problem with home plating is that a roundness forms that causes the
leads to slip off the pads. You can use wick to remove the rounded tops.
"Mopping" the solder over the board with an iron can result in uneven solder
height which can prevent all the chip leads from contacting the pads. Again,
solder wick can remove "bumps"

One problem with dip soldering is that the package picks up moisture and
turns to steam if heated rapidly as in wave soldering. This can cause
delamination of the plastic from the die or leadframe. I've observed the
problem appearing as blown output pins. Smaller packages are rarely a
problem. Typically you can pre-bake the chip for 12-24 hours at low enough
temperatures to prevent rapid generation of steam (Altera suggests 12hrs at
260F).

Reflow:

Toaster ovens or hardware store hot air guns for smt reflow.

Preheat:

Preheat the board to about 100 C (212 F) with an electric pancake griddle,
keeping everything except the area being worked on covered with cardboard to
avoid burns. (Commercial hot air soldering equipment uses preheat from 100
to 150 C AFIK) The other reason for preheat is to drastically reduce the
amount of time hot air must be applied to complete the soldering operation,
significantly reducing thermal stresses.

BTY: You can use hot melt glue guns to make plastic injection molded parts.

James Newton, webmaster http://get.to/techref
.....jamesnewtonKILLspamspam.....geocities.com <EraseMEjamesnewtonspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgeocities.com>
1-619-652-0593 phoneÊ



-----Original Message-----
From: pic microcontroller discussion list
[PICLISTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of Wagner Lipnharski
Sent: Thursday, August 05, 1999 1:55 PM
To: @spam@PICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: [OT] Home Made SMD Soldering


Just to refresh the idea.
Where can I find a small and economic oven to do home-smd-soldering?
Wagner.

1999\08\05@173850 by tim

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now that was good ...toaster oven... right next to the  frozen breakfast
scrambles...hehe...sorry...but the idea was good........
{Original Message removed}

1999\08\05@174509 by Barry King

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Wagner,

Mass soldering of SMD boards is done my several processes
1) silkscreen gluey solder paste onto board
2) place components
3) let dry
4) reflow.  This takes very careful heat control to melt the solder,
but not the parts.  I doubt you could do it in your toaster oven,
because you'd overheat the parts before the solder flows

Another (unusual) method uses hot fluorocarbon vapor to do the
reflow.

When possible, its really cheap to
1) glue the parts to the board without solder
2) wave solder the whole board
Which requires the parts to take a solder bath.  Some parts can be
"dip" soldered like this, others not.

I do SMD prototyping by
1) apply solder paste using air-piston syringe.
2) reflow by hand with a hot-air pencil
Our soldering station here includes these tools plus through hole
rework tools and cost about $USD 3000, used.  Not too cheap.

On my bench, I
1) hold parts with superglue or tweezers
2) hold my breath
3) solder with teeny tiny soldering iron
4) wait for alleged toxic vapor from superglue to dissipate and
solder to cool
5) breathe
6) let go of tweezers

Cheaper, but it takes a steady hand and won't work on TSSOP or other
really dense chip scale stuff.  I'm getting good at SOIC's though!

So, all kidding aside, I would recommend the tiny soldering iron for
your prototyping your SMD PICS.  (see this IS on topic)

------------
Barry King, KA1NLH
Engineering Manager
NRG Systems "Measuring the Wind's Energy"
Hinesburg, Vermont, USA
http://www.nrgsystems.com

1999\08\05@175519 by ARudzki

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I've done this with a toaster oven.  It works but

1) you need to watch the heat & the solder.  When it flows, get it outta
there.
2) If you don't get the temp right, the board bakes before the solder melts
(fiberglass edges get DARK)


tony

1999\08\05@181135 by PJH

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Juimiin Hong wrote:

> > Where can I find a small and economic oven to do home-smd-soldering?
>
> I don't know, but I have soldered a couple of boards with surface mount
> components.  All you need is a small tip on your soldering iron and a pair
> of tweezers.
>

That's my experience also. You need good eyesight and\or a maglamp plus a
steady hand. Grind your soldering iron's nib down to a fine point. (You need
to shorten it before forming the point or you lose excessive heat.) Apply
solder the tracks before positioning the chip, then heat the track in front of
the pin and let the solder flow into the pin\track joint. (Applying the nib
direct to each pin is a loser - solder bridgeing.) The least amount of solder
possible, obviously.

Some people say to use glue or tape to hold the chip in position but you can
hold the chip in place with a finger while you solder the first pin then
solder the one diagonally opposite.

Even so, it's fiddly work and you risk a nervous breakdown if you try to do
too many at one sitting.

Good luck - PJH

1999\08\05@184439 by Richard A. Smith

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On Thu, 5 Aug 1999 17:40:13 -0500, Barry King wrote:

>On my bench, I
>1) hold parts with superglue or tweezers
>2) hold my breath
>3) solder with teeny tiny soldering iron
>4) wait for alleged toxic vapor from superglue to dissipate and
>solder to cool
>5) breathe
>6) let go of tweezers
>
>Cheaper, but it takes a steady hand and won't work on TSSOP or other
>really dense chip scale stuff.  I'm getting good at SOIC's though!
>

Dude.. Get a hoof tip (special $25 SMT tip).  It's long and shaped
like a knife edge.  Apply a little bit of solder to the edge, dump
lots of flux on the pins and then drag the edge across the pins.
Something about surface tension make damn near perfect joints.  Shoot
our techs here like the tips so much they use them for almost any
type of soldering needed.


--
Richard A. Smith                         Bitworks, Inc.
KILLspamrsmithKILLspamspambitworks.com               501.521.3908
Sr. Design Engineer        http://www.bitworks.com

1999\08\05@185309 by Craig Lee

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If you have an infra red cook top, convection oven, and your wife is out
of town, this method works well:

1) Squeeze solder paste onto each pad.  You could fashion a stencil and
  squeegie on, but if you are only doing a few, it isn't worth the hassle.

2) Place parts on the pre-pasted pads.  Don't worry about gluing them down
  or placing them perfectly on the pads.  Surface tension will hold them
  down and centre them for you as long as each side is stuck in the paste.

3) Pre-heat the board on the IR top.  Use a thermometer to ensure temperature
  is about 100C.  This not only reduces the time in the oven, but it reduces
  the thermal shock to the board connections, especially if it is multi-layer.
  Note:  If the boards have not been stored in an air tight dry environment,
  it may be a good idea to dry them for some time in a 70C oven prior to step
  1.

4) Place in convection oven pre heated to melting point of your solder paste.
  (see specification). Measure with thermometer to ensure temperature. A
  regular oven will work too, but the heat is more uniform in a convection
  type oven.  When the paste has melted and become shiny, and the components
  have auto aligned themselves, carefully remove the board and place on range
  top to cool.

5) Correct any defects.  You'ld be really lucky if there weren't any!

5) Place board(s) in dishwasher, add detergent, and cycle.

6) Serve warm with a sprig of parsley.

This method works very well.  However, when we did it last, I had a process
engineer with 20 years experience helping me.

If you are doing a double sided board, there is a special heat curing epoxy
that you can purchase (from solder paste supplier) that will cure during step 4.
Apply it the same way you do the solder paste, but between the pads. Don't get
it on you, as it is a bitch to get off! Thus when you repeat steps 1-4 for the
other side, your side1 parts won't fall off, leaving evidence for your wife to
find...  Not that she ever would since I do all the cooking!

And hey, if you have one of those new CEBUS controlled ranges, you could just
program it to do your reflow!

Craig

> {Original Message removed}

1999\08\05@201907 by kirmse

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Wagner Lipnharski wrote:

> Just to refresh the idea.
> Where can I find a small and economic oven to do home-smd-soldering?
> Wagner.

Sounds like a design project idea. Using one or more PICs of course.


---------------------------------------------------------------------
| Dr. Kevin Dale Kirmse, PhD EE
| Portable System Design, High Speed Serial Links
| FPGA Design, Video Hardware, Graphics Hardware
|
| King of Prussia, PA 19406
| RemoveMEkirmseTakeThisOuTspamnetaxs.com
---------------------------------------------------------------------

1999\08\05@202242 by Terry

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We happened to have an old PID temp controller and termocouple from an old
upgrade project and hooked it up to a 600W toaster oven. Most of our boards
are small so it fits into the oven just fine.

We put the boards into the oven and start the PID controller. Setting is
80C for 15 minutes, ramp up to 120C in 15 minutes, hold for 10 minutes,
ramp up to 160C in 5 minutes and immediately back down to 80C for 15
minutes. Open oven, do not remove board and allow to cool to room temp.

We got this setting from trial and error, u'll have to do the same and
settings for 4 or more layers will require longer times or ur plated
through holes might fracture.

Applying solder paste is another problem we went through. We made a jig to
dip the SMT leads in.

1 pc 3" square, flat glass base
4 pcs NT cutter blades (the snap off type, small)
1 pc NT cutter blade (Large)

Glue the 4 blades (sharp edge facing out) onto glass base forming a
rectangle (snap off some sections of blade to fit) does not have to be a
perfect rectangular perimeter.

Scoop some solder paste onto glass within the rectangle blade area, use
large NT cutter blade to spread the paste using the rectangular structure
as a height guide. You'll have a uniform thickness of solder paste to dip
ur SMT leads into. Don't press too hard, just enuf to get some paste onto
ALL the leads. Don't worry about bridging, solder mask and surface tension
takes care of *most* bridging problems.

Cheers
Terry

1999\08\05@220417 by Wagner Lipnharski

picon face
Terry wrote:
>
> We happened to have an old PID temp controller and termocouple from an old
> upgrade project and hooked it up to a 600W toaster oven. Most of our boards
> are small so it fits into the oven just fine.
>
> We put the boards into the oven and start the PID controller. Setting is
> 80C for 15 minutes, ramp up to 120C in 15 minutes, hold for 10 minutes,
> ramp up to 160C in 5 minutes and immediately back down to 80C for 15
> minutes. Open oven, do not remove board and allow to cool to room temp.
[snip]

Thank you Terry and other responses.

I was thinking to assembly an oven designed just for this application,
and I know that it requires an air flow to spread an uniform heat inside
the oven, it also needs to have an opening to allow heat escape, so the
temp can lower down when the heaters are off, and so on.

As the max temperature is only 160¡C, I think it would be not difficult
to build it.  A piece (rectangular plate) of ceramic could be the
platform where the board(s) would rest in the middle of the oven, and
the temp sensors would be right between the ceramic and the board(s).

My doubt is about;

1) Air Flow inside the oven... if necessary.
2) Where to install the heaters if no air flow is installed (side, top,
bottom, everywhere?)
3) Solder paste, which one, model, type, codes, etc.
4) There is a bunch of other chemicals related to SMD soldering,
cleaning, coating, etc... where to find all this information.  

You know something... For more than 2 years I have being receiving a
free magazine named "SMT something", every issue I read entirely (as I
do with the others), and I never found nothing useful about solder paste
codes, types, other chemicals, practical experiments and so on....  but
yes, lots of advertisements of huge new automatic machines and lots of
specialized software... I need to come here to get something useful,
isn't interesting?

Thanks.
Wagner.

1999\08\05@222246 by Fredric White

picon face
Richard A. Smith writes:
> Dude.. Get a hoof tip (special $25 SMT tip)...

These hoof tips sound great (ftp://ftp.metcal.com/pdfs/minihoof.pdf).
Does anyone besides Metcal make them?  Like, for Weller irons?

(Many good soldering tech notes at the Metcal site, BTW.)

< Fredric

1999\08\06@002215 by Anne Ogborn

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> You know something... For more than 2 years I have being receiving a
> free magazine named "SMT something", every issue I read entirely (as I
> do with the others), and I never found nothing useful about solder paste
> codes, types, other chemicals, practical experiments and so on....  but
> yes, lots of advertisements of huge new automatic machines and lots of
> specialized software... I need to come here to get something useful,
> isn't interesting?

Sadly, the advertising budget for automatic wave flow machines is bigger
than the advertising budget for toaster ovens.

I always thought this stuff "needed a factory" until I moved in with a
process engineer. She told me she got started as half of a tiny prototype
house, and they did all their production with stuff like toaster ovens
and hot plates.

--
Anniepoo
Need loco motors?
http://www.idiom.com/~anniepoo/depot/motors.html

1999\08\06@004353 by Jeff Barlow

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Annie, Please get her to do a brain dump and post the result here. My eyes
(and the rest of me) keep getting older and those SMD pins keep getting
smaller.



{Original Message removed}

1999\08\06@013305 by Rob Symmans

flavicon
picon face
I have bought & used a similar sounding tip for weller irons here in
Australia - thip was referred to
as a "miniwave" tip. Sorry I can't help with further info as to brand /
supplier.
rob


Subject:
       Re: [OT] Home Made SMD Soldering
  Date:
       Thu, 5 Aug 1999 22:20:39 -0400
  From:
       Fredric White <spamBeGonefwhitespamBeGonespamPOBOX.COM>



Richard A. Smith writes:
> Dude.. Get a hoof tip (special $25 SMT tip)...

These hoof tips sound great (ftp://ftp.metcal.com/pdfs/minihoof.pdf).
Does anyone besides Metcal make them?  Like, for Weller irons?

(Many good soldering tech notes at the Metcal site, BTW.)

< Fredric

1999\08\06@014117 by William K. Borsum

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At 05:54 PM 8/5/99 -0400, you wrote:
>I've done this with a toaster oven.  It works but

I do a LOT of SMT work--including fine pitch (0.025" stuff) TSOP
parts--including PICS.
Picked up an air dispenser for solder paste, tried that.  Had a
professional stencil made for a board--tried that.  Consistent reflow was a
serious problem.  Quantity stuff gets farmed out to the Pro's these days.
But for small lots--say ten boards or so, with maybe 50 components in a mix
of 1206/0805/SOIC/TSOP, I have finally ended up doing it all by hand.
You need--repeat NEED--a couple of things.  They cost $$ but will pay for
themselves faster than you can ever imagine:
       First a pair of binocular over the head and eyeglasses magnifiers--Harbo
r
Freight sells a wonderful set for $5!  Two powers via a second flip down
lens. $30 for the same thing from any of the tool houses.  Don't bother
with the fluorescent lights with the big lenses--to cumbersome.  Put it on
your head and flip down when needed.  If you can't see what you are
doing.......
       Second: a GOOD, HOT soldering iron with a small--but not too
small--"angled screwdriver" style tip. I used Edsyn's 951SX with the 95
watt heater and tips--and keep it turned all the way up.
       Third: a source of hot hair in a pencil fine stream.  Again, Hakko 851 o
r
equivalent.  Pricey, but will pay for itself in the first few rework jobs
you do.  Can't emphasize this enough. I got a set of tips, but only use the
smallest round one.
       Lastly: at least one Precista 111SA tweezers.  This little guy has an
angled tip, with two flat surfaces that are grooved to grab  and hold round
diodes, chip resistors, and IC's very firmly with lots of control. I think
I paid $40 or more for mine. Sorry, but fingers and pliers just won't work
for production assembly of really small parts.
       Also, Pamona makes a neat pair of tweezers with contacts on the ends and
test leads.  Plug it into your multi-meter and measure voltage drop across
chip resistors with one hand.  About $15.
       All of this stuff should be available from Instrument Engineers in San
Diego at reasonable prices--Tell Jim Hoffman that Kelly sent you.


Here is my procedure for really fine pitch stuff (25 Mil TSOP's):

0. First and Formost: ALL of our boards are made from 185 DegC GETEK
material--will take total immersion in liquid solder--and I have yet to
blister or otherwise damage a board thermally.  Well worth the extra
pennies per board.  I will never ever have a board made of FR4 again.
Also, be sure the board and the chips are DRY--bake out at 50 degC or so
overnite--or see manufacturers recommendations.  Keep chips in the original
paks with dry-rite.  Chips absorb moisture and will literally explode with
too much heat too fast.

1. Get one of the water soluble flux pens from Mouser, and use it to coat
the pads on the PCB.  Then using a soldering iron and water soluble flux
cored solder, flow solder across the pads.  Get a blob on the tip of the
iron and just drag it slowly across the pads.  This will coat each pad with
as much solder as it will hold.  The flux keeps it all from bridging across
adjacent pads.  Takes a bit to get the knack, but is really easy.

2.  Flux the pads AGAIN--and the pins of the part.

3.  If you have a solder pot--dip the well fluxed leads into the solder and
shake off so the leads are tinned as well.  This step is optional and works
on difficult parts--but can leave all the leads blobbed together if you are
not careful.  Again--FLUX is the key.  Sometimes I have to use Rosin flux
here if the leads are dirty or not well tinned to begin with.  Clean the
Rosin flux off the parts before proceeding!  Use chloroform, or if you can
find it, a rosin saponifier.  Mouser used to sell the stuff, but stopped
with the last catalog.

4.  Solder opposite corners of the part to the board to ensure alignment in
the next step.  Flux again.

5. Using a pencil hot air system (mine is a HAKKO 815--about $700 from
Fry's) reflow the solder on each side of the chip--2-5 seconds is enough.
A slight pressure on the top of the part will let it seat down hard on the
PCB.  I have also used the bottom of a clothes iron, small electric frying
pan or 700-watt lamp with heat reflector.  Object is to get the pins and
solder hot and melted together as quickly as possible and get off.  Be sure
to let the Hakko warm up for a few minutes to get maximum heat.

{an aside:  I believe based on years of practical hands on experience that
the hotter the heat source, the faster you get on and off the joint, and
the lower the total heat transfer to the component--and the lower the
probability of damage.  Keeping an iron set just above the melting point of
the solder is asking for thermal damage.  Also, use the lowest melting
point solder possible.  i use a Kester Sn63Pb37 organic core solder.  If
you can get it with 2% silver, the liquidus drops another 5 degrees or
so--but I've only seen it in bars}

6.  Using a combination of Simple Green and VERY hot water, clean the
board.  Dry with compressed DRY air.  Wash again with denatured alcohol or
anhydrous rubbing alcohol (not the cheap stuff at the drug store), and
again blow off.  Bake dry at 50 degC or so.  If you are near Mexico, get
Cano Puro (99 % grain alcohol), and you can drink the stuff too--diluted)

7.  Result is an extraordinarily professional looking PCB.  Leaving flux on
the board leads to corrosion and LEAKS.  I've seen power consumption on a
data logger drop from 35 to 10 uA just by cleaning and drying the board.  I
have done 100+ 16C57 chips an hour using this technique and a little planning.



Larger parts--like SOIC's with pads on 50 mil spacing:

Put a dab of solder on the #-1 pad for each chip.  (this also provides a
visual clue on chip orientation--dot on chip goes to solder blob)
Using a pair of tweezers and a solder iron, locate the chip and slide pin
one into the molten pool of solder to hold it in place.
FLUX all the pins and pads
Lay a piece of solder (again, I use the smallest diameter multi-core I can
get--about 25 mil) across the ENDS of the pins so it is touch both the pins
and the pads along one side of the chip--the side opposite pin 1.  Touch
the solder with a hot iron at the end of the solder.  It will melt onto the
pad and pin.  Without moving the solder, do the next pin, and the next,
till the side is done.  Each time you touch, the end of the solder will be
perfectly placed for the next joint.
Repeat on the other side. And you are done.
Clean as above.

Two pin and three pin parts--as above.  Blob of solder on a pad--melt the
solder and slide the correct pin into the solder till the part is located,
then get the heat off.  Solder the other pins.


If you have EVER tried to remove through hole parts, you know what a pain
it is.  I can get SMT resistors and multi-pin IC's on and OFF a board in
seconds with NO damage to the board or part.  Won't use through-hole
passives or actives any may unless there is duress or SMT parts just aren't
available.  (pin headers are an exception--where the mechanical support is
required for other purposes)

Enjoy.
Kelly
****************************************************************************
********
All legitimate attachments to this email will be clearly identified in the
text.
William K. Borsum, P.E.
OEM Dataloggers and Instrumentation Systems
<TakeThisOuTborsumEraseMEspamspam_OUTdascor.com> & <http://www.dascor.com>

1999\08\06@015158 by Dennis Plunkett

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At 13:29 6/08/99 +0800, you wrote:
>I have bought & used a similar sounding tip for weller irons here in
>Australia - thip was referred to
>as a "miniwave" tip. Sorry I can't help with further info as to brand /
>supplier.
>rob
>

Mektronics

Dennis

1999\08\06@020830 by Dave VanHorn

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> Annie, Please get her to do a brain dump and post the result here. My eyes
> (and the rest of me) keep getting older and those SMD pins keep getting
> smaller.

Indeed!  I've heard of the "easy-bake" technique, but never known how it was
done.
I just use my weller 40W and a steady hand, but at (gasp) 42, it's getting a
little more challenging.

1999\08\06@120633 by eplus1

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face
The entire purpose of the companies we all work for is to make a profit. If
you give your "trade secrets" (read: how things actually work) to others,
they will be able to compete and reduce your profits. On the other hand, if
you don't share trade secrets, technology fails to advance and others who
are sharing will get ahead of you. The us patent system was designed to
address this issue by requiring that people share but allowing for "credit
where credit is due" when appropriate. It doesn't work but it was a good
try. Anyway, if it wasn't for the PICLIST and other "back door" means of
engineers to talk freely (like my techref) without management realizing that
we are giving away info, we would be spending a lot more time re-inventing
the wheel and a lot less time making cool gizmos. Right?

James Newton, webmaster http://get.to/techref
RemoveMEjamesnewtonspamTakeThisOuTgeocities.com <jamesnewtonEraseMEspam.....geocities.com>
1-619-652-0593 phone



{Original Message removed}

1999\08\06@124333 by Anne Ogborn

flavicon
face
Jeff Barlow wrote:
>
> Annie, Please get her to do a brain dump and post the result here. My eyes
> (and the rest of me) keep getting older and those SMD pins keep getting
> smaller.
>

I'll try, though she just got married & I rarely see her (yes, I have
a strange living arrangement - I live with a woman who doesn't live here).


--
Anniepoo
Need loco motors?
http://www.idiom.com/~anniepoo/depot/motors.html

1999\08\06@130254 by Jann P. Kaminski

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I have had great success using solder paste (Kester) and a sharp tip
solder iron.

1)Apply solder paste (H2O soluble flux) with syringe to pad.
2)Place smd and align part
3)Solder corner pins for alignment first by heating the pad and pin at
the same time. The paste will flow only on the pad/pin. An eyeloop or
microscope helps.
4) Solder remaining pins.
5) rinse and clean part in water. Toothbrush helps. Blow air to dry

Jann





Dr. Jann P. Kaminski
Research Scientist
UNIAX Corp.
6780 Cortona Dr.
Santa Barbara, CA 93117-3022
(805) 562-9293
fax: (805) 562-9144
EraseMEjannspamuniax.com
http://www.uniax.com

                {Original Message removed}

1999\08\06@170019 by Mark Walsh

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>
> I'll try, though she just got married & I rarely see her (yes, I have
> a strange living arrangement - I live with a woman who doesn't live here).
>
>
> --
> Anniepoo
>

If she's willing to pay rent, I'd be more than happy to let her not live
with me too.

Mark Walsh

1999\08\09@120709 by Lawrence Lile

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Order a convection oven from Toastmaster inc.    1-800-947-3744.  I use them
for lab experiments all the time.


(BTW I work for them so I am biased.)

-- Lawrence Lile



-----Original Message-----
From: Wagner Lipnharski <RemoveMEwagnerlEraseMEspamEraseMEEARTHLINK.NET>
To: RemoveMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU <RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Thursday, August 05, 1999 3:56 PM
Subject: [OT] Home Made SMD Soldering


>Just to refresh the idea.
>Where can I find a small and economic oven to do home-smd-soldering?
>Wagner.

1999\08\09@124242 by Lawrence Lile

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Walter,

It is a larger toaster oven, with fairly accurate temperature control and a
fan to move air around inside the oven.  Costs under $100 US.  Model number
is 7094.  Call 1-800-947-3744 for your nearest distributor or to order one
by mail.  We also make a 240 volt version if you are not in the US.

Also bakes a nice roast!

-- Lawrence


{Original Message removed}

1999\08\09@124855 by Lawrence Lile

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Wagner -

Sorry - I gave some wrong information last time:

The current model on the convection oven is the 7093.  It's list price is
$130, probably less from discounters.

You can check one out at   http://www.toastmaster.com

You can also order online, but there is a bad link in that page.  I am
complaining to the guy who writes our HTML as we speak.

-- Lawrence




{Original Message removed}

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